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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

Rave About Your Rack Please do not post retail SPAM.

Author
Bard History
uayeb
4/04/2009
5:57:07 PM
This locking beiner was used on the first ascent of the Bard.


Olbert
5/04/2009
10:48:26 PM
Do we get any more information? Is there any story behind this or evidence it was used on the first accent of bard? Or are you just gonna now attempt to put that on ebay and sell it, using this forum as evidence for your claim?

BigMike
6/04/2009
12:15:14 AM

Nah it'll only sell if someone can see Jesus' face in the rust pattern..

masterofrup
6/04/2009
8:00:11 AM
i hate this sort of shit but shuffle the letters and u ebay

Superstu
6/04/2009
8:27:23 AM
Maybe I can put Jim Newlands up for auction on ebay too.

tnd
6/04/2009
9:06:56 AM
It's not a biner, it's a maillon.
patto
6/04/2009
9:29:49 AM
On 6/04/2009 tnd wrote:
>It's not a biner, it's a maillon.

How is this not an oval screwgate caribiner???
martin saint
6/04/2009
10:55:43 AM
Yeah I can confirm that this "not a biner, maillon" was indeed used by Jim Newlands on the first ascent of the Bard.
He gave it, along with a bunch of old pins (also used on Bard) to myself and a couple of mates last Thursday night as a gift to display in the Melbourne University Mountaineering Club clubrooms.
He (very generously) figured he wasn't getting any use out of them and members might be interested in having a look.
We in turn figured Chockstoners might be interested in having a look (hey it's no less interesting than 99% of the stuff that goes on this forum)
Jim also made us a mean curry dinner - thanks Jim :)
What surprised me is that despite its somewhat rusty appearance the action on it is perfect - it screws and unscrews totally smooth - you could use it today (if it wasn't a million years old and it didn't weigh a tonne)

P.S. Thanks for your cynicism but we have no intention of selling the gear. Also if you want to sell Jim on ebay I suggest listing his curry making skills - he made five different curries identified by region.


tnd
6/04/2009
11:02:11 AM
I stand corrected. The resolution on my crappy old laptop meant I failed to see the hinge. On my work PC I now recognise it in all its glory...

IdratherbeclimbingM9
6/04/2009
1:15:01 PM
On 6/04/2009 martin saint wrote:
>Yeah I can confirm that this "not a biner, maillon" was indeed used by
>Jim Newlands on the first ascent of the Bard.
(snip)
>What surprised me is that despite its somewhat rusty appearance the action
>on it is perfect - it screws and unscrews totally smooth - you could use
>it today (if it wasn't a million years old and it didn't weigh a tonne)

It is a Stubai oval karabiner made from steel and believe it or not, quite popular in the mid 1960's as they are considerably lighter than the large 'D''s made by the same company! For a little while it seemed to me that they were all that was commercially available in this country.
With a bit of wire brushing it would clean up nicely, but for those into history it is probably better with the patina left intact to enhance its 'value'.

>you could use it today (if it wasn't a million years old and it didn't weigh a tonne)

I have a few of them, and I still use them for setting top-ropes when introducing beginners to climbing, and also for the odd piton-brake-bar abseil ...
I consider their weight to be good 'training' for multiday climbing!

An interesting thing I noted in early days about Stubai steel karabiner manufacturing process was that they stored and shifted their floor stock by a small tractor, (or maybe a forklift fitted with a tractor style bucket on front)? In any event I saw footage of this machine scooping up large piles of karabiners off the floor and dumping them in another location within the factory. It put an end to my early concerns about whether or not a steel krab was still 'good' if dropped from short heights while in use!

masterofrup
6/04/2009
6:38:28 PM
On 6/04/2009 martin saint wrote:
>

>P.S. Thanks for your cynicism but we have no intention of selling the
>gear. Also if you want to sell Jim on ebay I suggest listing his curry
>making skills - he made five different curries identified by region.

unable to explain why but this gave me the best laugh ive had for weeks thanks I also promise faithfully to never try my hand at conspiracy hiding anagrams again I knew no good would come of it.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/04/2009
11:43:46 AM
>conspiracy hiding anagrams

... seemed reasonable to me.

There are 12 messages in this topic.

 

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