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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 24
Author
Sue Fear

Romfrantic
29/05/2006
1:09:33 PM
Oh gosh, this is horrible news :-(

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/top-climber-in-crevasse-plunge/2006/05/29/1148754915886.html

Deeply saddened by this. My condolences to the family and friends.

anthonyk
29/05/2006
1:13:40 PM
yes i was amazed to see that, i went to the smh web site about the other news stories only to find a big picture of her on the front page. very sad to hear.


mousey
29/05/2006
1:16:22 PM
been a sad week in the mountains :(
my deepest condolences to the friends & family of this amazing woman

Alex
29/05/2006
1:18:22 PM
More bad news. :(

But argh at the article:

awarded an Order of Australia in 2005 for her achievements in mountaining

Super Saiyan
29/05/2006
1:25:40 PM
Not to diss mountaineering/mountaineers or Sue or Lincoln, but why the hell would anyone take up mountaineering? Its like a sport for those who have a death wish! At least with free climbing you have a certain amount of control, but in the mountains you are at the whim of mother nature, and she can be a right bitch...

mousey
29/05/2006
1:37:50 PM
>but in the mountains you are at the whim of mother nature
i cant speak for anyone else but the appeal of mountains for me is (amoung other stuff) precisely that

Robb
29/05/2006
1:40:26 PM
On 29/05/2006 obsessedclimber wrote:
>Not to diss mountaineering/mountaineers or Sue or Lincoln, but why the
>hell would anyone take up mountaineering? Its like a sport for those who
>have a death wish! At least with free climbing you have a certain amount
>of control, but in the mountains you are at the whim of mother nature,
>and she can be a right bitch...

People choose to go to the mountains for various reasons. Mostly because they love it there, the experiences everything about it. Sure its dangerous, so is motor racing and smoking...... Some of my times in the moutains have been the most rewarding of my life. Non climbers sometimes ask why i do it "The view must be great!". Sometimes I try to explain, sometimes I dont bother...I don't need to justify it to anyone else.
Kind of like meditation. When you do it, you come closer to understanding the motives.

mousey
29/05/2006
1:45:05 PM
>I don't need to justify it to anyone else.
Kind of like meditation. When you do it, you come closer to understanding the motives.

AMEN!!
Onsight
29/05/2006
1:53:10 PM
This is terrible. My condolences to Sue's family and friends.


On 29/05/2006 obsessedclimber wrote:
>… why the
>hell would anyone take up mountaineering? Its like a sport for those who
>have a death wish!
I’m not into mountaineering, and yes sure it’s dangerous, but perhaps it is for those who want to live life more intensely? And I’m sure is can be both incredible just being there and personally very rewarding. I have more trouble understanding why people would want to spend their time pulling on plastic holds, getting excited about “competitions”, or playing on pissy little boulders, and little or nothing else. Each their own.

Super Saiyan
29/05/2006
2:02:21 PM
On 29/05/2006 Onsight wrote:
more trouble understanding why people would want to spend their time pulling
on plastic holds, getting excited about “competitions”, or playing on pissy
little boulders, and little or nothing else. Each their own.

yeah i guess, but the fatality rate in comps is much lower!

BigMike
29/05/2006
2:16:07 PM

>
>awarded an Order of Australia in 2005 for her achievements in mountaining

Cheers for that ... now fixed!

tnd
29/05/2006
2:39:44 PM
On 29/05/2006 BigMike wrote:
>
>>
>>awarded an Order of Australia in 2005 for her achievements in mountaining
>
>Cheers for that ... now fixed!

SMH letting the techos write the web site copy again?
gemmaw
29/05/2006
3:55:23 PM
On 29/05/2006 obsessedclimber wrote:
>Not to diss mountaineering/mountaineers or Sue or Lincoln, but why the
>hell would anyone take up mountaineering?

Each form of climbing has a different appeal. Alot of risks in the mountains can be avoided/reduced too - just depends on how far you want to push it. Besides you can die rock climbing.

