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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 28
Author
Grampians or Mt Arapiles for first time top rope

Garrath
19/04/2013
9:13:38 PM
Google it is.....

Foot overuse diseases in rock climbing: an epidemiologic study.
Buda R, Di Caprio F, Bedetti L, Mosca M, Giannini S.
Source
Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute - II Orthopedic Clinic, Bologna, Italy.
Abstract
Background: Literature examining the incidence of foot diseases in rock climbing is limited to traumatic injuries. We examined a large sample of climbers, assessed the chronic diseases of the foot, and correlated them with foot morphology, shoe type, and type of climbing practiced. Methods: Between May 1 and September 30, 2009, 144 climbers (mean age, 31.7 years) were examined to analyze the effect of rock climbing on the various foot diseases found at the time of the evaluation. Results: Eighty-six percent of the climbers were affected by a pathologic condition. Nail disease was found in 65.3% of patients, followed by recurrent ankle sprains (27.8%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (19.4%), Achilles tendinitis (12.5%), metatarsalgia (12.5%), and plantar fasciitis (5.6%). Male sex, the use of high-type shoes, the high degree of climbing difficulty, and the competitive level were often related to the onset of foot diseases. Climbing shoes are usually smaller than common footwear. This "shoe-size reduction" averaged 2.3 sizes, forcing the foot into a supinated and cavus posture that favors lateral instability. The posterior edge of the shoe aperture produces increased pressure on the heel, with retrocalcaneal bursitis. Conclusions: Overuse foot diseases related to rock climbing are particularly frequent and debilitating. Detailed knowledge of these diseases and their predisposing factors may help us implement effective preventive or therapeutic measures, including changes in the type of climbing, correction of body weight, degree of difficulty, footwear, orthoses, and measures that maximize the support of the foot to the ground.
Reluctant
19/04/2013
9:33:26 PM
65 point 3 ( very large sample set I assume) are standard filthy non washing in grown toe nail jam picking young male pines residing sample set. Only to be used as the control group in a feral animal eradication program. Biggies on list Achilles tendinitis and pf.

As for fascia description - spot on. Pf however has become generic term to cover group/area issue

IdratherbeclimbingM9
20/04/2013
8:28:08 AM
On 19/04/2013 Garrath wrote:
>Google it is.....
>
>Foot overuse diseases in rock climbing: (snip)

Key word in my opinion, and hardly a beginner issue...
Wendy
20/04/2013
8:36:21 AM
Bugger google, I thought i'd just go straight to asking a podiatrist who climbs.

Conclusion: arch support is really supporting the talonavicular joint, not the plantar fascia. In order to support the plantar fascia, you would need a really really stiff sole and maybe a plantar fascial groove in it.

Besides the obvious that most beginner shoes are not shaped. So they don't really have any more arch support than your sneakers. In fact, I'd hazard a guess runners are far more designed to support than climbing shoes. Particularly not the basic and well worn pairs you are likely to be able to hire.

From my experience, climbing with out shoes, or in a simple, soft pair of shoes builds up muscles around your feet. When you get into an ultra shaped, stiff shoe, the shoe does all the work and your foot gets lazy. Surely that can't be good for it?

As for that survey - I don't know that toenail fungus and turned ankles are particularly climbing shoe related, rather just grot related and bouldering/walking on uneven ground related.

nmonteith
20/04/2013
9:13:48 AM
Dunlop Volleys are $20 at Kmart.

ajfclark
20/04/2013
9:21:58 AM
I'm pretty sure they cost a little more than that last time I bought a pair (up to $40 in a couple of cases from memory). Darn hipsters making them cool.

[Edit: Big W lists plain ones at $25 for kids and $28 for adults. ]
Zensurfer
26/04/2013
6:53:31 PM
I have 15m cordelette and another shorter cordelette, plenty of slings, and biners. I ordered a full range of nuts and hexes but won't be here until a couple weeks. I want to go this weekend. I know there are anchors up there and rocks i can sling.

Can I setup a tope rope without any natural pro gear I researched there is anchors every now and then at the top but there is only one bolt, not two.

Any insight?

IdratherbeclimbingM9
26/04/2013
8:46:29 PM
On 26/04/2013 Zensurfer wrote:
>I have 15m cordelette and another shorter cordelette, plenty of slings,
>and biners. I ordered a full range of nuts and hexes but won't be here
>until a couple weeks. I want to go this weekend. I know there are anchors
>up there and rocks i can sling.
>
>Can I setup a tope rope without any natural pro gear I researched there
>is anchors every now and then at the top but there is only one bolt, not
>two.
>
>Any insight?

I have never been there, however I have set up top ropes at many locations, and most times nuts and hexes, etc are not necessary (in my opinion), as trees and boulder size rocks usually make excellent anchors if you have enough spare rope or slings to use them.
Be sure to get the top anchor point for the toprope (usually reversed krabs for redundancy), over the edge, and pad whatever connects it to the main anchors to prevent abrasion...

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 28
There are 28 messages in this topic.

 

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