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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 1 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 42
Author
Drones
dalai
3-Oct-2016
12:33:02 AM
First time at Araps in a number of years.

A hell of a lot of people. Many love the place and it was a long weekend so I get that. It's a big place so easy to find something to do away from others.

Never really got slack lining, but they seem to be enjoying themselves and the 230m line from the Pharos to the Watchtower face was impressive.

But heading up Lamplighter for my first time Saturday. Sitting on the first belay ledge enjoying being back on rock at such a special place at what is a tough time for me when there is suddenly a racket destroying the serenity. Hadn't heard a drone before and must say it is loud and very annoying. During the course of the afternoon it came over a number of times. Seriously!!??

Anyone know how to make / buy a jammer?

Superstu
3-Oct-2016
8:11:20 AM
A well-aimed rock?
dalai
3-Oct-2016
9:20:07 AM
Considered it but were still too low on the route - if we had been on the top of the Pharos I'd have possibly given that a try!
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
9:35:30 AM
Yes, there was a drone around on Friday afternoon as well. I wandered along below Tiger Wall to Pharos boulders and back to Central Gully in search of dry bouldering and the thing was buzzing around the whole time.
Incredibly annoying to have around for well over an hour. People with those things really need to have some consideration. Maybe if they have to spend extended periods of time editing out people giving the finger to the camera (mooning is apparently now illegal)?
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
9:47:38 AM
On slack-lining, I think it's great but I'm too old to take it up (too much chance of injury trying to learn this with aging reflexes).

The one quiblle I have with it at Arapiles is the practice of putting lines up and leaving them there for days. On aspect is the noise of unattended slack-lines in the wind.

The other is the potential impact on helicopter rescues. If there is a slack-line in the area you cannot have a helicopter coming close, especially with a paramedic on a winch cable. The lines just aren't that visible enough. There was a situation last year with an accident in Major Mitchell gully. The slackline rigged between the Dunes Buttress and the Bluffs meant it was a no-go zone for the chopper.

Can the lines be dropped when not in use, including overnight? I know setting them up again would be a pain, even with the rigging at each end still in place, but they do create a problem if there's an accident.

Zarb
3-Oct-2016
9:54:39 AM
Drones are actually becoming quite commonplace now even at my local surf spot. Obviously the noise isn't as noticeable with all the crashing waves, but still annoying to have one constantly hovering above the lineup...
dalai
3-Oct-2016
10:41:44 AM
On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
> Maybe if they have to spend extended periods of time editing out people giving the finger to the camera

That could be it, as a number of people including myself may have been giving it extended one finger salutes! Was hard enough to hear my partner with the wind as it was - then with the drone overhead for extended periods...

In regards to being in the way of the helicopters - hadn't thought of that!
simey
3-Oct-2016
10:46:05 AM
On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:

>Can the lines be dropped when not in use, including overnight? I know
>setting them up again would be a pain, even with the rigging at each end
>still in place, but they do create a problem if there's an accident.

I imagine de-rigging and re-rigging slacklines constantly would be a pain in the arse. On the rare occasions there is an accident and a slackline happens to be in the way of a chopper rescue, then that is the time to de-rig it.
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
11:31:35 AM
On 3/10/2016 simey wrote:
>On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>
>>Can the lines be dropped when not in use, including overnight? I know
>>setting them up again would be a pain, even with the rigging at each
>end
>>still in place, but they do create a problem if there's an accident.
>
>I imagine de-rigging and re-rigging slacklines constantly would be a pain
>in the arse. On the rare occasions there is an accident and a slackline
>happens to be in the way of a chopper rescue, then that is the time to
>de-rig it.

I can see that happening (not). Who's going to do that?
BA
3-Oct-2016
11:34:29 AM
Somebody with a Yates belay knife?

