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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

 Page 2 of 6. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 102
Author
Arapiles Bees
patto
26/03/2007
2:59:22 PM
Enough is enough! I have had it with these motherf&#king bees in this motherf&#king crack!"

BlstFrnc
26/03/2007
10:25:35 PM
Yep, Corker of a climb and will be a lot more enjoyable now that the nest is gone!

Cheers.... I copped a sting on the eyelid last time I was there and it sort of spoilt my style ;)


robbie
27/03/2007
10:58:22 AM
First things first.

Get location data for known hives.

Post info to make people aware. VERY IMPORTANT

Imported Corcasion and Italian bee's are TOXIC. Italian's are a bit more aggressive. The consequences can be dia if a hasty retreat is impeaded. Even more so if the victim is allergic. A swarm in a standard Super (Bee box) normally houses around 30,000 bees. Think about that figure.

Bees are more hostile when the weather is changing

The Bees natural ememy. Bears, whom by the way have lots of hair for protection. We don't.

Bees Swarming is when a new queen emerges and decides too head off with a group of followers from the original hive. Thus creating a new hive at another location.

I'm happy if people wan't to e-mail me locations for assessment and recomendation on eradication or removal. Who doesn't like honey on their crumpets. No garantees that a new swarm will not take up residance. Position, position, position.

This a serious undertaking and should be approached in a proffessional manner.

Cheers

Robbie
Access T CliffCare
24/04/2007
12:05:23 AM

After consultation with the Ranger at Arapiles, the VCC will be starting a database of known hive locations. One of its members has been a beekeeper for 30 years and is keen to share his knowledge and work on the database to assist the Ranger and ParksVic in establishing the best way to eradicate the bees. This will also be useful in warning people, the areas where bees might be a problem. With regards to the eradication, this is a serious job that should not be undertaken without the consent and involvement of Parks.

If you know of a location of a hive please forward on this information to vccbeehive@yahoo.com.au Information such as area, crag, climb, location on climb, how long the hive has been in situ etc.

Hopefully we can help to get this problem under control.

Tracey Skinner
VCC Access and Environment Officer

Sabu
24/04/2007
10:12:36 AM
Im assuming this be availible to the general public, if so where or how will it be availible?

vwills
24/04/2007
12:03:03 PM
There was bees in Upper yesterday gully on the climb to the L of fever pitch. We were on Blue Hawaii, but could hear the frantic discussion of the guys on that route about getting bees up their shorts.
kieranl
Online Now
24/04/2007
8:47:18 PM
On 24/04/2007 Access T wrote:
>
>After consultation with the Ranger at Arapiles, the VCC will be starting
>a database of known hive locations. One of its members has been a beekeeper
>for 30 years and is keen to share his knowledge and work on the database
>to assist the Ranger and ParksVic in establishing the best way to eradicate
>the bees. This will also be useful in warning people, the areas where
>bees might be a problem. With regards to the eradication, this is a serious
>job that should not be undertaken without the consent and involvement of
>Parks.
>
To save you copying and pasting, just click on this link :
VCC Beehive Database
to send Bee info to the VCC
Access T CliffCare
26/04/2007
9:25:38 AM
On 24/04/2007 Sabu wrote:
>Im assuming this be availible to the general public, if so where or how
>will it be availible?

At this point we are gathering all the details of hive locations, but yes, the information will be available to the public and I shall let you know how to access it as soon as we have it organized. More than likely it will be via the vcc website www.vicclimb.org.au on the cliffcare page. This way, at least people can make an informed decision climbing on a route with a beehive -important for all but especially those who might already suffer from allergies.

Thanks Kieran for that. That does make it a lot easier. My grasp of technology is far from extensive!
TLockwood
26/04/2007
11:42:27 AM
looks like your doing a power of work Tracey, thanks very much!
kieranl
Online Now
13/05/2007
9:37:09 PM
Here's an image of Right side of Tiger Wall indicating location of bees on Shtarde and adjacent to Shaggy's Route.
I went and checked them out today (carefully dressed) and the bees are very active and aggressive here. The bees are so close to Shaggy's route that it would be very unwise to repeat that route until the bees are dealt with.

