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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

Author
Car rego in VIC. Need a rwc... opinions?
emloughl
11/01/2014
1:38:54 PM
Hey folks,

I'm trying to get a rwc for a high mileage old car with some wear/tear (aesthetically) but in excellent running condition.

The story:
I bought a car off gumtree in Brisbane for $200 so I could backpack & climb Australia. I took it in for a rwc, and literally everything passed fine except for some fraying on the driver side seat belt. I went to an auto wrecker that had a replacement belt, but its condition was no better. Since that was 24th Dec, everywhere else was closed and I was SOL. However, the previous owner was an amazing guy and let me drive on his rego until its expiry. I drove it from Brisbane down through Vic, and parked it in Melb. Met another backpacking climber and gave her the car. Now I'm back in Canada but she's left with the task of trying to get it roadworthy.

I wanted to get the rwc done for her before I left but when I talked to a mechanic he said Victoria is incredibly strict, much more so than Queensland. He told me that the car would fail from fabric tears in the seat, for instance, and that the entire seats would need replacement. Or any interior loose plastic.

Can anybody help me out with your thoughts/opinions on this? Does anybody know a reasonable mechanic that would be willing to do a lenient inspection?

Your help is greatly appreciated... I already got my benefit out of the car, it's just that it made my trip I'd like to see it take more climbers to see Australia, and it seems so wasteful to send it to the junk yard when it runs so well. (As that's likely its fate if we can't get it back on the road).

It's a '91 Daihatsu Charade, with nearly 340,000 kms

Thanks in advance!
Evan
Wendy
11/01/2014
1:54:13 PM
Macca at Horsham Car Spares and Repairs. If he can't get it roadworthied at an affordable price, you don't have a lot of hope. Or try SA. Having said that, it will be more than you paid for the car anyway - it's $150 just for the certificate even if nothing needs doing.
patto
Online Now
11/01/2014
1:56:56 PM
RWC from any place in Victoria that wants to keep its license is generally pretty strict.

A car like what you describe can often be worthless in Victoria. The fact that the rego has expired means that she also needs a VicRoads inspection when she re-registers it!

IdratherbeclimbingM9
12/01/2014
1:37:43 PM
On 11/01/2014 patto wrote:
>RWC from any place in Victoria that wants to keep its license is generally
>pretty strict.
>
>A car like what you describe can often be worthless in Victoria. The
>fact that the rego has expired means that she also needs a VicRoads inspection
>when she re-registers it!

True, and being originally Qld plates(?), the inspection would likely be more thorough than they already tediously are...

Disposing of dead vehicles.
Car wreckers in Vic will pay about $200 for old vehicles, and they will pick it up for free, plus try to beat you down on price regardless of what they said they'd pay over the phone.
The catch for your friend in this instance, is that they will only take said vehicle if the current owner ie must be the last 'registered owner' if rego has lapsed, signs the disposal form.
This stops estranged parties selling off other peoples cars, ... but that would never happen would it?
Heh, heh, heh.
zorro
13/01/2014
10:39:27 AM
Maybe you should try SA. You oughta see the heaps of crap running around here. That's if you can get thru the city without one of our drivers slamming into you.

nmonteith
13/01/2014
11:22:59 AM
As others have said, changing the rego of a car to another state is way harder and more expensive. And you will probably need to get it visually checked by the state roads department themselves - so no chance of using a 'dodgy' mechanic to get a suss certificate.

There are hefty fines and lose of licenses for mechanics who get busted. I have found them much more reluctant to let things slip by. For example this year they told me my window tinting was too dark and needed removal - it's the same window tint I have had for 8 years!

IdratherbeclimbingM9
13/01/2014
4:46:36 PM
On 13/01/2014 nmonteith wrote:
>For example this year they told me my window tinting was too dark and needed removal - it's the same window tint I have had for 8 years!

When I had NSW rego renewed to Vic as a result of moving to Vic, it was the same deal.
The buggers required a new windscreen as it was allegedly hard to see through at sunrise/sunset, even though it had nil tint nor chips or cracks!
WTF?
... Then when I had the trailer re-registered they wanted a new coupling-hitch, as allegedly the old one did not comply, ... until I pointed out the certification numbers on the underside of it as part of the moulded final product...

