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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

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Author
goTenna communications technology.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/07/2014
1:12:48 PM
Hmm.
I was in process of replying to a Superstu initiated thread on goTenna devices, and it disappeared?
~> My PM to Stu for verification of what happened, was unable to be sent due his PM box is full...

Mod deletion as spam? ... or did Stu change his mind? What is the go?

It looks interesting and would have some specific-applications outdoors for climbers, etc.; and this particularly considering how often poor-comms are generally the norm in Australian out-back locations, though the technology also works in cities.


ajfclark
18/07/2014
1:45:00 PM
It's Tenna a brand name for a light bladder leakage pad or something?

IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/07/2014
1:46:18 PM
On 18/07/2014 ajfclark wrote:
>It's Tenna a brand name for a light bladder leakage pad or something?

No.

goTenna

ajfclark
18/07/2014
1:49:51 PM
Sorry, I was thinking of Tena:


IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/07/2014
1:53:34 PM
On 18/07/2014 ajfclark wrote:
>Sorry, I was thinking of Tena:
>
>

If a disappeared thread is derailed off-topic within 2 posts and the original thread starter doesn't notice, did it really happen?
;-)
Heh, heh, heh.

Superstu
18/07/2014
2:09:54 PM
Stu changed his mind.


I reckon it would be crap for big day out climbing as it only works when the following all happen:

- you remember to bring along your phone
- your phone is charged up
- your phone is switched on
- you remember to bring along your gotenna
- your gotenna is charged up
- your buddy remembers to bring along their phone
- your buddy remembers to charge up their phone
- your buddy has their phone switched on
- your buddy remembers to bring along their gotenna
- your buddy's gotenna is charged up
- there is not a big rock mountain thing between you and your buddy stopping the comms


Too much pfaff!

I'm still gonna look at walkietalkie headsets when I get over to the US in Sept. If they are lightweight, work with a helmet or hang off the harness without taking up space, and have a range of a few 100 meters... hmmmm 1km would be better.




gfdonc
18/07/2014
4:16:22 PM
On 18/07/2014 Superstu wrote:

>I'm still gonna look at walkietalkie headsets when I get over to the US
>in Sept.

The US operates on different frequencies. The US units are not legal for use in Australia.

Bluetooth headsets would of course be legal, but good luck communicating if you don't have line of sight. However I do know the guy that designs these (based in Bendigo):
http://www.phicom.com.au/extreme_xSports_2400.html
http://www.phicom.com.au/extreme_sports.html
He was keen to loan me some to test in climbing situations last time we spoke.

Superstu
18/07/2014
5:45:46 PM
Hmm, those look bulky and heavy, and I can't find a price on their website. Looks like their market is motor cyclists. But if your mate wants a pair road tested for 2 months on long routes in ahmericka lemme know...

A discussion on mountain project suggests from other people's experience walkie talkies are just a pain in the arse, nothing more. Although, at these prices I'm tempted to play with them anyway.

I'm all for rope signals when you're out of sight and the wind is howling etc... although I did start off up a greasy slippery-d*ck 5.9+ offwidth on the NE Face of Pingora in the Wind River Range thinking I was on belay only later to move around into the sunshine and see the Missus still up ahead leading off into the blue 15m above her last gear...





IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/07/2014
7:00:20 PM
On 18/07/2014 Superstu wrote:
>on the NE Face of Pingora in the Wind River Range thinking I was on belay
>only later to move around into the sunshine and see the Missus still up
>ahead leading off into the blue 15m above the last gear...
>
... No doubt, she was suitably impressed when you told her about it?




Are you half interested in my reply to your original thread? ... As I still have it...

Superstu
18/07/2014
7:03:40 PM
Sure
stingray4100
18/07/2014
7:06:00 PM
I've got those ones you've linked to Stu. They're great for windy multipitch, cheap as chips and if you drop them, or they get wet then there's not much to lose.

I've tied a couple of lanyards onto them and we hang them around our necks, tucked inside clothing - they're light and small. Really good battery life and we haven't had any issues with comms over the length of a pitch.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/07/2014
7:09:48 PM
On 18/07/2014 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>Are you half interested in my reply to your original thread? ... As I still have it...

On 18/07/2014 Superstu wrote:
>Sure

Ok. Here goes, ... (& includes your original post)...

