Goto Chockstone Home

  Guide
  Gallery
  Tech Tips
  Articles
  Reviews
  Dictionary
  Links
  Forum
  Search
  About

      Sponsored By
      ROCK
   HARDWARE

  Shop
FREIGHT FREE
in Australia

Edelrid: "Ultralight Helmet" (Red) Fits 54 - 60cm Great heavy duty all-rounder. SUPER SPECIAL for a short time only!  $79.00
21% Off

Chockstone Photography Australian Landscape Photography by Michael Boniwell
Australian Landscape Prints





Chockstone Forum - Crag & Route Beta

Crag & Route Beta

 Page 1 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 56
Area Location Sub Location Crag Links
VIC Buffalo Gorge (General) (General) [ Gorge Guide ] 

Author
Ozymandias and water
gemmaw
14/11/2003
5:12:25 PM
Does anyone have any info/knowledge about the availability of water for climbing Ozymandias, Mt Buffalo? Myself and my partners in climb have never been to Mt Buffalo before, and I've heard about streams down the bottom. Are the streams near the base of Ozy and if so, would there be water at this time of year? If not, is the usual procedure just to lug all your water down yourself?

We are planning to climb it over 3 days so we figured that is a fair amount of water to carry down (and haul up of course) for 3 people. And how much have others found they need: 3 litres each per day - too much, not enough?

Any other suggestions/recommendations about the climb and logistics would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Joe
15/11/2003
4:37:06 PM
When i did ozy direct a couple of years ago we lugged all our water. I think we budgeted about 3 litres per day. We did it when it was mega hot....like 40 degrees at lower elevations, and we ran out of water and got quite dehydrated. Aiding gets much harder when you have no water. One idea if you're doing ozy direct would be to rap in and leave some water a couple of pitches from the top to save yourself carrying it all. We were lucky to find some (very stale) water at the bottom of the last pitch which was a god send.

nmonteith
15/11/2003
8:34:43 PM
There is a permanent running big stream right at the base of Ozy. The water is clean and safe to drink. In full summer you will be stuck in the full sun for 8+ hours a day. Bring at least 4 litres per person per day.You can always empty the stuff out midway up the route if you arn't drinking as much as planned!

IdratherbeclimbingM9
17/11/2003
6:34:48 PM
On 15/11/2003 nmonteith wrote:
>There is a permanent running big stream right at the base of Ozy. The water
>is clean and safe to drink.

Crystal Brook is NOT a permanent stream. I have seen it when its little more than a trickle over the top of the falls and at the bottom non-existant. Whats left quickly disappears into the sand / soil / rocks.
In these conditions I located a minor trickle after 3 hrs of searching, (on the right bank looking downstream), where the stream surfaced again over a rock-bar about 100 m downstream of the base of the South side access track. It took about 10 minutes to fill three x 3 litre containers, ... (I said it was a minor trickle). This searching effort wasted 3 hrs of our time and included digging in wet sand under large boulders in the hope that some water may pool in the depressions, ... it didn't. The next day the trickle had stopped flowing.

We put steritabs in the water we collected ...

We became dehydrated later in the climb ...

At the present time there is plenty of water flowing there (I checked it out yesterday), but conditions can change drastically between now and the end of summer.

You can skimp on 2 litres per person per day, but 3 is definitely better.

Pre-placing water without a rope long enough to reach Big Grassy (170m from a suitable anchor), will only get you to the hanging belay on the headwall above 'The Fang' two pitches down from Wilkinson Lookout. With standard ropes you would not be able to gain the wall below this point due to the overhangs created by the Fang / Gledhill Bivvie roof; Main roof etc.

If you bail, don't throw your water. Instead leave it accessable for subsequent ascent parties who may need it ...
gfdonc
18/11/2003
1:13:06 PM
A5iswhereitsat wrote:
> Pre-placing water without a rope long enough to reach Big Grassy (170m from a suitable anchor), will only get you to the hanging belay on the headwall above 'The Fang' two pitches down from Wilkinson Lookout. With standard ropes you would not be able to gain the wall below this point due to the overhangs created by the Fang / Gledhill Bivvie roof; Main roof etc.

