Goto Chockstone Home

  Guide
  Gallery
  Tech Tips
  Articles
  Reviews
  Dictionary
  Links
  Forum
  Search
  About

      Sponsored By
      ROCK
   HARDWARE

  Shop
Chockstone Photography
Australian Landscape Photography by Michael Boniwell
Australian Landscape Prints





Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 23
Author
Why do you climb?

Climboholic
23-May-2015
12:05:39 PM
This whole fiasco with Centennial Trev is the culmination of my disillusion with climbing. Not climbing itself, which remains a pure and inherently pointless act, but the climbing community.

The majority of climbers see climbing as nothing more than an enjoyable pastime, but the climbing community is dominated by a minority of people who identify themselves as 'important members'. These self important people are motivated to varying degrees by ego. They are competitive, they think climbing is superior to all other hobbies, they have bolting wars, they spend a lot of time on chockstone, they think climbing is important.

There is another small group who don't set out to make a name for themselves, but look up at a cliff and find inspiration. They have an almost Buddhist perspective that everything is meaningless, so you might as well do something that makes you happy. Through vision, talent and boldness they have discovered most of the classic climbs. When they climb a new route they might not write it up. If they do, it is to share their experience with others. We all know their names.

Most climbers are a combination of the above three groups. Which type of climber are you?

This personal perspective is the culmination my observations over more than 10 years of climbing. Seminal moments include watching a movie about a teenager groping the same boulder for months as if getting to the top is a significant achievement, or listening to people talk incessantly at me about grades, gear, sends and the 'important' climbers they know.

One of the biggest examples of self delusion I've seen amongst climbers is when they claim to put up new routes to 'give back' to climbing. If you want to contribute then go to a track maintenance day, or pick up some rubbish, or bury your sh!t. But be honest with yourself, doing a climb then jumping on TheCrag to upload it is an egotistical act. If you truly want to be altruistic then you could volunteer to contribute to one of the many legitimate issues in the world: the refugee crisis, religious fundamentalism, climate change, etc. But accept the fact that climbing is inherently selfish and the world does not have a critical shortage of uninspiring, hard sports climbs.

When I'm old and retired and have nothing better to do, I might go on a grey nomad bolt chopping tour of Australia. I might even manufacture some higher ethical purpose to the endeavor. But for now I have more important things to contribute to the world.

White Trash
23-May-2015
8:15:53 PM
On 23/05/2015 Climboholic wrote:
>This whole fiasco with Centennial Trev is the culmination of my disillusion
>with climbing. Not climbing itself, which remains a pure and inherently
>pointless act, but the climbing community.
>
>The majority of climbers see climbing as nothing more than an enjoyable
>pastime, but the climbing community is dominated by a minority of people
>who identify themselves as 'important members'. These self important people
>are motivated to varying degrees by ego. They are competitive, they think
>climbing is superior to all other hobbies, they have bolting wars, they
>spend a lot of time on chockstone, they think climbing is important.
>
>There is another small group who don't set out to make a name for themselves,
>but look up at a cliff and find inspiration. They have an almost Buddhist
>perspective that everything is meaningless, so you might as well do something
>that makes you happy. Through vision, talent and boldness they have discovered
>most of the classic climbs. When they climb a new route they might not
>write it up. If they do, it is to share their experience with others. We
>all know their names.
>
>Most climbers are a combination of the above three groups. Which type
>of climber are you?
>
>This personal perspective is the culmination my observations over more
>than 10 years of climbing. Seminal moments include watching a movie about
>a teenager groping the same boulder for months as if getting to the top
>is a significant achievement, or listening to people talk incessantly at
>me about grades, gear, sends and the 'important' climbers they know.
>
>One of the biggest examples of self delusion I've seen amongst climbers
>is when they claim to put up new routes to 'give back' to climbing. If
>you want to contribute then go to a track maintenance day, or pick up some
>rubbish, or bury your sh!t. But be honest with yourself, doing a climb
>then jumping on TheCrag to upload it is an egotistical act. If you truly
>want to be altruistic then you could volunteer to contribute to one of
>the many legitimate issues in the world: the refugee crisis, religious
>fundamentalism, climate change, etc. But accept the fact that climbing
>is inherently selfish and the world does not have a critical shortage of
>uninspiring, hard sports climbs.
>
>When I'm old and retired and have nothing better to do, I might go on
>a grey nomad bolt chopping tour of Australia. I might even manufacture
>some higher ethical purpose to the endeavor. But for now I have more important
>things to contribute to the world.

i do it becos i like overcoming the scare myself factor.

you dont have to be a grey nomad to chop bolts either.

how do yo umeasure ego, especialy in ignorant an unrespectful climbers like those that attack others on websites (central trev), and the crowd that shits inappropriately in the bush at cliffs?
Jayford4321
23-May-2015
8:44:13 PM
I climb to overcome disillusionment.