On 18/07/2014 Superstu wrote:
>Normally I'm fairly dismissive of technology in the great outdoors (except for smart phone guidebooks of course) but this new little goTenna device looks kind of useful. The obvious debacle scenario is losing >track of your buddy on the approach/descent (and somehoworother it always seems to be my fault :-) or two climbing parties wanting to communicate.
>
>Basically you get phone-to-phone messaging using long range radio so no need for any cell tower reception at all. Battery life looks pokey so could just be yet another bludy thing to keep recharging on longer trips.
>
>Technically I don't think its much different than a VHF radio right? Except you get cached messaging instead of talkie, which could have advantages, and its a bit more compact.


It appears to be an interesting device, and I am surprised it has taken so long to become available to general public, as I'd expect the military application of similar has been in use for some time now.

In fact, I recall that maybe 18 months ago there were media reports of neglect of medical compensation for Aussie Commando's adversely health-affected by huge-arse versions of this technology.
Hmm, at general public level. This raises the question that if there is a question mark over mobile phone usage for our health; are these devices adding incrementally in a negative way, to that?

Re battery life the site FAQ's elaborates.

What is the battery life of a goTenna?
The battery will last you through 2-3 days of normal usage, meaning you have it on when you need to and turn it off when you donít (e.g. when youíre sleeping). If itís on 24/7, it will last 30 hours or so. If off, it will hold its charge for about a year and a half.

Is Bluetooth going to kill my smartphoneís battery life?
No. Bluetooth-LE, or Bluetooth Low Energy, is a new standard which addresses the power drain of the old Bluetooth technology. Itís also a lot easier to pair with!

How long will my goTenna last?
As with every other electronics product, over time the battery will last a little less and less. It all depends on how much you use your goTenna and how many cycles of charging and discharging you go through. We expect that with normal use, your goTenna should continue to have fantastic battery life for many years. That being said, even if the battery does start to degrade, all it means is that it wonít last as long without a charge, but the goTenna will still work if you can give it at least a little juice.

Can I replace the battery?
Unfortunately not. Weíve designed goTenna to be rugged, which means itís not designed to be pried open. goTenna will cover any defective batteries (happens sometimes!) under our 1-year limited warranty.


Re range; ... from the site again;

Where should I have my goTenna when Iím using it?
You can have it in your pocket, inside your bag, in your hand, or hang it onto something else using the attachment strap. For the best performance in terms of range, however, you should try to attach it externally to gear such as a backpack and try to elevate the device as much as possible.
&
You should know that elevating the goTenna increases its range drastically. Another way to improve your range is to attach it externally to other gear (e.g. a backpack), as opposed to having it at the bottom of a bag.


Range at 6 ft elevation of goTenna;
Open ocean / Desert 3.3miles
Forest / Suburbia 2.6 miles
High density suburbia 1.3 miles.


Note that if you get the device up to 500 ft elevation the ranges increase out to;
Open ocean / Desert 50.5 miles
Forest / Suburbia 49 miles
High density suburbia 27.4 miles.



How can I increase my range?
The further away the goTenna is from your body, and the less obstructed it is by other objects, the better it can transceive. So if youíre in a situation where you want to communicate with people at high range, attach your goTenna to your backpack, for instance.
You can also try to elevate yourself and/or the device, by climbing to higher ground or even hanging goTenna off a tree, to increase your range even further.



Interestingly the manufacturer site has nothing to say about health implications for use of that product.
martym
18/07/2014
10:39:21 PM
On 18/07/2014 Superstu wrote:
>Stu changed his mind.

>I reckon it would be crap for big day out climbing as it only works when
>the following all happen:
>
>- you remember to bring along your phone
>- your phone is charged up
>- your phone is switched on
>- you remember to bring along your gotenna
>- your gotenna is charged up
>- your buddy remembers to bring along their phone
>- your buddy remembers to charge up their phone
>- your buddy has their phone switched on
>- your buddy remembers to bring along their gotenna
>- your buddy's gotenna is charged up
>- there is not a big rock mountain thing between you and your buddy stopping
>the comms
>
>
>Too much pfaff!

What generation do you belong to?
How many climbers don't bring their phones clmibing & don't have a car charger?
If you can remember the boltplates, you can remember a gotenna thingy...
Night before - leave it to charge - heypresto; you're in business...

Superstu
19/07/2014
8:07:32 AM
On 18/07/2014 martym wrote:
>What generation do you belong to?
>How many climbers don't bring their phones clmibing & don't have a car
>charger?
>If you can remember the boltplates, you can remember a gotenna thingy...
>Night before - leave it to charge - heypresto; you're in business...

What generation of nowra gumbies do you belong to? Any real cliff is more than a day's walk from the car.

There are 14 messages in this topic.

 

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