All the above is doubly galling when the NSW rego requires annual inspection for renewal to pass, and Vic doesn't, with the result that heaps of crap are on the roads in Vic as they seldom ever get inspected...
Grrr x 3

nmonteith
13/01/2014
5:13:35 PM
I think the short version is - for a car worth $200 it will be WAY to much hassle to re-register it.

nmonteith
13/01/2014
5:15:21 PM
On 11/01/2014 emloughl wrote:
>It's a '91 Daihatsu Charade, with nearly 340,000 kms

You didn't buy it off Mike Law did you? He had one of those until a couple of years ago. I borrowed it a couple of times. Felt like an absolute death trap on wheels. I was terrified when it started raining.
jimfalla
13/01/2014
5:45:53 PM
Torn seat: hide under a cheapo seat cover. Worked for me.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
13/01/2014
5:55:10 PM
On 13/01/2014 nmonteith wrote:
>On 11/01/2014 emloughl wrote:
>>It's a '91 Daihatsu Charade, with nearly 340,000 kms
>
>You didn't buy it off Mike Law did you? He had one of those until a couple
>of years ago. I borrowed it a couple of times. Felt like an absolute death
>trap on wheels. I was terrified when it started raining.

Is this why you carry a machette, or is that the equivalent of a, Yatesbelay-knife for climbing with Mikl?
Heh, heh, heh.

JamesMc
13/01/2014
6:27:52 PM
You could check the Victorian roadworthiness rules at

http://consult.vicroads.vic.gov.au/document/show/150

IdratherbeclimbingM9
13/01/2014
6:43:05 PM
On 13/01/2014 JamesMc wrote:
>You could check the Victorian roadworthiness rules at
>
>http://consult.vicroads.vic.gov.au/document/show/150

ROADWORTHINESS REQUIREMENTS
7
Section G
Windscreen and Windows
All glazing used in a motor vehicle built after June 1953 is
to be safety glass or other approved material. The glazing
that is necessary to allow the driver to see the road and
other road users is not to be damaged or altered to the
extent that it prevents the vehicle being used safely.
Wear or Damage
During the service life of a vehicle, the windscreen and
windows may incur various types of damage. Testers are
advised that deterioration from the as new condition is
allowable and a windscreen or window with minor
damage should not be rejected.
A windscreen should only be rejected if;
it is discoloured, badly scratched, fractured or chipped
within the area wiped by the windscreen wiper(s) to
the extent that the drivers vision is so impaired that the
vehicle cannot be driven safely; or,
in the case of a laminated windscreen, it has any crack
that penetrates more than one layer of glass, or
in the case of a laminated windscreen, it has one or
more bulls eyes or star fractures over 16mm in diameter
or one or more cracks over 150mm in length in a single
layer of glass within the area wiped by the windscreen
wiper(s). One or more bulls eyes or star fractures up to
16mm in diameter and cracks up to 150mm in length
in a single layer of glass within the area wiped by the
windscreen wiper(s), are allowable provided that they
do not impair the drivers vision to the extent that the
vehicle cannot be driven safely.
Side windows that are scratched or otherwise damaged
to the extent that the driverís vision is so impaired that the
vehicle cannot be driven safely should also be rejected.
Where signaling devices are not provided, the driverís side
window must be capable of being opened or some other
means provided to give hand signals.
Repairs and Obstructions to View
In a repaired windscreen a faint outline of the repaired
damage or in some cases a slightly dull spot may be visible
where the repair has been performed. A repaired crack may
also be detectable by a fine hairline surface mark. These are
acceptable and should not be rejected during a roadworthy
test providing the rest of the windscreen complies with the
requirements as set out in this section.
Apart from any pillar or other part of the vehicleís structure
or fittings, there must be no internal obstructions to a driverís
view through the swept area of the windscreen, to the
right of the driverís position or 60į to the left of the driverís
position, except for the area outside the primary vision area.
Tinting Requirements
The primary vision area of the windscreen of a vehicle may
be lightly tinted to achieve a light transmittance of no less
than 75% if the vehicle was made after 1971, or 70% if made
earlier. Tinting in the primary vision area must have been
incorporated during the manufacture of the windscreen
and not by coating or tint films added afterwards.
Any tinting applied to the windows of a vehicle after it has
been manufactured must comply with the requirements
specified in VSI 2 (Window Tinting).
Primary Vision Area
For cars and other light vehicles, the primary vision area
can be approximated by excluding the area above the wiper
arc or the top 10% of the windscreen, whichever is the
greater. For heavy vehicles with large windscreens, exclude
the area above the wiper arc or above a horizontal line
200mm above the height of the driverís eye when seated in
the normal seating position, whichever is the greater, and
the area below the top of the steering wheel when looking
from the driverís seat in a normal seated position


I wish I had that information to present to the xxxxxxxx at the time...
Grrr x 4

There are 13 messages in this topic.

 

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