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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

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Poll Option Votes Graph
Single 9 - 9.9mm 50m 1
1% 
Single 10 -10.9mm 50m 10
11% 
Single 11 - 11.9mm 50m 0
 
Single 9 - 9.9mm 60m 16
17% 
Single 10 -10.9mm 60m 39
41% 
Single 11 - 11.9mm 60m 1
1% 
Single 70m+ any diameter 2
2% 
Double ropes 25
27% 

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 39
Author
Preferred Rope Diameter and Length

mousey
13/11/2005
5:35:29 AM
how many pitches do youi do a 30m climb in?
rod
14/11/2005
9:05:18 AM
every pitch i climbed today.

mousey
14/11/2005
9:10:00 AM
is that a real answer???????

hey whitetights, what about when you're abseiling at mnalatia point, then you can onlydo 25m pitches!!
rod
14/11/2005
10:52:06 PM
Pretty much but one was slightly less, it would have been about 28m.
wyt91t
18/11/2005
2:54:37 AM
i have a static 30m from the gym to hook up for top roping beginers on.a 9mm skyline dynamic for canyon use and abseiling which is 50m, then i have my two climbing ropes the 50m and 60m.so if i think it's not enough i usually throw a rope in just in case, mainly when going to new areas too.i did eternity on one fifty and had no probs.

Juffs
18/11/2005
11:54:22 AM
I am curently using a Edelrid Fat Rock 10.5 but Santa is giving me a BLUE WATER LIGHTNING PRO 9.7mm 60M. To my understanding it has the same ratings (falls etc as Edelrid) so pound for pound I win. Does anyone else know the go with the 'Pro'?

wombly
21/11/2005
9:40:59 AM
I am now the proud owner of a pair of 50 m mammut pheonix 8mm doubles, great for mulitpitching and tradding. However, these are essentially useless for sport routes, so it only really works for me as all of my climbing partners have 60m single ropes...
Wendy
25/11/2005
3:25:53 PM
I've used doubles for most of the last 16 years, but a few years ago, I invested in a 9.7mm 60m for versatility. It still looks in impeccable condition, whereas my more recently purchased set of 9mms just got retired. I just can't wean myself off the ease with which you can lace a climb on doubles with minimal rope drag and making desperate clips without having rope out. Being rated as singles for 55 kg, I use them as singles occasionally. I'd have bought a set of 8mms this time round, but my budget can't justify the extra cost.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
15/12/2005
4:43:04 PM
>what we need is one rope to tie them all, on rope to guide them
>one rope to bring them into the darkness and bind them

LOL
Love your humour JCP

Double 65 m 8.8 mm are the bomb!

Paulie
16/12/2005
12:17:55 PM
I voted doubles as that's what I use mostly (trad), however I also have a 60mtr 10.5 that I use quite often when the situation dictates.
Bob Saki
16/12/2005
12:19:38 PM
can you go your whole climbing career without ever using double ropes?
I want to avoid this at all costs...........

IdratherbeclimbingM9
16/12/2005
1:23:18 PM
Yes, but why?

master of drung
16/12/2005
1:46:26 PM
i use a 50m 10.5 rope whick i purchased when my trusty hemp rope wore out, i think i read somewhere about pairing a long (maybe 70m) 10 or 10.5 mm rope with a 8mm of similar length with a aim of having a very flexible set up (eg, long raps, 35m double ropes, very safe 70m doubles, option for single rope or top roping etc) my recollection of reading about this is a bit hazy, does anyone know anything about this idea or offer any opinion on it.
Bob Saki
16/12/2005
1:46:33 PM
seems like a hell of a lot of extra hassle
im sure this is ignorance on my part but carry two ropes to and from crag.
worrying about clipping two ropes to pro
could get confusing................................
maybe you can allay my fears M8 but I want to avoid the fuss and no doubt the expense of an extra rope

nmonteith
16/12/2005
1:53:14 PM
If you do lots of 'adventure' style trad climbing - expecially long multipitch routes then double ropes are
very useful. Being able to do 60m abseils, being able to continue climbing after one rope gets cut (this
has happened to me many times mountaineering) and being able to haul on one rope and belay on the
other is also good. The biggest advtange is being able to have minimal rope drag on wandery and
complex pitches.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
16/12/2005
4:48:14 PM
On 16/12/2005 Bob Saki wrote:
>carry two ropes to and from crag.
Split the load and your climbing partner carries one. Doubles are usually thinner so carrying one is lighter than carrying a full size rope.

>worrying about clipping two ropes to pro
>could get confusing................................
You clip alternately (of sorts), generally keeping one rope on the left and one on the right. Different coloured ropes help the identification process.

>I want to avoid the fuss and no doubt
>the expense of an extra rope
If you climb with a regular partner you end up generally sharing the rack (swinging leads) and often for cash-strapped climbers its a cheaper alternative to buy one of the 'doubles' each; ie sharing the cost of the complete setup.

Paulie
19/12/2005
10:23:42 AM
There is also a definate advantage climbing doubles (or twins) on some sport routes which are poorly bolted. You can clip one rope without having to pull slack out on the other, therefore negating a groundfall/significant fall. One route I have used this tactic on is that grade 26 that goes up the northern arete of the Monolith at Buffalo, it has a very hard to clip 2nd bolt, which should you pull slack then fall, you'll deck for sure.

Other uses are hard scrambling/ski touring/glacier walking where you need only take a single rope and use it for simul-climbing/safety. I prefer to use one of my 8mm x 60mtrs when in the mountains doing the above simply for lightness and the option of 30mtr abseils (as opposed to 15mtr abseils on a 30mtr short line) should it all go tits up.

The rope drag factor Neil is commenting on is perhaps the best reason to buy doubles. It extends your range of movement/wandering on long pitches by a significant margin. For example I can't imagine doing the 2nd pitch (a very wandery 45mtrs) of "The Initiation" at Buffalo without doubles, the drag created by heading right onto the slab at the end would be insane on a single.

Paul
gfdonc
19/12/2005
10:50:20 AM
On 19/12/2005 Paulie wrote:
> You can clip one rope without having
>to pull slack out on the other, therefore negating a groundfall/significant
>fall.

This is definitely an advantage of double ropes.
However one technique that it seems a lot of single-rope climbers are not aware of, or don't use often enough, is to clip first with a full-size sling when in difficulties. That way, you can clip at your waist, and also clip more easily as you can bring the 'biner to the rope rather than the other way around. Once secured, you can then reclip with a normal length draw, and you're only facing a short fall when you pull up some slack.

The extra sling can be left as a backup depending on your level of paranoia about trusting single carabiners. To make it even easier, pre-clip the sling into the rope before moving up, and keep the top biner handy to make it a single-step clip-in.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
19/12/2005
5:06:12 PM
On 19/12/2005 gfdonc wrote:
>However one technique that it seems a lot of single-rope climbers are
>not aware of, or don't use often enough, is to clip first with a full-size
>sling when in difficulties. That way, you can clip at your waist, and
>also clip more easily as you can bring the 'biner to the rope rather than
>the other way around. Once secured, you can then reclip with a normal
>length draw, and you're only facing a short fall when you pull up some
>slack.
>
>The extra sling can be left as a backup depending on your level of paranoia
>about trusting single carabiners. To make it even easier, pre-clip the
>sling into the rope before moving up, and keep the top biner handy to make
>it a single-step clip-in.
This (oldie but a goodie) should be added to the tech tips section of Chocky ...

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 39
There are 39 messages in this topic.

 

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