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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

Rave About Your Rack Please do not post retail SPAM.

Poll Option Votes Graph
cams 33
75% 
hexs 11
25% 

 Page 4 of 5. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 92
Author
cams or hexs
devlin66
29/04/2009
9:41:28 AM
Might as well just buy the house and car, give them to your wife and leave with the mistress.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
29/04/2009
10:10:41 AM
On 28/04/2009 belayslave wrote:
>I've not used a Tibloc personally, however a friend used one on a relatively
>new rope and absolutely
>shreaded it. what his ascending technique was like - i'm not sure?!
>however if using a tibloc i'd be
>very careful and make sure you weight it slowly ensuring it bites fully
>and doesn't drag down the sheath.
>
>My preference would be for a good couple of prusiks, a couple of karabiners,
>and a good working
>knowledge of how to use it all!

Tiblocs are rather yuppy compared to simple prusiks, but after many years of using prusiks I finally added a couple of Tiblocs to the rack and have found them useful for more than one application*.

The critical thing I have found in using them is to match them to the karabiner they are used with carefully. Old style round stock are good (particularly ovals), rather than the thinner newer style asymmetric ones with flattened backbones. A friend of mine had slippage problems on an 11 mm rope till he changed to a larger krab, but there were nil sheath damage issues (a lot of frustration for progress though!), even with his 100 kg bodyweight.
This advice is even more important on thinner ropes; however I can attest from the recent Easter weekend experience I had, that Tiblocs work well on 9 mm rope if the right krab is used with them.

The advice of weighting it slowly is not correct.
This can work, but to do so one needs to pay particular attention to the angle of 'bite' that the Tibloc is lying in association with the rope it is on.
To do this action slowly is fiddlier than simply giving the wrist a little flick each time it is applied to 'set' the grab. On 9 mm rope they will simply ‘fall’ back down the rope unless you ‘set’ them with each placement in this fashion.

On 28/04/2009 tas alex wrote:
>prussicks work both ways, as in you can release them and slide
>them along the rope either up or down. tibloc only goes up unless you take
>it off the rope.

If the correct krab is used you will have no problems with slippage or sheath damage, and minimal problems setting them, including for down-prusiking which they are good at, if ever the need arises.

They can be a useful addition to the 'recue kit' as well for those so inclined.



*Although not intended for this use, they can be used for roped solo as a form of protection in conjunction with other items but be aware that there are many safety issues associated with this, including rope damage, along with the possibility of them not 'setting'.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
29/04/2009
11:47:07 AM
On 27/04/2009 wallwombat wrote:
>I'd get a couple of largish hexes rather than small ones. Large size nuts
>can cover the range of small hexes.

verses ...

On 27/04/2009 owl wrote:
>P.S. I still use small hexes (size 2,3 and 4) instead
>of big nuts. The size 4 and 5 are too narrow.

On 27/04/2009 andesite wrote:
>Regarding hexes - (snip) Though wouldn't bother with the super large sizes -
>3,4,5,6 are the ones I use the most.

I too find the small to medium ones more versatile than equivalent size nuts, and if paring down the rack I will dump the large nuts before their equivalent size hex.



ES asked about other peoples wired hex experience.

Generally I am not a fan of wired hexes.
When it comes to fingers fitting the placements my 1 – 3 hexes are wired and I reckon they are great for reach and also fiddly placements. I don’t have issues with the slung 4 – 6 size (or the rest through to size 11), and find they don’t need to be placed deep to work well. I wouldn’t want wires on them as it tends to limit them to two placement size options rather than three; ... however this would be no worse than equivalent sized nuts.
In general I think wires tend to lever placements more than cord, and also by default (for me), add weight to the rack because I clip wires with quickdraws to minimise this effect.
I have also found that I can use the slung hexes as runner extensions, to loop (sometimes girth-hitch), spikes/bollards, or sling vegetation enroute(!), especially if I anticipate that particular size pro is no longer required for the remainder of the lead.
I have also set many belays using them as slings after having run short of that gear on a pitch.


Eduardo Slabofvic
29/04/2009
12:52:49 PM
RE: Tiblocs. I carry tiblocs when shunting to change over to rap if needed whilst hanging. Yes, a prusic
would do the same job, but the tibloc is pretty quick. also carry tiblocs and prussics as part of self rescue
gear on longer routes. I've also noted the same things mention by IdrtherBm9 with respect to angle. If
you tention off them they'll have a tendency to let go as the biner rreleases the pressure on the rope. I've
neer noticed any sheath shredding, but you have to admit, having little teeth dig into your rope is going to
have some effect eventually.
gfdonc
29/04/2009
1:28:14 PM
I was going to get a tibloc at one stage, but decided - using the "if you're going to be a bear, be a grizzly" principle, to get a RopeMan II instead.
It's the works, with a stainless steel cam, basically an ascender without a handle.

I carry it on steep or multipitch routes, but haven't had to use it in desparation yet. Yes, I only have one, so have a prussic or two handy as well. However, I did find it useful to link into the belay once in a pseudo-hauling arrangement to make life a little easier while my second was dogging the life out of a 22 below me. Kinda like a Clayton's gri-gri, I guess.

