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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

 Page 2 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 52
Author
calcaneal (heel) fracture from climbing fall
patto
25/09/2012
10:52:35 PM
I also continued climbing while I had my broken foot. I wasn't leading but I could still climb some pretty decent grades with only 1 foot.

Miguel75
25/09/2012
11:19:23 PM
On 25/09/2012 PThomson wrote:
>... Snip...Here's hoping you find the same silver lining to your injury. =)

If all else fails there's always Oxycodone addiction;) It lines everything with happiness... Supposedly;)

ajfclark
Online Now
26/09/2012
7:46:04 AM
Except your colon. It lines that with brick.

Eve
26/09/2012
9:15:53 AM
On 25/09/2012 PThomson wrote:
>I broke my heel 3 years ago in a "rope soloing c--k up" where I decked
>from 6m up. After 2 weeks to get over the worst of it I was back climbing
>indoors one-footed. I also was designated belayer at a climbing competition...
>I'm not too sure why my climbing parter trusted a one-footed belayer who
>leaned on a cruch for support while belaying.
>
>Personally, I'm glad it happened. It was a good life lesson in going just
>that liiiiiitle bit further with safety when I'm rope soloing. And -more
>importantly- climbing one-footed taught me the value of the perfect foot
>placement to achieve the required movement. Before that every climb I did
>was -in some way- distilled down to a variation of climbing a ladder (regardless
>of grade)... Afterwards I learned the value of footwork and body position.
>I think it was a crucial turning point in my climbing at the time.
>
>Here's hoping you find the same silver lining to your injury. =)


yeah, I believe there is some deeper meaning to all this and maybe it'll finally slow me down and start living and climbing more mindfully....
Wendy
26/09/2012
9:53:20 AM
One of the incidents contributing to my distaste for bouldering resulted a fractured calcaneus in 96. I'm not even sure which foot it was anymore. I certainly couldn't tell the difference between them. Mine didn't need surgery, just a half cast. I was later told I was lucky to have seen someone who was not into full casts because otherwise I'd probably have lost some ROM.
Gad
26/09/2012
5:36:34 PM
Thank you for starting this forum. I fractured my left heel on 22/9 and am waiting for my surgery because my foot is too swollen. The doctors said it was a life changing injury and that I would not be able to walk on uneven surfaces again...it would be great to read about a successful recovery from this surgery and share any thoughts about best ways to push through this condition. Good luck and cheers

Doug
26/09/2012
7:09:31 PM
On 26/09/2012 Gad wrote:
>I fractured my left heel on 22/9 and am waiting for my surgery because my foot is too swollen. The doctors said it was a life changing injury and that I would not be able to walk on uneven surfaces again

Uneven surfaces were the biggest problem. I had a lot of pain inside my ankle (above the shattered calcaneus) for 4-5 years when I went bushwalking and trod awkwardly, but it eventually stopped.

Keep your chin up, Gad, and good luck with your recovery.

Cheers

Doug

vwills
26/09/2012
7:10:21 PM
This thread has really reinforced my hate of bouldering and though I dont mind a run out when high in the sky I am a pathetic wimp until I have the second bolt clipped on sports climbs or several bolber bits of gear below me.

A friend broke both his ankles badly (into the joint) falling 5m and was in a wheelchair for weeks but is now back climbing well 2 years later. He does get pain and swelling and probably doesnt like superlong walkins, but with careful footwear choices he can get most places
One Day Hero
26/09/2012
8:25:08 PM
On 25/09/2012 PThomson wrote:
>I broke my heel 3 years ago in a "rope soloing c--k up" where I decked
>from 6m up...................Personally, I'm glad it happened. It was a good life lesson in going just
>that liiiiiitle bit further with safety when I'm rope soloing. And -more
>importantly- climbing one-footed taught me the value of the perfect foot
>placement to achieve the required movement........

O.k., this "cancer is a gift" bullshit has gone far enough! You're glad you fuched up and broke your heel? What the fuch is the matter with you people?

Fuching up and busting your body is dumb and counter productive to the goal of getting out and doing cool stuff. Sure, it can happen to anyone, but it sounds like it never occurred to you clowns that falling a long way onto a hard surface might result in bad times.

?!?!?!
technogeekery
27/09/2012
9:07:11 AM
^ its like a little yappy dog running around in circles and barking at every sound. Not much you can do about it, if you pay it any attention it barks even more.

ajfclark
Online Now
27/09/2012
9:10:47 AM
So when should look at him sternly, hold up a finger and say "UH" until he shuts up and then pat him on the belly and say "Good boy"?