On 23/05/2015 Climboholic wrote:
>This whole fiasco with Centennial Trev is the culmination of my disillusion
>with climbing. Not climbing itself, which remains a pure and inherently
>pointless act, but the climbing community.
>
So, what are U going to do about ur disillusion now?

>accept the fact that climbing is inherently selfish and the world does not have a critical shortage of uninspiring, hard sports climbs.
>

+1 to that.

>When I'm old and retired and have nothing better to do, I might go on
>a grey nomad bolt chopping tour of Australia.

Apply to dangerouser cliffs incorporated for a km allowance/subsidy. I reckon ODH would be up for the maths involved.

JamesMc
23-May-2015
9:48:58 PM
I climb because I like climbing.
JamesMc

Snacks
24-May-2015
10:54:56 AM
On 23/05/2015 Climboholic wrote:
>One of the biggest examples of self delusion I've seen amongst climbers
>is when they claim to put up new routes to 'give back' to climbing. If
>you want to contribute then go to a track maintenance day, or pick up some
>rubbish, or bury your sh!t. But be honest with yourself, doing a climb
>then jumping on TheCrag to upload it is an egotistical act. If you truly
>want to be altruistic then you could volunteer to contribute to one of
>the many legitimate issues in the world: the refugee crisis, religious
>fundamentalism, climate change, etc. But accept the fact that climbing
>is inherently selfish and the world does not have a critical shortage of
>uninspiring, hard sports climbs.

+1 to that

Don't particularly want to be a 'bolter' myself, but I don't mind helping them out from time to time. Can be a fun day out in itself...

Though you may have met some different bolters to disillusion you but all of the bolters I personally have met do plenty or have done plenty of rebolting of old routes out of their own pocket and maintain anchors etc on a regular basis... VanessaW, JasonL, MattB, NeilM, MikeL, PaulT, BenL, RickP, SimonV and I'm sure there's others I've met that I can't think of right now...

Perhaps all that money could be 'better' spent elsewhere but I'm in a glasshouse on that one. I'm not going to be complaining when I next clip into some shiny new steel that now sits aside some 10mm embedded mank somewhere.

Maybe it's easier to just climb for yourself and your own reasons?

Climboholic
26-May-2015
8:38:33 AM
On 24/05/2015 Snacks wrote:

>... Perhaps all that money could be 'better' spent elsewhere but I'm in a
>glasshouse on that one. I'm not going to be complaining when I next clip
>into some shiny new steel that now sits aside some 10mm embedded mank somewhere.
>
>Maybe it's easier to just climb for yourself and your own reasons?

Agreed
Howsie
26-May-2015
9:13:31 AM
I climb because I love the challenge, the intricate moves, the puzzle and the delight of pulling it all together.

I climb because Iím addicted to good food, chocolate and beer and it allows me to indulge without gaining a pound.

I climb because Iím a nerd for gadgets and gear and there is nothing I like buying more than a new shinny piece of climbing gear.

I climb because it gets me outdoors and makes it easy to meet a truck load of likeminded people that share the same passion.

I climb because of all the exciting places to visit and it has reinvigorated my travelling.

I climb because it keeps me fit and it was over 20 years ago when I looked this good naked.

I climb because it scares me, it makes me laugh, it makes me think, it makes me live.

I climb because there is no good reason not to climb.

H
Reluctant
26-May-2015
2:28:21 PM
I climb therefore I am

Miguel75
26-May-2015
5:17:39 PM
On 26/05/2015 Howsie wrote:
...SNIP...
>I climb because it keeps me fit and it was over 20 years ago when I looked
>this good naked.

Hmm, I sense some bias in your statement Howsie;) To help qualify your statement I suggest posting a few tasteful nudie pics, one from 20 years ago and one from now. You supply the pics, Chocky will supply the objectivity;)
kieranl
26-May-2015
7:19:10 PM
Somewhat along the lines of this from the Freakers Ball trip to Patagonia in early 70s :

Why do people climb mountains in Patagonia? It's too windy for chess.

