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Chockstone Forum - Trip Reports

Tells Us About Your Latest Trip!

 Page 5 of 5. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 96
Author
Killiecrankie, Flinders Island

nmonteith
24/01/2012
5:37:51 PM
On 24/01/2012 superstu wrote:
>Why wasn't the old Killikrankie info passed onto thesarvo for inclusion
>there instead?

ha ha ha! You've forgotten about the politics of Tasmania....

Superstu
24/01/2012
5:48:58 PM
On 24/01/2012 nmonteith wrote:
>ha ha ha! You've forgotten about the politics of Tasmania....

Oh, are there divisions in the family?
One Day Hero
24/01/2012
11:01:43 PM
On 24/01/2012 onsight wrote:
>
>I agree Sirocco is hard and I see that I've given it 27 in my captions
>because I don't think that it's 26 for starters... but I disagree the rest
>-- height makes a massive difference on this one. Lynn tried all out dynoing
>for ages, with and without the rack on, then tried to climb around the
>dyno using some minuscule edges...

Yeah, but what you're dynoing for is utter shit! Have you done the thing? You'd have to be 7 foot tall to do it off low footers, and when I try it off the high footers I'm starting the dyno with my elbow already below my knee. I think 5 foot is probably too short to do it unless you're a super freak, but extra height beyond a certain point makes it harder again.

If she could have found a way at grade
>29 or 30 for her, then I'm sure she would have. Unfortunately Taipan is
>particularly lacking in intermediates and makes some of the routes there
>a hell of a lot harder if you are shorter.

Yep, there's a lot of routes on that wall which are not designed for shortarses, tough shit.
>
One Day Hero
24/01/2012
11:08:08 PM
On 24/01/2012 mikllaw wrote:
>Lighter is good all the time......
>
........until it starts sapping your strength! Boulderers can often get away with not being as whippet thin as enduro-climbers, just like sprinters are more chunky than distance runners. Mountaineers are rarely stickmen (except that mandolin playing Belgian freak)
Tastrad
30/01/2012
11:33:55 AM
Coincidentally Bob McMahon and I and my two kids just got back from a week on Flinders Island. The rock quality of the various climbs we did was superb and the guidebook delivered us to our chosen climbs no worries at all. In defense of the guidebook, the Flinders Island section is just one chapter of a guide covering all the areas in Northern Tas not covered by our other guides. So for $42 you not only get the only available guide to Flinders plus a comprehensive guide to 11 other crags, including the only full guide to Hillwood. In 2003 we spent 7 days researching the guide and visited, scrub bashed to every cliff on the island. There are about 10 other crags in addition to the Killiecrankie area. Using Craddock's handwritten notes we methodically went left to right along the cliffline and we were able to find the vast majority of the routes and take photo topos of many of them. I researched all the magazines, climbing club newsletters, internet to find all the new routes done since Steve Craddocks interim guide. Then our updated version of the guide and topos were sent to Steve Craddock, Wayne Maher, Ian Sedgman and Stuart Willis - the Victorian pioneers of the area - who went over the manuscript and topos to check their accuracy. So this was far more than simply retyping old notes. This was a well researched and thorough guide. If we were able to locate most of the hundreds of routes using the handwritten notes, then it should be easier to locate them using our guide with topos. So if its crap, thats only Wendy's opinion. Flinders is a fabulous destination - the climbing is outstanding on some of the best coastal granite in Australia, plus bushwalking, amazing beaches all to yourself, fishing and the best vanilla slices ever at the bakery.
robertsonja
30/01/2012
3:47:30 PM
In the next version of guide I would prefer colour photos and some indication whether the vanilla slice is GF or not. I don't want to get off route and end up with a sore tummy.

rodw
30/01/2012
4:56:10 PM
Can you review your own guide??...if you cant follow your own guide there would be issues.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
30/01/2012
8:23:25 PM
On 20/01/2012 Tastrad wrote:
>The guide in Climb Northern Tas is a direct copy of the old interim guide
>by Steve Craddock and was acknowledged as such. If it wern't for our guide,
>there would be no readily available guide to Flinders at all. All stars,
>descriptions of routes, quality of climbs, etc is the work of Craddock/Maher
>and others who put together the handwritten interim guide that I typed
>out word for word. So if putting the guide out was dumb, then its better
>than having no information at all, or you could ring steve Craddock and
>ask for his handwritten guide next time you go there. (snip)

then on 30/01/2012 Tastrad wrote:
>Coincidentally Bob McMahon and I and my two kids just got back from a week
>on Flinders Island. The rock quality of the various climbs we did was superb
>and the guidebook delivered us to our chosen climbs no worries at all.
>(snip)
>Using Craddock's handwritten notes
>we methodically went left to right along the cliffline and we were able
>to find the vast majority of the routes and take photo topos of many of
>them. I researched all the magazines, climbing club newsletters, internet
>to find all the new routes done since Steve Craddocks interim guide. Then
>our updated version of the guide and topos were sent to Steve Craddock,
>Wayne Maher, Ian Sedgman and Stuart Willis - the Victorian pioneers of
>the area - who went over the manuscript and topos to check their accuracy.
>So this was far more than simply retyping old notes. This was a well researched
>and thorough guide. If we were able to locate most of the hundreds of routes
>using the handwritten notes, then it should be easier to locate them using
>our guide with topos. (snip)