Doug
27/09/2012
9:28:08 AM
On 25/09/2012 PThomson wrote:
>I broke my heel 3 years ago in a "rope soloing c--k up" where I decked
>from 6m up.
>Personally, I'm glad it happened.
>I think it was a crucial turning point in my climbing at the time.
>
Hmmm. I can't quite come to terms with this. There must be better ways to learn how to be a better climber.
While I think ODH's reaction is OTT, I see where he is coming from in terms of busting your body, especially with this particular injury. The calcaneus is a particular odd bone that doesn't heal well. And, while I hope Eve has an excellent recovery, her heel will never be the same as it was before she broke it. It will be painful for a long time, and it's likely there will be complications involving other small bones in the area.
That said, there is no reason why it shouldn't function very well into the future, especially with the initial treatment of screwing all the bits back into place.
Again, good luck Eve. As others have said, work hard at your range of movement.
TonyB
27/09/2012
2:02:35 PM
On 25/09/2012 PThomson wrote:
>>.Personally, I'm glad it happened.

On 26/09/2012 One Day Hero wrote:
> What the fuch is the matter with you people?

We can either be optimists and make the best of a bad situations like PThomson, or be evil, miserable, black hearted, foul mouthed, moronic, pessimists like ODH. Looking on the bright side, at least pessimists are never disappointed. I'm all for optimism.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHPOzQzk9Qo
One Day Hero
27/09/2012
6:36:16 PM
On 27/09/2012 TonyB wrote:
>We can either be optimists and make the best of a bad situations like
>PThomson.........

Really Tony? So if your family were (hypothetically) killed in a horrible accident, would you jump onto Chocky with "I'm glad they're dead, it's a gift really. Sure I miss them, but looking on the bright side, now I can go on all those climbing trips which used to be off limits"?

There's optimism, then there's denialism (seems you're pretty well versed in that ideology), and then there's just plain fuchin' stupid! Being stoked about a serious injury because it somehow helped with climbing technique? That's off the dial.

Comablur
27/09/2012
7:33:07 PM
On 23/09/2012 Eve wrote:
>I suffered several calcaneal fractures (essentially pushing my heel into
>leg bone) from climbing fall. Had surgery last wednesday with some plates
>and screws pushing everything back in place. Looking at the internet, I
>was shocked by the negativity of statements regarding a full recovery ("your
>foot will never be the same again."). I find that ridiculous and was wondering
>if there are some 'good' stories about recovering from calcaneal fracture
>in the climbing community. thanks! Eve

Hi Eve hope all is going well. Thought I would reply to your post as I broke my ankle (in a fall) way back in January 21st 1990 at werribee gorge. I pretty much sent my Tibia and Fibula past the main ankle joint displacing the Talus bone out the back of my foot. Thankfully my skin is reasonable elastic as non of the bones made it out side. The doctor said it was easier to fuse my ankle (not good) or maybe try some pins to stick it all together. After 2 weeks in hospital and 6 months (non load bearing) on crutches I was finally able to take my first steeps. The main problem was with amount of bone movement in the fall and during the operation, which resulted in the removal of a large amount of cartilage (protective layer) from between the bones. This means that when ever I walk or run it is bone rubbing on bone and leads to bruising and inflammation and ultimately stiffness after rest.
In the first ten + years I was able to remain fairly active, running (long distance), walking (multi week), climbing (all styles) etc. In the last 10 or so years, I have had to give up running and I find it painful to do a bush walk of more than 2 days. Climbing is not a problem, only the walk in, descent and walk out, in fact I am considering moving to Spain were it seems that all climbing is at least 10 minutes from the car.
I would suggest that this is a "good story" as I could not imagine doing all this with a fused ankle joint.
I would suggest that this is a "good story" as I can still climb and do a lot of the things I use to do
I would suggest that this is a "good story" as I got a lot of back rubs/wash's from nice nurses whilst staying in hospital.
I would suggest that this is a "good story" because things change in life and you just learn to move with them as they change and you get older (life would be such a bore if things did not change).

I would embrace the moment, except the challenge and get on with life, and disregard all "the negativity of statements regarding a full recovery"

Regards
Cameron

davidn
27/09/2012
7:42:26 PM
On 27/09/2012 One Day Hero wrote:
>There's optimism, then there's denialism

Emo
PThomson
27/09/2012
10:39:57 PM
On 27/09/2012 davidn wrote:
>On 27/09/2012 One Day Hero wrote:
>>There's optimism, then there's denialism
>
>Emo

Valid criticism or not, we all know ODH is a $#!t-stirrer in his deliberately over-the-top responses.