Access T CliffCare
25/05/2007
12:28:29 AM
Hi All,

There is a database of hive locations and their status on the VCC website www.vicclimb.org.au Just check this to see when they have been eradicated and keep the information coming in if you notice any new ones. Hopefully we will be confirming a couple more reports in the next few weeks and a couple more for eradication.

Thanks

Tracey Skinner
TLockwood
25/05/2007
9:25:15 AM
Top work Tracey, thanks very much for organising this database!

Zebedee
25/05/2007
2:33:10 PM
I note that Steve Monks, Hugh Widdowson and Meg Sleeman are to recieve a bravery award for rescuing Noddy. The photo of Steve makes him look like a victim of a gangland slaying.
(I think that the killing of feral bees needs to be carefully thought through as these bees (non-farmed) contribute over 2 billion dollars to the agricultural economy of Australia. So I am glad that the risk to climbers is reduced but it would be a shame not to balance this against the impact on the farm economy)
rod
25/05/2007
10:53:46 PM
On 25/05/2007 Zebedee wrote:
>(I think that the killing of feral bees needs to be carefully thought
>through as these bees (non-farmed) contribute over 2 billion dollars to
>the agricultural economy of Australia. So I am glad that the risk to climbers
>is reduced but it would be a shame not to balance this against the impact
>on the farm economy)

Given how commercial bee activities are undertaken, I very much doubt the contribution to the economy is threatened by rather than being preserved by the "killing". There is also only a very limited area affected by the feral bee killing referred to in this thread; an area prized by climbers and hikers who also make a valuable contribution to the australian economy.

It also appears careful thought is occurring if you care to read these:

http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/publications/bees/future.html#assessment

http://www.rirdc.gov.au/reports/HBE/07-059.pdf

I'm a little sceptical of your cited $2bn contribution to the farming economy as the value of the honey production is only $50m to $70m per annum. Even with 10 multiple effect for suppliers and other bee based products I can only get to $500m to $700m.

Zebedee
26/05/2007
10:22:23 AM
Nought to do with honey. It's the contribution to Ag production of feral bees as a result of their pollination of crops. The source is a CSIRO chief scientist who discussing the potential impact of the syndrome that is causing hives to die suddenly in the US.

verticalfun
26/05/2007
10:40:44 AM
Have to agree with you there rod, the bee's are threatening the farmed bee's that are at the base of mount
arapiles, competing with the recreational climbers and walkers, this is a no brainer for parks, who want
the ferals gone, as they don't contribute to the income of the park, quite the opposite infact, if you look at
funds spent on rescue for climbers affected, or walkers that won't go to an area known to have feral bee's
present.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
28/05/2007
8:17:52 AM
I heard that the feral bees kill the ones that are good for agriculture, but are not as good for agricultural purposes as a replacement.
I heard this on ABC radio and it was to do with the USA syndrome of sudden hive deaths. Zebedee is right about the $ impact on pollinated crops that we all (incidentally/indirectly? ) rely upon. Honey production is just the tip of that $-iceburg.

I don't know if Australian native bees are good pollinators as compared to the possibility that pommie ones were originally imported?
Where did the feral bees originally come from?
kieranl
Online Now
28/05/2007
10:16:41 PM
On 28/05/2007 M9iswhereitsat wrote:
>I don't know if Australian native bees are good pollinators as compared
>to the possibility that pommie ones were originally imported?
>Where did the feral bees originally come from?
My understanding is that native bees are specialised for pollinating some native plants which introduced bees do not pollinate.
rod
29/05/2007
8:35:15 PM
On 26/05/2007 Zebedee wrote:
>Nought to do with honey. It's the contribution to Ag production of feral
>bees as a result of their pollination of crops. The source is a CSIRO chief
>scientist who discussing the potential impact of the syndrome that is causing
>hives to die suddenly in the US.

Thanks Zeb & M9, I've sourced and read the ABC transcript. Specific issues on the Araps ferals aside, the pollination topic itself is a surprisingly interesting subject.

Zebedee
29/07/2007
11:07:55 AM
On 29/05/2007 rod wrote:
>Thanks Zeb & M9, I've sourced and read the ABC transcript. Specific issues
>on the Araps ferals aside, the pollination topic itself is a surprisingly
>interesting subject.
More here now on the role of the feral bee
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/backgroundbriefing/
probably only of interest to the bee obssessed.

 Page 2 of 6. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 102
There are 102 messages in this topic.

 

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