The Ropeman I is a fair bit lighter, with an alloy cam, but doesn't accept such a wide range of rope sizes.
Wendy
29/04/2009
1:29:52 PM
Wildcountry ropeman. No teeth, bites on everything I've ever had to use it on, with any biner I've had available, no finikitiness at all. Much prefer it to tiblocs.
Duncan
29/04/2009
1:34:07 PM
On 28/04/2009 belayslave wrote:
>I've not used a Tibloc personally, however a friend used one on a relatively
>new rope and absolutely
>shreaded it. what his ascending technique was like - i'm not sure?!
>however if using a tibloc i'd be
>very careful and make sure you weight it slowly ensuring it bites fully
>and doesn't drag down the sheath.

No, you don't weight it slowly. That will result in it NOT engaging properly, and shredding the rope. Knowing how to use your gear will likely result in it working properly. Just sayin'...
gfdonc
29/04/2009
3:21:34 PM
On 29/04/2009 Wendy wrote:
>Wildcountry ropeman.

Wendy, is that the Ropeman I (alloy cam with straight flat teeth like a set of cogs) or the Ropeman II (steel cam with points on it to grip the sheath)?
citationx
29/04/2009
4:21:26 PM
On 26/04/2009 bomber pro wrote:
>I can see the attraction for using Hex's, as they are just big nuts (that
>can be camed)
>But I can place my cams anywhere I can place a Hex ! and they are more
>versatile.

really? even in inward opening cracks? that's impressive.

evanbb
29/04/2009
4:38:35 PM
On 29/04/2009 citationx wrote:
>really? even in inward opening cracks? that's impressive.

Yes, in the name of balance I'm going to defend hexes in an absolute sense as well. They are useful. However, in the context of the original post, what would I buy? Buy as many cams as you can afford and some big slung hexes if you can also.
Duncan
29/04/2009
4:40:18 PM
On 29/04/2009 citationx wrote:
>really? even in inward opening cracks? that's impressive.

Last pitch of Lamplighter, anyone?
gfdonc
29/04/2009
4:47:53 PM
On 29/04/2009 Duncan wrote:

>Last pitch of Lamplighter, anyone?

Not for me. Lady Dihedral is *the* way to finish that route .. unless you need to sandbag some gym junkie of course.

Sabu
29/04/2009
4:48:54 PM
Right with ya, lead it as i was starting out, hence only on hexes.

Chalk Free
29/04/2009
4:54:24 PM
Hexes and learn how to place pro.
Duncan
29/04/2009
5:13:50 PM
On 29/04/2009 gfdonc wrote:
>Not for me. Lady Dihedral is *the* way to finish that route .. unless
>you need to sandbag some gym junkie of course.

I have vague memories of a story of citationx being snadbagged into doing the last pitch of Lamplighter sans hex's...

Dutch
29/04/2009
6:22:34 PM
On 29/04/2009 Duncan wrote:
>On 29/04/2009 citationx wrote:
>>really? even in inward opening cracks? that's impressive.
>
>Last pitch of Lamplighter, anyone?


wow, i cant think of a better hex placement in the world than the last pitch of lamplighter... a blue one if i remember correctly!

Vertigo
29/04/2009
7:31:49 PM
M9 Wrote-
>I have also found that I can use the slung hexes as runner extensions,
>to loop (sometimes girth-hitch), spikes/bollards, or sling vegetation enroute(!),
&
>I have also set many belays using them as slings after having run short
>of that gear on a pitch.

Visions of "solid" shrubs & "bomber" fig trees & the Bungels flood my thoughts......(:-0)
Wendy
29/04/2009
8:44:55 PM
On 29/04/2009 gfdonc wrote:
>On 29/04/2009 Wendy wrote:
>>Wildcountry ropeman.
>
>Wendy, is that the Ropeman I (alloy cam with straight flat teeth like
>a set of cogs) or the Ropeman II (steel cam with points on it to grip the
>sheath)?
>
THink it's the 1 - it's pretty old and there wasn't a choice at the time ...
Duncan
29/04/2009
9:44:53 PM
On 29/04/2009 Dutch wrote:
>wow, i cant think of a better hex placement in the world than the last
>pitch of lamplighter... a blue one if i remember correctly!

Yup, if my memory is correct, Steve was told at the belay that he wouldn't need to carry the extra weight and so set off up the last pitch with everything but hex's...

SwineOfTheTimes
29/04/2009
10:24:54 PM
On 28/04/2009 hero wrote:
>Hey Swine, How does it feel to have a pandemic named after you?

Considering there have only been 8 confirmed deaths from this new strain of swine H1N1, 7 Mexico and 1 in the US, it's a got along way to go to come up to 1918-19 standards (Avian strain)!
But aren't the various government bodies doing a tremendous job of keeping us all scared... I mean safe.

 Page 4 of 5. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 92
There are 92 messages in this topic.

 

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