Umm .. don't recall how we did it exactly but I remember rapping in for some pics "after the event" and getting to the hanging bivvy site between the roofs (rooves?) with 2 ropes tied together, and not too much trouble. Maybe the first one down aided back in under one of the roofs, but I suspect not.


IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/11/2003
1:58:39 PM
On 18/11/2003 gfdonc wrote:
>Umm .. don't recall how we did it exactly but I remember rapping in for
>some pics "after the event" and getting to the hanging bivvy site between
>the roofs (rooves?) with 2 ropes tied together, and not too much trouble.

I have tied off to the boulder/s behind Wilkinson lookout with two 50m ropes tied together and 're-anchored' off the hanging belay above the Fang, whilst toproping a fellow (off that belay) who was working the moves below it.
This had me suspended below the fang at 25m from the headwall belay, and still about 10m above a 'slab' forming the upper side of the Gledhill roof.
You can get to the slab on 2 ropes but anything below that would be suspended out from the wall.
The lip forming the start of the slab/end of Gledhill Bivvie roof is not that wide (thick) but would certainly let one obtain good photos of the Gledhill Bivvie area from that point.

If I was leaving water and only using standard ropes, then my guess is the slab is the lowest option without significant jiggery-pokery or a much longer rope.
A 200m static anchored from the same spot gets you to Big Grassy with about 35m to spare.
Dalai
18/11/2003
3:29:46 PM
On 18/11/2003 A5iswhereitsat wrote:

>whilst toproping a fellow (off that belay) who was working the moves below
>it.

and

>A 200m static anchored from the same spot gets you to Big Grassy with
>about 35m to spare.

Toprope, 200 m static!!?? taking away the adventure a little isn't it?

IdratherbeclimbingM9
18/11/2003
4:57:08 PM
On 18/11/2003 Dalai wrote:
>Toprope, 200 m static!!?? taking away the adventure a little isn't it?

We travelled down from central west NSW for my 1st attempt on it, which was aborted due to my climbing partner breaking a bone in his foot. We used that trip to reconnoiter the Sth side access.

My 2nd attempt was a successful 'onsight' of Ozy Direct (in cruise mode), where we spent 5 nights on the wall for the deliberate extended experience / adventure. We also did a couple of pitches at night for the adventure of it, and got further adventure by completing the final pitches in wet conditions.

Subsequent to that I have been washed off the wall in the biggest rainfall event Buffalo has had in the last 20 years. The irony of that trip was that the other members of the team decided not to haul (excess) water and so we spent one of the two fine days of weather we had at the start of that week, preplacing water down to Big Grassy. (Yes I used a 200m static). I still got some adventure by simul-jumaring out, and later that trip by negotiating the swollen creek and finding the Sewer Wall variation Sth side access then exiting out in sodden conditions.

Along the way I have also acted as a belay slave for a member of a successful 1 day ascent party, who wanted to work some moves free. He also had previously done the route in traditional manner over a 3 day period, but was upping his ante by aiming for a one day ascent. I was not a member of that party, and (still) at this point in time do not harbour any one day ascent ambitions.
True ... there is not much adventure in being a belay slave for someone else to toprope, unless you consider totally free-hanging below The Fang as a belay stance to be adventurous.

My concept of adventure? ... I am in love with the place and intend to play there a lot more yet. I intend to get my next adventure at that location by rope-soloing Gumtree this coming Christmas holidays.

Its a fantastic climb and climbing area; and personally I feel good about my ethics and 'adventures' there. I also feel a strong affinity towards anyone who has done it or attempted it, because I have a strong empathy for the place and what it takes to be successful there. I tip my hat to the legends who pioneered the place, and also the present day legends who set almost unbelievable (to me) standards in performance in that arena.

