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Chockstone Forum - Crag & Route Beta

Crag & Route Beta

Area Location Sub Location Crag Links
VIC Northwest (General) (General) (General)  

Author
Hanging Rock

davetheyounger
15-Jan-2016
12:27:25 PM
Starting next week there is a new DELWP project officer looking at the management of Hanging Rock. Might be time for the climbing community to get its voice heard.
widewetandslippery
15-Jan-2016
12:41:29 PM
Which hanging rock!

davetheyounger
15-Jan-2016
1:25:04 PM
Victoria

kingerz
15-Jan-2016
3:33:23 PM
I don't think we should climb there myself. Firstly out of respect for the spiritual nature of the site and secondly as it is a tourist mecca and will end in an accident sooner or later. With Black Hill and Camel's Hump at hand, it's best left in my opinion.
gfdonc
15-Jan-2016
3:57:41 PM
Kingerz,
I'm guessing by your age you've never climbed there.

Hanging Rock is or could be a worthwhile asset to the climbing community because:

1. It's one of the early crucibles in the development of Victorian climbing with a number of FA's back in the 60's by early pioneers such Harley Burke and the ilk. In other words it has a strong historical relevance.

2. It's one of the most accessible, easy-grade crags close to Melbourne with a number of classic routes from grade 5 and up.

3. It also has a number of harder face routes that were put up by the leading climbers of the 80's, such as Carrigan, Law, Moorhead - in some cases the stuff of legend (the pioneering use of an inertia reel seat belt as a runner is what I'm thinking of).

I've long wished for the day it would reopen and revisit the climbs there. Bridge of Sighs was my first lead.

regards

billk
15-Jan-2016
5:06:28 PM
On 15/01/2016 kingerz wrote:
>I don't think we should climb there myself. Firstly out of respect for
>the spiritual nature of the site and secondly as it is a tourist mecca
>and will end in an accident sooner or later. With Black Hill and Camel's
>Hump at hand, it's best left in my opinion.

What's the spiritual nature of the site? Is it an important site for any of the Kulin people?
dalai
Online Now
15-Jan-2016
7:21:49 PM
I agree with gfdonc. It isn't like Melbourne is overrun with cliffs!

Having been fortunate to have climbed there a number of times before the ban, Hanging rock offers a great range of routes to try. Bridge of sighs and other easy classics, some great mid grade climbs to a number of tougher and quirky routes. (Belt Up is the grade 22 you are thinking of - belt wasn't retracting anymore when I onsighted that route).

Can't see how it could be the cause of accidents? Had a number of tourists watching whilst climbing on the more visible walls. If still worried, there are a number of routes on the multitude of walls well out of sight of the tourist path...

In regards to history, it was also where Australia's first bouldering grading system now long lost was created!
PeterW
16-Jan-2016
12:16:49 AM
Given that it's where I started climbing, lo those many years ago, I'd love to see climbing allowed there again!

One problem is that there have indeed been a number of accidents there over the years. (A colleague at my first job turned out to be the Paul Gillis who was carted off to hospital after decking out off an aid route.) Worse, groups became a problem in the past. There was an injury (fatality?) with a group student, and climbing was banned. After some time, the ban was relaxed, whereupon another group student promptly had an accident leading to the current climbing ban.

Interestingly, while trying to check out some details of the above accidents, I came across a management plan document which discusses allowing climbing for individuals, but with significant restrictions on groups.

http://www.visitmacedonranges.com/natural-attractions/hanging-rock/downloads-and-documents/management-plan/HRMP1314.pdf

The document appears to be from 2003, which makes me wonder whether it went anywhere. In particular, has anybody confirmed that the ban is still in place? The document specifically suggests NOT encouraging climbing - which could suggest the ban was relaxed without telling anybody!

IdratherbeclimbingM9
16-Jan-2016
3:38:56 PM
On 15/01/2016 kingerz wrote:
>I don't think we should climb there myself. Firstly out of respect for
>the spiritual nature of the site and secondly as it is a tourist mecca
>and will end in an accident sooner or later. With Black Hill and Camel's
>Hump at hand, it's best left in my opinion.

Anywhere that we used to have access and it was taken away for whatever reason, should validly (imo), be up for negotiation regarding re-establishing such access.

Regarding accidents. They statistically go with any climbing site, regardless of other issues.

JamesMc
16-Jan-2016
6:34:20 PM
Can kingerz enlighten us on the spiritual nature of the site?

