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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

Rave About Your Rack Please do not post retail SPAM.

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 30
Author
#1 & #2 size nuts and RPs.
BA
16/10/2006
11:59:42 AM
The reason the samallest RPs don't have a rating is that if you had a wire strong enough to get a rating it would be fatter that the RPs and wouldn't fit into a crack of the required size. A bit of a Catch 22 situation really.
darkxst
16/10/2006
12:09:09 PM
On 16/10/2006 BA wrote:
>The reason the samallest RPs don't have a rating is that

none of the RP's are rated are they?
gfdonc
16/10/2006
1:49:23 PM
A visiting UK climber told me last week that RPs aren't sold in Britain as they lack a certification (read: rating).
Anyone confirm or deny this?
BA
16/10/2006
4:36:15 PM
On 16/10/2006 darkxst wrote:
>On 16/10/2006 BA wrote:
>>The reason the samallest RPs don't have a rating is that

That of course should read "smallest". And here I am finalising the reprint of the SW Vic guide! Thankfully I've got a few other proof readers to rely on.

>none of the RP's are rated are they?

Even after all these years I still think of them as the smaller RPs. I'm still lucky enough to have a few of the older large ones with the different taper, Roland stopped making them years and years ago; a lot like my rack basically, cluttered as it is with Chouinard hexes, Clog 'biners and a set of the original rigid-stemmed Friends.

I don't think they are allowed into the UK (and by default, Europe?) I remember reading an article in The Age newspaper years ago about the problems that Roland was having selling his gear because the breaking strains were below certification levels.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
16/10/2006
4:45:09 PM
>about the problems that Roland was having selling his gear because the breaking strains were below certification levels.
It is a shame really because I find them extremely useful pieces.
Apart from aid, I can resonate with cruze 's post re using them in opposition to other gear.
gfdonc
16/10/2006
5:42:47 PM
Did Take Five last week on the RWF, a #1 RP was one of the few pieces of gear in pitch one that I though would take a fall. False confidence perhaps?

-deano-
16/10/2006
9:15:07 PM
On 6/10/2006 gfdonc wrote:
>I love equalising two pieces with a sliding X. Doesn't happen very often,
>but sometimes memorable. (I'm talking runners, not a belay). Jamming
>in multiple pieces sounds fine, but halving the impact force has gotta
>be better.
>

sounds like a great idea. would be good for cases when shock loading of one piece due to the other one failing is not an issue. that is, if each piece would not hold much on their own anyway they would be better off equalised. if one blows while equalised with the other, it wouldve popped anyway right?

i'd just be careful, and make sure that both of the shit pieces are equally as shit as each other. if you had one absolutely pathetic piece, and one not-so-good piece; then the pathetic one might fail no matter what, and you will shock load the other one and then...

post-edit: read Ronny's post below instead of this one.

>
anyway
...isnt take five on the left side?
gfdonc
17/10/2006
10:28:43 AM
Yes, oops, LWF.
By the way, if anyone is doing Wall of the Afternoon Sun, I suggest finishing up pitch 3 of Take Five is the way to go. Have done both routes recently. The Take Five finish is easier than it looks (18, one vaguely committing move) and had reasonable pro. But more importantly it's a great pitch in its own right.
Ronny
17/10/2006
10:47:59 AM
On 16/10/2006 -deano- wrote:
>i'd just be careful, and make sure that both of the shit pieces are equally
>as shit as each other. if you had one absolutely pathetic piece, and one
>not-so-good piece; then the pathetic one might fail no matter what, and
>you will shock load the other one and then...

Falling is a 'shock' load (dynamic load, not static). If the crappier piece takes *any* of the speed out of the fall before it blows you'll be putting less force on the other piece when you do load it, so you're better off than you would have been just clipping it alone.

The 'shock' load problem is more to do with loading a 'x-sling' statically (like at a belay) and then having one piece pop, resulting in a dynamic load on the other (as you fall 10cm or so onto it). So if pieces are crap at a belay this isn't a good idea as they may both fail.
MichaelOR
17/10/2006
11:41:22 AM
I remember reading that Roland didn't pursue certification of the RPs (for sale in Europe etc) because of the prohibitive cost for such a small operation. It wasn't worth the outlay for him. I seem to remember reading that the larger RPs ( eg #4, 5) are stronger than the small wires (eg #1 rock). It is the small RPs that that are the issue in practice for lead climbers.

When the rock and placement are both good (eg at Arapiles), small RPs can hold falls. Quite a few years ago at Araps I fell onto #1 and #2 RPs (equalised) and they held. My feet were certainly a bit above the gear when I fell. I'm a lot happier the bigger the RP or wire of course.

The placement is crucial as the brass can deform during a fall and possibly mean that the placement will fail. In my fall the RPs showed no sign of deforming as the placements were really good! ie lots of surface contact on both sides. The wire on the small RPs will snap (as do other small wires) with a hard enough fall. The wire on small rocks is weak at the point where it is threaded through the actual metal wedge. It is the radius of the curve and the thickness of the wire that is the issue. RPs do not have 'threaded wire'.

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 30
There are 30 messages in this topic.

 

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