Sorry if I come across as being in any way aggro, but 'sport climber / boulderer' I recognise I am not, and minor though it may be to some, doing Ozy Direct I consider is one of the highlights of my climbing experience to date; ... hence the A5iswhereitsat moniker, because hopefully before I finish, I will achieve some truly hard aid leads at that inspiring location.
Hope to see you on the rock at Buffalo sometime :)
Dalai
18/11/2003
5:38:40 PM
Hi A5,

I am sorry that my post was perceived in a negative way as to require such a lengthy reply. I just personally felt that such tactics disregard the great history and standing this climb should hold, hence my comment.

Over the years, I have never gone out specifically to aid anything as it has never really interested me. But Ozy has always held a place in my mind as THE one aid route I would like to do (partners have always cancelled/changed plans prior to attempting this climb). My mind has always seen myself on this climb though, adrift in the sea of granite which is the North Wall. Not in haste, but enjoying life over multiple days on a wall and facing the extra challenges that life on the wall provides. With the security net a fixed static line or a toprope would provide, defeats for me the reasons why I would be on Ozy in the first place.

Cheers Martin

nmonteith
18/11/2003
6:03:07 PM
Pre-placing water and rap inspection does seem to take away a lot of the adventure!
MikeR
18/11/2003
9:01:52 PM
I visited this area last year, months after the fires. Although the region was "open to the public" many routes were closed and overnight camping banned completely. I was stopped by a ranger threatening fines and had to turn my visit into a day walk. The reason stated was that fire retardant used heavily in this area was toxic and all water was undrinkable. Contact Park Victoria to find out about accessability and water drinkability.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
19/11/2003
11:12:19 AM
On 18/11/2003 Dalai wrote:
>Not in haste, but enjoying life over multiple days on a wall and facing
>the extra challenges that life on the wall provides. With the security
>net a fixed static line or a toprope would provide, defeats for me the reasons why I >would be on Ozy in the first place.

Spot-on Dalai.

The lengthy reply was to indicate that we did not fix ropes, pre-place water or abseil pre-inspect the route prior to our achieving 1st success on it.

I have preplaced water for various reasons since that time (the 200m was retrieved prior to the attempted ascent), as a result of consultation with new climbing partners and their timeframes/wishes.

I fully agree with your comments re history and standing of the climb. This coupled with an uncertain outcome is a true recipe for adventure!

I certainly relate to your "not in haste" comment for 2 reasons;
1st to savour every moment combined with the joy of making every placement a work of art; and 2ndly because it quite naturally fits my 'sloth-like' speed of aiding!

Hey Dalai, perhaps we could do the route together sometime if you are into lengthy sojourns in that type of environment.
Climbing with someone capable of much higher grades than myself would be inspirational for me, (I would have loved to have seen Steve Monks doing it). If you feel like doing any pitches in sport fashion we can pull the rope but leave the preplaced pro after aiding it!!

IdratherbeclimbingM9
19/11/2003
4:48:35 PM
On 14/11/2003 gemmaw wrote:
>We are planning to climb it over 3 days so we figured that is a fair amount
>of water to carry down (and haul up of course) for 3 people. And how much
>have others found they need: 3 litres each per day - too much, not enough?
>
>Any other suggestions/recommendations about the climb and logistics would
>be greatly appreciated.

Sorry to hijack the thread; ...so to get back on track; ... re logistics-> If you intend hauling 27 litres of water + personal gear, I recommend becoming familiar with the 'Yosemite haul' or Z pulley systems in a controlled environment with loads equal to that which you will actually have.
A wall hauling pulley is very useful or barring that, a 'prusik-minding' pulley. Karabiners as pullies are grievous ... :{

I find the 3 litre clear plastic juice containers with the inbuilt fliptop style carry handle on top (recycle #0) virtually indestructable. Don't use the opaque type containers (recycle #1 or higher) they disintegrate under abusive conditions, and often their screwcaps do not have much thread, so if squashed, ... their lids pop off!