Regarding Killiecrankie, the above two posts seem to be at odds with each other.
Consistency?
~> ... so which version is it going to be Tastrad?
duglash
10/02/2012
4:16:02 PM
Despite crossing four stars out of the guidebook on the first day I really liked Killiecrankie. The place is stunning, the weather went from idyllic to wild, the swimming is lovely and the climbing is – not as good as the first ascentionists reckon – but it's interesting and adventurous and there's a bunch of great looking new routes to do.

I think the problem with the guidebook is largely one of expectation – these days one expects glossy guides with topos to be accurate – the guide book writers acknowledge that the guide is a compilation of existing guides with little verification, but it looks like a more accurate guide than it is. Treat it as a dog-eared compilation of hand drawn notes and you'll be right. Having written a guide and knowing how much work it is and how little money you make in return I'm more sympathetic than Wendy, but more descent information than the scant amount provided would be welcome.

I'll write up the notes from my guidebook when I have time which should save future visitors some skin and swearing at thick bush.

You'd have to be a drooling idiot to deny that reachy routes exist, and some crags have more of them than others. The area often makes distinct holds with blank bits inbetween and I often found myself stretched out on Flinders cruxes thinking “Wonder how Enga/Wendy's going to do that?” - I'm 5'11 with a 6'2 span, they are both considerably less.

If you are casting aspersions on the diameter of Wendy's ovaries you should have been at Barbican Rocks the other week when she led a 19 that put anything at Flinders into the shade, it wins as the most horrifically loose and unpleasant climbing experience I have ever had, and I was only seconding. I wouldn't lead it even to get away from a loud, hypocritical, brittle, macho, OCD christian, my least favourite type of dangerous wildlife.

And climberman, my hair does not look funny, it looks cool. I can't believe you can't see that... maybe you need a second pair of glasses? (Hi Jules, I's good, nice to see you out there!)
Tastrad
13/02/2012
8:51:40 AM
Little Verification? As I said, we found most of the routes using Craddocks old handwritten notes - we went left to right along every cliff and fund most of the routes and photographed and made topos accordingly. What is the male version of a whingeing cow?

Eduardo Slabofvic
13/02/2012
9:39:36 AM
Tastrad?????????????
duglash
13/02/2012
9:53:05 AM
It's gold, gold for Eduardo!

Doug
13/02/2012
12:11:35 PM
On 30/01/2012 Tastrad wrote:
>Coincidentally Bob McMahon and I and my two kids just got back from a week
>on Flinders Island. The rock quality of the various climbs we did was superb
>and the guidebook delivered us to our chosen climbs no worries at all.

Hmmm. According to Bob you only did the one climb.

>In defense of the guidebook, the Flinders Island section is just one chapter
>of a guide covering all the areas in Northern Tas not covered by our other
>guides. So for $42 you not only get the only available guide to Flinders
>plus a comprehensive guide to 11 other crags, including the only full guide
>to Hillwood.

That's fair enough Gerry: the guide provides clear and accurate info to a number of places not covered in other guides. However, it might have been good to add a rider at the start of the Flinders section was largely based on Craddock's guide, that your photo topos matched those descriptions but that the authors (i.e. you and Bob) had done few of the routes yourselves. Also, having the "original pioneers" go over the manuscript is still relying on very little actual reviewing of data.

Re Flinders being a fabulous destination for all the other reasons you list I'd concur wholeheartedly and would love to go back sometime.

Tastrad
14/02/2012
9:47:28 AM
2 climbs actually: Faraway Places at Killiecrankie - lovely 18 corner with a perfect handcrack through a roof to thhe top of a pinnacle. And a spekky grade 18 face climb at the Docks

dino
14/02/2012
8:48:20 PM
Gerry, saw a recent shot of you up on the Ben, man you are looking a bit wild with the hair and beard!

I have never climbed at Flinders Island so cant comment on the climbing - maybe one day I will get there, my two daughters have just started climbing/bouldering and I am sure they would love the place, and not just for the climbing.

stugang
14/02/2012
9:28:46 PM
Male whinging cow....hmmm...

thats gotta be "Raging Bull" thats pretty cool huh? Worth flipping a username for hey Doug?

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There are 96 messages in this topic.

 

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