(thinking of that made me google to see if there are any links to that trip, which I originally read about in the NZAJ years ago, and I found this http://articles.latimes.com/2004/feb/17/news/os-fitzroy17 from one of the survivors)
mikllaw
26-May-2015
8:25:29 PM
On 23/05/2015 JamesMc wrote:
>I climb because I like climbing.

I climb because it's a necessary part of going climbing, which is a necessary part of me (I still don't know if I like it)
rowan
26-May-2015
9:24:27 PM
On 23/05/2015 Climboholic wrote:

>
>When I'm old and retired and have nothing better to do, I might go on
>a grey nomad bolt chopping tour of Australia. I might even manufacture
>some higher ethical purpose to the endeavor. But for now I have more important
>things to contribute to the world.

I think climbing is pointless. Life is pointless. What world? Society? What are the more important things you have to contribute to the world.? More mouths to feed? Your job? Your mortgage repayments?

Pat
27-May-2015
5:39:28 AM
I second Mikl's necessity.

When I was a spotty teenager I climbed for all sorts of twisted ego reasons and had high and mighty two bit philosophical reasons. Mostly to convince my mum I was a something. Ouch.

In my twenties it was to get onto Everest and also because I was in the angry-young-man-phase showing the world I wouldn't conform. Yawn.

Conformed in my thirties - climbed to convince myself I wasn't conforming. Took my young kids climbing. Ohh so edgy. Yawn.

In my late forties now. Not so sure of the reasons. Do really love getting out on rock - to rehash Eric Liddell - when I climb I feel God's pleasure. Which is another way of saying when I climb I feel a lot like me. Does that have meaning? Well, as much as being the best version of yourself has meaning - yes.

Still not sure I like it either Mikl. Why do I still get so scared? As I get older, I'm a better climber, safer climber, but notice that the fear seems to be increasing, but so is my capacity to manage it. Go figure.

lingy
27-May-2015
8:01:04 AM
It gets me out of the house
martym
27-May-2015
10:33:50 AM
I can't remember the climb we were on, but it was a killer day on multipitch and my friend said "it's all good training".
I asked "training for what?"
"What ever comes next."

Chloe
27-May-2015
11:27:17 AM
>Why do you climb?

As an excuse to get on Chocky.
KP
27-May-2015
12:26:04 PM
What a Debbie downer of a post!

Chloe
27-May-2015
1:25:31 PM
On 27/05/2015 KP wrote:
>What a Debbie downer of a post!

You have trouble keeping the weight off too?

Superstu
27-May-2015
5:12:28 PM
I climb because I get grumpy if I don't.


camjammer
27-May-2015
7:31:49 PM
Most people that climb incessantly get asked why by non-climbers (Climbers don't necessarily ask but smile when they have found someone with a similar obsession) . You have to accept the fact that climbing is essentially pointless and to claim otherwise is to delude yourself. Over the years I've realised that if I don't climb I get grumpy and so I need to climb to stay happy. The reasons I've come up with is that climbing is a physical and mental challenge and with a degree of fear thrown in for good measure. When I climb I solely concentrate on climbing out of fear of dying or injury (possibly over exaggerated fear but self induced). I forget about all the other stresses of life for the day and concentrate only on the next hold, the next piece of gear, the next belay. I also go climbing with people I like and get along with.

At the end of the day I'm physically and mentally exhausted, happy to have completed a climb or to have at least gotten away with out injury for another day, have spent the day in good company, and not having thought about about work, money or other generally life concerns all day. This makes me feel better and sleep better at night.

So climbing is basically a distraction from life but it's the best thing I've found so far.

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 23
There are 23 messages in this topic.

 

Home | Guide | Gallery | Tech Tips | Articles | Reviews | Dictionary | Forum | Links | About | Search
Chockstone Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography | Landscape Photos Australia

Please read the full disclaimer before using any information contained on these pages.



Australian Panoramic | Australian Coast | Australian Mountains | Australian Countryside | Australian Waterfalls | Australian Lakes | Australian Cities | Australian Macro | Australian Wildlife
Landscape Photo | Landscape Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Fine Art Photography | Wilderness Photography | Nature Photo | Australian Landscape Photo | Stock Photography Australia | Landscape Photos | Panoramic Photos | Panoramic Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography | High Country Mountain Huts | Mothers Day Gifts | Gifts for Mothers Day | Mothers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Mothers Day | Wedding Gift Ideas | Christmas Gift Ideas | Fathers Day Gifts | Gifts for Fathers Day | Fathers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Fathers Day | Landscape Prints | Landscape Poster | Limited Edition Prints | Panoramic Photo | Buy Posters | Poster Prints