Decide your tactics beforehand.
A team of three should be faster than a team of two, particularly if you have someone leading all the time, with the 2nd ascending the haul line (fixed by the leader at the top belay when they arrive), then belaying and hauling (or leading through), and the 3rd person cleans / assists the haul, particularly if the bag/s get/s stuck.
To facilitate this tactic you will need an additional lead rope, half an additional rack and a light zip-line for the leader to get the cleaned gear to them once they are out from the top belay.

Aid climbing is like watching paint dry (to some people), because it can be so slow to make progress.
If you have not got your system dialled in, then I suggest practising 1st, as you may be surprised by the clusterjams you will inevitably find if you have not done it before, (& even if you have, ... you are still not immune to these creatures!).
For Ozy you will need to be comfortable aiding on gear as thin as #3 RPs. Extras of this size is most advantageous on the pitches leading to Big Grassy.
If you do Ozy Direct you will need a couple of large camming devices or tubechock/s to protect the meat of the final pitch. Metolius #10 or camalot #4.5 is minimum size required, although a #4 Friend with a block of wood will work. There is an excellent article in Rock Magazine (quite a while ago now) on Ozy, its history, gear requirements etc.

Wear comfortable footwear and topstep in your etriers as often as possible, because fewer placements saves time.

Be prepared to wreck your gear and yourselves as wall climbing is hard on gear and can bring out flaws in ones character, not to mention being physically demanding.

Most of all ... have fun.
Despite my ramblings above it is truely an amazing experience and an incredible place to partake of it in.
(It will either cure you of the habit or give you an insatiable lust for more of the same!)

nmonteith
19/11/2003
5:34:05 PM
A couple of additional tips...

If you bore easily bring a small radio or a book with a tie off loop attached for the belayer.
Defiantly belay with a gri-gri - as i have had many belayers fall asleep whilst i am on lead!
Bring a cheap tarp to protect against the sun when on big grassy ledge. If you don't have a portaledge - 3 people is very squashed on big grassy/muddy.
If you can get them - buy cam hooks. They are one of the secrets to fast aiding.
If you are a slow aider then wear skateboard knee pads and gloves to stop destruction of soft squishy bits. If you are fast and light - leave them behind.
On the last pitch of the day - wear you headlamp! It is better to have it then to get be-nighted.
I have never had to set-up a Z pully for hauling - but i can certianly recommend a waul hauler or just a few basic petzel pullys for hauling.
A rope bucket/bag is a good way of making things less messy - especially when it is very windy (on Zodiac on El Cap the strong wind managed to twist our three lead ropes into one big tangle. It took us hours to untangle before we could keep climbing!)
Forget about trying to cook. Leave the stove behind and just eat pitabreads and tins of beans/meat/pasta. It is not importnat to have dehydarted food - as you have to carry water up anyway.



Dalai
20/11/2003
10:40:12 AM
On 19/11/2003 A5iswhereitsat wrote:

>Hey Dalai, perhaps we could do the route together sometime if you are
>into lengthy sojourns in that type of environment.

Maybe I can wrangle some time in Autumn to get up there. I would enjoy finally getting onto Ozy, and with someone who has been and knows there way around would be great. I will keep you posted of my plans.

Cheers Martin

IdratherbeclimbingM9
20/11/2003
11:13:44 AM
On 20/11/2003 Dalai wrote:
>I would enjoy finally getting onto Ozy, and with someone who has been and knows >there way around would be great.

(With tongue firmly in cheek); ... that wouldn't take away the adventure of it would it??

Nah!, IMHO its one of those climbs that is worthy of doing again and again ...
The adventure can be scaled up or down (to an extent) to suit the occasion.
Dalai
20/11/2003
11:35:57 AM
Talking about adventure - after the last couple of times partners cancelled, I have been contemplating solo aiding it over three or so days. Never having aided or solo aided could make it a mega adventure/epic...