The management plan says:

Hanging Rock is located on what was the north western boundary of
the Wurundjeri tribal area. It does not appear to have had any spiritual
significance other than it being a "special" place for the Wurundjeri,
stugang
16-Jan-2016
10:41:32 PM
A bunch of white posh chicks vanished there - wot could be more spiritual than that?
Other than the G - the spiritual site of warnies hat trick?
Or eddy and simeys antics in the nati dunnies?

Youse all need to get religion.

Miguel75
16-Jan-2016
11:04:12 PM
On 16/01/2016 Jayford4321 wrote:
SNIP...
>Youse all need to get religion.

Done! What next?
Karl Bromelow
17-Jan-2016
9:04:06 AM
From a 3 month old Environmental Management plan:

8.6.5 Future Recreational Opportunities
At times, MRSC is approached by private companies wanting to undertake managed activities in the Reserve such as rock climbing or a tree-top adventure course.
As outlined previously, rock climbing used to be allowed at the Reserve, and there are Peregrine Falcons that nest on the east face of the rock. In some other reserves, rock climbing is managed so that there is an annual period when there is no climbing due to Peregrine Falcons nesting. In popular rock climbing destinations such as Mount Arapiles, there are other impacts from rock climbers such as trampling and erosion, and markers being left across the rocks.
Other activities such as a tree-top adventure course, requires installation in large trees which could impact the use of these trees my by native fauna.
While these activities could expose more people to the natural values of the Reserve and provide additional income there are a number of impacts that would need to be investigated, including the effects on the reserveís vegetation, wildlife and car parking demand.
As the objective of the Conservation Zones is to manage these zones to conserve and enhance their ecological values, these activities should be restricted to the Recreation Zones
low impact conservation and passive recreation activities may be undertaken in the Conservation Zones such as night walks and orienteering. Any new recreation activities proposed for the Conservation Zones that may impact the ecological values of the reserve should be subject to a full ecological assessment and approved by Councilís eEnvironment Uunit.
Recommendations
 Focus future recreation activities in the Recreation Zones as a first preference. (Rec 101)
 Undertake an ecological impact assessment for future recreation activities, as appropriate, as a part of the investigation process and refer these proposals to Councilís environment unit for approval. (Rec 102)

If I am reading this correctly the implication is that rock climbing is high impact non-passive whereas bushwalking is low impact passive. I find this a curious distinction. Rock climbing suffers an image problem. To me it has always been more akin to introspective performance art than drag racing. The popular image is different and hinders progress with management bodies who may not see beyond that shallow media representation of our game.

Elsewhere in the same document reference is made to aboriginal heritage and the lack of any evidence for the place having any particular significance to the indigenous people of this land. Lack of evidence doesn't of course preclude any such significance.


IdratherbeclimbingM9
17-Jan-2016
12:48:56 PM
On 17/01/2016 Karl Bromelow wrote:
>From a 3 month old Environmental Management plan:
>(snip)
>Elsewhere in the same document reference is made to aboriginal heritage
>and the lack of any evidence for the place having any particular significance
>to the indigenous people of this land. Lack of evidence doesn't of course
>preclude any such significance.
>
I for one really do find it implausible that there is no significance of Hanging Rock to indigenous people. Even as a simple white fellah I find it evokes my emotions when viewed as I travel in it's vicinity and I am not referring to any specific rock-climbing element within those feelings either!
As such I also find it rather obscene that it can be locked up and payment required to access it (though this may have changed since I was last there?)...

I may be wrong, but didn't the recent protests about housing subdivision development proposed for the land on the western side of it also refer to aboriginal significance in their submission/s?

ajfclark
17-Jan-2016
1:53:56 PM
On 17/01/2016 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>As such I also find it rather obscene that it can be locked up and payment required to access it (though this may have changed since I was last there?)...

No, you have to pay to get out, not in.
Jayford4321
19-Jan-2016
2:50:16 PM
On 17/01/2016 ajfclark wrote:
>On 17/01/2016 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>>As such I also find it rather obscene that it can be locked up and payment
>required to access it (though this may have changed since I was last there?)...
>
>No, you have to pay to get out, not in.

nup.
it all depends on how U got in.
mattbrooks
23-Jan-2019
9:37:42 AM
This was 3 years ago, does anybody know if there was any engagement of the Commitee or Parks in regards opening up access at Hanging Rock??

There are 17 messages in this topic.

 

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