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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

Author
advice on runouts
mikllaw
13-Nov-2017
6:34:09 PM
R golds post is gold:-
https://www.mountainproject.com/forum/topic/113815496/being-comfortable-with-run-outs-and-r-rated-climbs
One Day Hero
13-Nov-2017
7:51:27 PM
Nice. That is such a perfect induction speech for booroomba newbs, I think I'll just pinch it.

freesolo
17-Nov-2017
1:43:31 AM
if anyone actually wants tips on runouts ???

when sport climbing, assuming it's not a groundfall, and i am confident at the grade, i skip the first bolt, and try to skip every other bolt, just to train my brain to read the rock, and not read the bolts. if you are 25m off the ground, and 6 metres to the anchor, skip the last bolt and climb like you're free soloing.

so when you do face a runout for real, you have a least a little experience outside your comfort zone.

Goshen
17-Nov-2017
4:40:24 AM
Not sure about every second bolt, but totally agree with skipping the first bolt, and sometimes last bolt on some sport climbs... there are so many (thinking mostly NSW) that are over-bolted... A grade 14 start (with bolt) into a 23 or something.... did it really need that bolt 2.5m off the ground?

rodw
17-Nov-2017
5:51:34 AM
I like my ankles in one piece and rock breaks..so in my opinion yeah..but if you want to skip it go right ahead...really depends on possible fall zone not grade of climbing in my opinion as its rock and shit happens.

gnaguts
17-Nov-2017
8:53:51 PM
Eduardo my bold friend, could you please share some of your hard won experience on this topic with us?

As you know, I tend to overprotect my climbs, prefer wide cracks even off-width, and generally dislike smaller protection such as RPs, even at Arapiles!

Eduardo Slabofvic
18-Nov-2017
5:07:42 AM
Don't fall off
Potex
18-Nov-2017
7:24:56 AM
Its a great post, but I believe the adventure of heading into the relative unknown and pitting your skills against nature and accepting run-outs is alive and well in Victoria. Thanks to the likes of yourself miklaw and many other pioneers in vic the ethos remains bold and sandbagged and I love it that way.


If you started your climbing career at Arapiles at grade 5 on tip toe and worked your way up through the grades without skipping any taking in all the starred routes you will get a great education in run-out climbing and how to deal with it.
BA
18-Nov-2017
10:11:57 AM
On 18-Nov-2017 Potex wrote:

>If you started your climbing career at Arapiles at grade 5 on tip toe
>and worked your way up through the grades without skipping any taking in
>all the starred routes you will get a great education in run-out climbing
>and how to deal with it.

Why, back in my day it was graded Very Difficult (VD) or grade 3. I guess people couldn't cope with the runouts and it was upgraded. ;-)
Potex
18-Nov-2017
8:24:28 PM
I wasnt saying tiptoe is runout, just a place to start.

If you start at tiptoe and did all the starred routes at araps up to Auto Da Fe you will get an education in runouts and how to deal with them.

gnaguts
18-Nov-2017
9:13:35 PM
On 18-Nov-2017 Potex wrote:
>I wasnt saying tiptoe is runout, just a place to start.
>
>If you start at tiptoe and did all the starred routes at araps up to Auto
>Da Fe you will get an education in runouts and how to deal with them.

or , you’d crap your undies and give up climbing ?

Ay BA what do you reckon with your back in the day viewpoint , rough guess , of all those you know of that dropped outa climbing , would you say runouts were a major contrib factor? Care to give it a percent factor?
BA
19-Nov-2017
8:50:01 AM
On 18-Nov-2017 gnaguts wrote:

>Ay BA what do you reckon with your back in the day viewpoint , rough guess
>, of all those you know of that dropped outa climbing , would you say runouts
>were a major contrib factor? Care to give it a percent factor?

I don't think it was an issue back then, it was part of 'climbing'. The first time I did Bard was with 5 pieces of gear, all slings, with home made 'nuts' made from brass hexagon rod of different sizes (on 3 of the slings) and made in the machine shop where my father worked. Take out one for each belay and you had 3 slings to protect each pitch if you could find somewhere to use them. I seem to recall there was no gear on pitch 3. Even if you were a "gear freak" back then you wouldn't have had much more gear, and if it was it probably would have been mild steel pitons and you would have 5-6 of those.

If the beginners got through the "beginners course" they normally hung around the climbing scene for 2-5 years before moving on to something else like careers, family etc. The runouts were usually on 'easier' ground and were just part of climbing. I'm not aware of anybody giving up climbing because of runouts.
PeterW
19-Nov-2017
7:21:49 PM
On 19-Nov-2017 BA wrote:
> I seem to recall there was no gear on pitch 3.

I was luckier - by the time I did it there were real hexes. (Regular hexagons, none of this new fangled "hexcentric" gear!) But wasn't there a sling runner of some sort (possibly a thread) in the middle of pitch 3? Of course, you might have only had rope slings and I suspect you'd need a tape sling!

On the other hand, I can imagine the pitch 2 traverse being hard to protect with your rack!
BA
20-Nov-2017
8:02:30 AM
On 19-Nov-2017 PeterW wrote:

>But wasn't there a sling runner
>of some sort (possibly a thread) in the middle of pitch 3? Of course, you
>might have only had rope slings and I suspect you'd need a tape sling!

They were rope slings but I did have some tape slings the next time I did it and I did feel more comfortable.

>On the other hand, I can imagine the pitch 2 traverse being hard to protect
>with your rack!

I think I had something at, or near, the start of the traverse and that is when I found what real rope drag was.
kieranl
20-Nov-2017
9:30:25 AM
On 20-Nov-2017 BA wrote:
>On 19-Nov-2017 PeterW wrote:
>
>>But wasn't there a sling runner
>>of some sort (possibly a thread) in the middle of pitch 3? Of course,
>you
>>might have only had rope slings and I suspect you'd need a tape sling!
>
>They were rope slings but I did have some tape slings the next time I
>did it and I did feel more comfortable.
>
>>On the other hand, I can imagine the pitch 2 traverse being hard to protect
>>with your rack!
>
>I think I had something at, or near, the start of the traverse and that
>is when I found what real rope drag was.

There was a rope-sling thread runner at the start of the traverse where two bits of rock almost met but not quite - No 3 I think (roughly equivalent to 9mm). I remember a thread runner low on the third pitch but on subsequent ascents realised that the rock was loose.

No stories of bivvying in a cardboard box?

PeterW
20-Nov-2017
12:29:27 PM
On 20-Nov-2017 kieranl wrote:
>No stories of bivvying in a cardboard box?

A cardboard box? Luxury! That was for the posh climbers!

Keenas
20-Nov-2017
7:03:16 PM
Advice on runouts.... keep on smiling

There are 17 messages in this topic.

 

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