I'm definately not an optimist (those who climb with me will vouch that I'm a pretty notorious pessimist), but as I said -in that particular instance- the cloud DID have a silver lining and it changed my perspective on certain aspects of safety (I've always been safe, but that accident proved that I should never relax in that regard, because its still possible to make mistakes), and also it essentially jump-started what was becoming a stagnant progression on the climbing curve of difficulty.

Are there better ways to learn these things? Of course there bloody well are, but how long might it have been before I learned them. And seriously, what is a few months off (serious) climbing in the face of a jump in both grades and personal outlook. And besides, Humans learn by making mistakes, your mummy might have told you the stove is hot, but until you burned yourself for the first time you never REALLY knew, did you?

I believe that the ultimate positive outweights the negative in that instance, and my hope is that Eve finds the same bit of luck.

I also hope that ODH learns how to correctly parse information from forum posts in a way that permits logic to feed into his interpretation, rather than his obscure subjectivity... But THAT is a real pipe dream.

AFTERWORD: Ironically, yesterday night -after making my previous post- I partially tore my hamstring tendon where it joins onto the pelvis while trying to throw off a very high heel-hook, and am being told that I could well be out of action for 5-7 weeks... All this 2 days before a long weekend, and a Point Perp trip the following weekend. More evidence that Murphey's Law exists.

rightarmbad
27/09/2012
11:26:10 PM
I think ODH's post are straight and to the point.

It's just that a bunch of people get their panties in a knot when confronted with the truth.

Long live ODH, keeping me entertained endlessly as he ousts the truth and reality disabled members of our society.

davidn
28/09/2012
5:56:06 AM
On 27/09/2012 rightarmbad wrote:
>I think ODH's post are straight and to the point.
>
>It's just that a bunch of people get their panties in a knot when confronted
>with the truth.
>
>Long live ODH, keeping me entertained endlessly as he ousts the truth
>and reality disabled members of our society.

Load of tripe RAB. You could paraphrase most of his posts with "you wouldn't think or enjoy that if you knew what I know!"

I can live with emos trying to bring everyone down, but the rudeness (which has massively improved, thanks again mods!) was what did and does get angry responses, not some kind of relevatory 'truth'.

Finding something good about a broken foot is not fooling yourself. My footwork improved after mine as well. I could write a mopey post about how sitting around doing nothing sucks instead?

Eve
28/09/2012
9:48:21 AM
On 28/09/2012 davidn wrote:
>On 27/09/2012 rightarmbad wrote:
>>I think ODH's post are straight and to the point.
>>
>>It's just that a bunch of people get their panties in a knot when confronted
>>with the truth.
>>
>>Long live ODH, keeping me entertained endlessly as he ousts the truth
>>and reality disabled members of our society.
>
>Load of tripe RAB. You could paraphrase most of his posts with "you wouldn't
>think or enjoy that if you knew what I know!"
>
>I can live with emos trying to bring everyone down, but the rudeness (which
>has massively improved, thanks again mods!) was what did and does get angry
>responses, not some kind of relevatory 'truth'.
>
>Finding something good about a broken foot is not fooling yourself. My
>footwork improved after mine as well. I could write a mopey post about
>how sitting around doing nothing sucks instead?


Hi guys,
this post has morphed into a lot more than just the physiology of a broken heel and more into how to cope with things that restrict us from doing what we love - which is good (the morphing of the post, I mean)! Because, at least I for myself, can't look at the accident without also thinking (and sorry about the esoteric new-age babble) that there may be some lesson from the universe for me and that forcing me to stop and realign my thoughts is one of the benefits coming out of lying low for a while.
Maybe just a bit of background: when I broke my hip 1,5 years ago (freak accident when rim of mountainbike tire failed and the whole bike gave way under me), it was the first time that I was not only forced into immobility but were also completely dependent on other people (luckily, I could wipe my own arse!), but it shattered my whole identify which had been all about me running around, doing things, being strong and fit. So, all i had were my bloody thoughts, racing around in my head. long story cut short, it allowed me to realise a few things in my life that were just not going right (mainly my job) and make a few changes to try to live more true to myself. maybe there is some more to it now. at least, I'm reading a lot and (yeah, you can laugh) meditate and guess what - it helps as much with a positive outlook as all your posts (ODH's included). Thanks!!!

 Page 2 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 52
There are 52 messages in this topic.

 

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