E. Wells
3-Oct-2016
12:09:33 PM
The irony is so many drone films have serene soundracks. Yes they are very annoying and , just like glue in bolts, ruin the outdoors experience. Drones sacrifice a peacefull reality for a fabrication. I used to abseil with commercial groups and in the last five years its normal to have big noist lithium powered mosquitos hovering above instead of birds. Only a 35+klm westerly can change that then its hardly peaceful anyhow. The only way around it is to venture further from carparks. The last time I was in the proximity of a drone was un the grease cave in nowra thoughi wasnt fussed as it drowned out the noise of people/dogs/toddlers/jetskis and im the noisiest screamer on those types of routes anyhow. Ive never taken issue with paragliders quitely hovering above belays etc....its just the noise that is really invasive , firstworld problems really considering what drones have been up to for the last decade and a half.
Rawpowa!
3-Oct-2016
12:18:35 PM
I heard one down in Arapiles last week for the first time and they are a lot noisier than I imagined. I assume they wouldn't have to hover much higher to make the heard noise a lot less? Anyway thankfully they take one look at me climbing and drone away.
simey
3-Oct-2016
12:20:37 PM
On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>On 3/10/2016 simey wrote:
>>On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>>
>>>Can the lines be dropped when not in use, including overnight? I know
>>>setting them up again would be a pain, even with the rigging at each
>>end
>>>still in place, but they do create a problem if there's an accident.
>>
>>I imagine de-rigging and re-rigging slacklines constantly would be a
>pain
>>in the arse. On the rare occasions there is an accident and a slackline
>>happens to be in the way of a chopper rescue, then that is the time to
>>de-rig it.
>
>I can see that happening (not). Who's going to do that?

Someone in the rescue crew can lower the slackline if the owners aren't about. If there is a slackline in the way of a rescue, then I am sure the slackline crew aren't going to complain if it gets lowered to facilitate a rescue. Most of the time the rescue crew are standing around doing nothing waiting for a chopper to arrive anyway.
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
12:22:11 PM
On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>On 3/10/2016 simey wrote:
>>On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>>
>>>Can the lines be dropped when not in use, including overnight? I know
>>>setting them up again would be a pain, even with the rigging at each
>>end
>>>still in place, but they do create a problem if there's an accident.
>>
>>I imagine de-rigging and re-rigging slacklines constantly would be a
>pain
>>in the arse. On the rare occasions there is an accident and a slackline
>>happens to be in the way of a chopper rescue, then that is the time to
>>de-rig it.
>
>I can see that happening (not). Who's going to do that?

The problem with saying "Yes we can drop the lines" is that you can't guarantee it will be done quickly or that it can be done at all in the circumstances. If a chopper is coming to a serious incident it's usually there in about an hour from the call. That's not a lot of time to mobilise someone to go and de-rig a line. And if the accident is right below the highline, as it was last year, or there are climbers below, you can't just drop the line. You have to be able to get it down without further endangering people.

Yes accidents are infrequent but if people are going to do things such as high-lining, tyroleans, or even just leaving rap ropes set up they do have to be aware of the possible problems these can raise.
simey
3-Oct-2016
1:55:03 PM
On 3/10/2016 kieranl wrote:
>Yes accidents are infrequent but if people are going to do things such
>as high-lining, tyroleans, or even just leaving rap ropes set up they do
>have to be aware of the possible problems these can raise.

Rescue involves dealing with whatever situation is thrown at you... day time, night time, rain, hail, shine, inaccessibility, lack of personnel, and slack lines!
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
2:10:03 PM
Yep, if they're there they'll be dealt with. But it would be nice if they weren't there when not actually in use.
martym
3-Oct-2016
3:51:39 PM
Could someone put an informative brochure up on the toilet block notice board? A big picture of someone high lining will get people's attention, and then just a few points about the risks to a rescue if left unattended.

Could mention that extended exposure to the elements will likely mean the line will break. Dan Osman died in a similar accident.
simey
3-Oct-2016
4:05:05 PM
On 3/10/2016 martym wrote:
>Could someone put an informative brochure up on the toilet block notice
>board? A big picture of someone high lining will get people's attention,
>and then just a few points about the risks to a rescue if left unattended.

Are you guys serious?!!
simey
3-Oct-2016
4:07:57 PM
On 3/10/2016 martym wrote:
>Could mention that extended exposure to the elements will likely mean
>the line will break. Dan Osman died in a similar accident.

Are you totally sure about that? I thought his accident also had something to do with other factors only associated with what was a pretty outrageous rope jump.
kieranl
3-Oct-2016
4:17:13 PM
On 3/10/2016 simey wrote:
>On 3/10/2016 martym wrote:
>>Could someone put an informative brochure up on the toilet block notice
>>board? A big picture of someone high lining will get people's attention,
>>and then just a few points about the risks to a rescue if left unattended.
>
>Are you guys serious?!!
>

I'm with Simey here. Noticeboard brochures are generally pretty ineffective and would probably be more likely to be counter-productive, seen as condescending, elitist (add your own description here...).
I'm pretty sure that the people doing this stuff know their gear inside and out and aren't going to be leaving it out in the weather long enough to degrade.

 Page 1 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 42
There are 42 messages in this topic.

 

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