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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

Author
OT - taking tots into the bush

jkane
22/12/2010
3:10:02 PM
I have a 9 month old boy who just started crawling. He can sit up unaided but I haven't seen him get himself into a sitting position yet. He's may be too big for the Baby Bjorn thingy now (might try this first though) but not sure if he's ready for a backpack type carrier.

Anyone have any experience taking a tot out walking at this stage? Should I just wait a couple more months?

Also recommendations for a backpack style carrier?

Obviously I won't be trying to do anything partcularly long or hardcore - especially to start with. Any other good advice?


swampy
22/12/2010
3:47:27 PM
Have an 8 month and have just got back into it. Been bouldering a bit as it's easy to tend to bub's needs.
Yes have used an Ergo baby carrier, a pram and a Deuter back pack style carrier. Pram obviously had easy access. You just need to check the bottom is relatively flat. Went prepared with food, drink, hammock, shade etc and is definitely easier with 3 or more adults as can take turns to watch bubs while the climbing takes place.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
22/12/2010
4:04:12 PM
On 22/12/2010 jkane wrote:
>I have a 9 month old boy who just started crawling.
&.
>Anyone have any experience taking a tot out walking at this stage? Should
>I just wait a couple more months?
>
Yeah, I'd wait until he is walking, so he has at least a chance of keeping up...
;-)


>Also recommendations for a backpack style carrier?
>
Whatever you get, baby will outgrow it rapidly. This may not matter if baby ends up having younger siblings?

My eldest was running by the time she was 9 months. Tried various baby carrier back-pack thingies (borrowed friends ones before purchasing our own), but had the most trouble (other than when she was asleep), with her constantly standing up and potentially overbalancing in it! ~> so I recommend getting one that does not have a sub-frame in a location they can stand on.

Regardless of the hassle, enjoy them while they are little, as they don't remain that way long.

jkane
22/12/2010
4:41:44 PM
>Yeah, I'd wait until he is walking, so he has at least a chance of keeping
>up...
>;-)
ha ha, yeah or I could just get him some knee pads and gloves and dangle something breakable or dangerous from the back of my day pack.
TonyB
23/12/2010
11:30:52 AM
We have a Baby Bjorn front carrier plus a Kathmandu back pack baby carrier for our almost 12Kg 11mth old baby boy. We've been taking him to the bush since he was a couple of months old. The front carrier is far better when scrambling and easier to protect the baby from bushes, rocks etc. He's now too big for us to do up the top buckles. The back carrier is easier on flatter ground.

We have a little pop up tent for him that was good when he was small but now he wants to crawl around too much. A big picnic blanket with a heavy duty underside is best for him now at the crag.

I've noticed that "Use of products that contain eucalyptus oil are generally not recommended for children under six years of age" "Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, coma. Skin redness, irritation, and burning from handling leaves and bark. Eucalyptus oil is extremely toxic if eaten.", but I'd assume that chowing down on dry leaves, twigs and dirt (as they do) is OK.
grangrump
23/12/2010
11:41:07 AM
On 23/12/2010 TonyB wrote:
>I've noticed that "Use of products that contain eucalyptus oil are generally
>not recommended for children under six years of age" "Nausea, vomiting,
>diarrhea, coma. Skin redness, irritation, and burning from handling leaves
>and bark. Eucalyptus oil is extremely toxic if eaten.", but I'd assume
>that chowing down on dry leaves, twigs and dirt (as they do) is OK.
Extracted oils are toxic (roughly similar to most solvents, hexane etc). As usual it's all in the dose. And no-one is going to eat enough gum leaves (just ask a koala)
TonyB
24/12/2010
8:18:55 PM
I also came across this:
' In Australia sawfly larvae, which contain poisonous polypeptides, often gather in mounds beneath E. melanophloia. When cattle consume the larvae, they become uncoordinated, tremble, and can suffer permanent liver damage. '
http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/medicinal/eucalyp.html
No mention of toxic dose for either cows or babies.

I do wonder if there's much in dirt that's toxic. Babies do seem to enjoy the odd handfull. Nothing like muching on a fistfull of sand at the beach either.

Richard
28/12/2010
1:51:49 AM
Hey Jim, congrats.

I can't remember what age we started using these, but I'd say if they fit in, its not to early - the crawling / early walking stage later is a bit more problematic until they learn to obey you. Can't make any recomendations on brand - think we bought one on ebay. You can use them for quite a few years - not necessarliy someting they grow out of quickly. The advantage of baby carriers is that they usualy have soem space for the other things you need to carry.

Cheers, Richard
climberman
28/12/2010
4:33:47 PM
On 28/12/2010 Richard wrote:
>Hey Jim, congrats.
>
>I can't remember what age we started using these, but I'd say if they
>fit in, its not to early - the crawling / early walking stage later is
>a bit more problematic until they learn to obey you. >

Is this around when they turn 25 ?

masterofrup
29/12/2010
12:45:40 AM
We have a deuter one which I think came from snowgum with an optional sun shade. It is quite reasonable to use for both me and bub. Not convinced about the price. I use it quite regularly in preference to a pusher. In crowds or on public transport etc it gives me the shits a lot less. This has become even more attractive with numbers two and three around as my hands are free to deal with more mobile mad ones. The key here is that our boy loves it. I suspect this is not universal. Oh yeah it is good for bushwalking too I particularly like its ability to be freestanding. This means I can put it on by myself and it doubles as a bush high chair. I would think any child who can sit up would be fine in one. Have fun.

There are 10 messages in this topic.

 

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