Funnily, I just read about a study that found risk takers live longer, happier lives than those who are more sedate (provided they are not killed by their risk-taking of course).

anthonyk
29/05/2006
4:16:11 PM
how does "moderate" mountaineering compare to rock climbing in terms of accidents and fatalities? is it possible to keep the risks under control in easier mountaineering similar to how you can in rock climbing? or is it just inherently more dangerous even if you're not on dangerous peaks?

Romfrantic
29/05/2006
4:22:33 PM
Oh dear:

http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,20867,19292723-1702,00.html

I guess we can only hope and get the final definitive confirmation before anymore is said, especially given Lincoln Hall's amazing change of circumstances on Everest - this has been a terrible emotional roller-coaster!

mousey
29/05/2006
4:43:55 PM
wow!

what i find amazing is that with the newschool ability to relay information back to the rest of the world so quickly, that there isnt more restraint on the part of those in BC... you'd think there would be some resposibility on the part of the reporter to withold info from the media until they actually have the facts?

Romfrantic
30/05/2006
9:04:52 PM
Sadly, the search for Sue was not carried out:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/fears-family-give-up-hope/2006/05/30/1148956343283.html

RIP, Sue.

Post-edit: A link to World Expedition's website with a statement on Sue's situation on Manaslu ( http://www.worldexpeditions.com.au/index.php?section=adventure_news&id=115753 )
rod
31/05/2006
1:09:46 AM
On 29/05/2006 anthonyk wrote:
>how does "moderate" mountaineering compare to rock climbing in terms of
>accidents and fatalities? is it possible to keep the risks under control
>in easier mountaineering similar to how you can in rock climbing? or is
>it just inherently more dangerous even if you're not on dangerous peaks?

I think it a reasonable assumption to categorise the swiss mountaineering moderate given they're absent extreme oxygen depravation (obviously some peaks are exceptions: eg Eiger regularly throws out epics that make for great, oft tragic, reading).

I sourced the following data from the swiss alpine club http://www.sac-cas.ch click on FR in the top left then downloads sauvetage, rock climbing = escalade, course de haute montagne = "moderate" mountaineering, "morts" = deaths and is the easiest stat to get a handle on if you don't speak french. i have no data on participation rates but i suspect that sport climbing is at least equally practised because of the high frequency of visits to ecoles d'escalade (single pitch crags)...happy to be corrected.

Unexpected bad weather aside (even moderate peaks can be dangerous in these situations), with a reasonable level of experience, risk control in moderate mountaineering isn't much different than getting to, through and off a long TRAD protected multi-pitch. There are some additional risks in moderate mountains are crevasses, avalanches, seracs, slipping on ice and mild oxygen depravation (non-exhaustive). Approach walks and raps off many Euro multi-pitch trad climbing routes carry the same risks (eg the Cassin route at Piz Badile, site of an approach accident in 2004 that caused 2 deaths). As most long term rock climbers probably know from their own mistakes when rapping off routes, it often comes down to staying attentive, catering to the fatigue factor...and good luck.

None of the above is advice or a recommendation, you'll probably die doing any of the sports mentioned...my advice is don't do them and have a long very boring life.
gemmaw
31/05/2006
3:18:48 PM
Very tragic!

She certainly achieved some great climbs. Not to disrespect any of her achievements, but I have to disagree with the statements from the news reports saying she was "the first lady of mountaineering in Australia."

I think Freda Du Faur would have to have been the first lady in Australian mountaineering - what she did in the 1800s was amazing and way ahead of her time.
mrx78u
1/06/2006
12:22:09 PM
On 29/05/2006 obsessedclimber wrote:
>On 29/05/2006 Onsight wrote:
>more trouble understanding why people would want to spend their time pulling
>on plastic holds, getting excited about “competitions”, or playing on
>pissy
>little boulders, and little or nothing else. Each their own.
>
>yeah i guess, but the fatality rate in comps is much lower!

Spot on

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 24
There are 24 messages in this topic.

 

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