I have blown the adventure onsight already anyway. Walked into the base with Abby Watkins and Steve Schneider when they did the at the time fastest one day ascent in 97.
gfdonc
20/11/2003
5:05:43 PM
OK, given Gemma also started with "and any other info" I'll add my bit .. but be warned its about 18 years since I last did Ozy (gulp).
1. Practise on some one-pitch aid routes - the You Yangs has some crack routes on granite with a passing resemblance to the Buffalo rough-stuff. "Adam" was our starting point.
2. A fifi hook is important to maximise reach. Whadda they call those these days?
3. Take the fattest rope you own. Rough granite edges and 1000' of exposure changes your perceptions on security.
4. Know who you're going with. Can they hack 3 days solid of high adrenaline, with only 2 ways to escape?
5. A pulley is essential for hauling any decent load. Essential!
6. A walkie talkie might be good for talking to mates watching from the other side of the gorge. $98 a pair at Dick Smiths at the moment I think. Come to think of it these would be brilliant for talking to the other end of the rope, which can be nearly impossible on the upper roof pitches in a wind.
7. Don't bother trying to cook. Take stuff to munch while on belay. Take a pee bottle.
8. Despite all the concerns about water, Buffalo is at 5000 feet elevation and can be very cold when the sun goes off the wall (and you're hanging on belay for a slow lead). Have layers, and a small day pack so the leader can carry a jacket.
9. If all else fails, just remember that the walk out the South Side is one of the most horrible experiences of my life, so keep climbing.
10. Do you take a hammer? I have done 3 routes, and taken a hammer on two of them, but only "in case". Used it once to bash a 5RP into a flared piton scar on the last ascent. (Oh, for a mashie at the time).
11. Don't drop anything. Tie cords or gaffer tape loops onto stuff so you can clip them in.
12. Make sure your belay seats are comfy. Oh, and knee pads are a good idea.
13. Be really fit and well rested at the start.
gemmaw
20/11/2003
5:21:35 PM
Hey, thanks for all the valuable information!

We are heading off tonight for our grand adventure, and have 4 days up our sleeves. Hopefully the rain/thunderstorms will be easing off. At least there will be water available at the bottom, and sounds as though there is already from what I've read here.

We've got the big cams, small nuts, tarp, knee pads, gloves, small radio, pulleys, gri-gri, etc, etc as we've read as much as we could about the climb and from what I've read from this thread. We checked out the possibility of getting cam hooks but they don't seem to be available in Australia. We even have a collapsible belay seat as we've also heard about the long waits for the leader, and we certainly won't be fast - we'll see if the seat turns out to be a blessing or a burden. We've gone over our tactics and our hauling - we think we are pretty well prepared but also expect that there will be chaos sometimes.

Our aim is to have a great adventure and great fun!

So thanks again.
gfdonc
20/11/2003
5:37:15 PM
Ummm .. it may be late in the day but I really think you want to take a butt-seat *each*. Have you tried hanging in a harness for 30 minutes?
If you're in Melbourne and want to borrow one (or two) I still have them at home, you could ring me now on 9320 9035.

 Page 1 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 56
There are 56 messages in this topic.

 

Home | Guide | Gallery | Tech Tips | Articles | Reviews | Dictionary | Forum | Links | About | Search
Chockstone Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography

Please read the full disclaimer before using any information contained on these pages.



Australian Panoramic | Australian Coast | Australian Mountains | Australian Countryside | Australian Waterfalls | Australian Lakes | Australian Cities | Australian Macro | Australian Wildlife
Landscape Photo | Landscape Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Fine Art Photography | Wilderness Photography | Nature Photo | Australian Landscape Photo | Stock Photography Australia | Landscape Photos | Panoramic Photos | Panoramic Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography | Mothers Day Gifts | Gifts for Mothers Day | Mothers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Mothers Day | Wedding Gift Ideas | Christmas Gift Ideas | Fathers Day Gifts | Gifts for Fathers Day | Fathers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Fathers Day | Landscape Prints | Landscape Poster | Limited Edition Prints | Panoramic Photo | Buy Posters | Poster Prints