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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

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 Page 3 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 56
Author
First Aid Kit

arniearms
30/08/2010
1:35:25 PM
chalk gets leeches off, but i just yank them off, and always checking every 10 mins for leeches when in damp areas or long grassy areas. about 1 in 5 leeches will give me a mild alergic reaction for a few days, so i tend to scrub the bite with antiseptic later in the day.

as for ant bites, i am very alergic, ur average jumping jack, green, bull or fire ant can instantly leave me sick and lethargic (almost a feeling of voluntary paralisys). effects usually wear off in a few hrs. is zertec or claratyne a good antihistamene to carry?

my only 1st aid item i carry is spray on skin for minor cuts, as im always getting minor nicks and scrapes.



tnd
30/08/2010
2:28:32 PM
If you pour salt or whatever onto a leech, the first thing it does is puke its gut contents into the wound. Best to get a knife blade and gently ease it in from the side to break the suction and grip.
Fizz
30/08/2010
3:44:46 PM
I carry 3 triangular bandages, 3 roller/crepe bandages and 2 20x20 combine dressings and that's about it.
3 triangular bandages is enough to anatomically splint one leg to the other or sling and immobilise an arm. You could use your clothing (throw in a few safetypins if you want to rely on this method). But for the weight and size of 3 triangles, I'd rather keep my clothes on or give them to the patient if it's cold.
3 good sized roller bandages should be enough to pressure bandage a leg in the case of a snake bite, and also to keep pressure on a haemorrhage. Put one of the combines over the bite site before bandaging as this will help with testing to ID the snake when the patient gets to hospital.
As for face shields and antihistamine tablets, I would question there need in bare essential first aid kit at the crag. Unless you're going climbing with the residents from then local aged care home, the type of accident that you are likely to encounter whilst climbing that cause the heart to stop is going to be terminal. A side from drowning or electrocution, the chances of successfully resussitating somebody after a traumatic injury leading to cardiac arrest are pretty much 0. However steps you take before this event if they are still alive may save their life.
You may want to start CPR for yourself so that you felt like you tried to do something which may help with your psychological state after the incident. Personally I don't have a problem with not starting a resus if the person is pale, no pulse and fixed and dilated pupils in the setting of major trauma.
If a person is know to have an anaphylactic reaction to a particular antigen, then they should be carrying their own epipen and other members of the party should know this and know how to use it. I would be interested to learn if the gut could digest antihistamine tablets before the patient arrest from circulatory collapse or asphyxiation due to occlution of the airway.
IMO education is the most important thing you can take out to the crag, knowing what to do and why is what is really going to make a difference. You can improvise everything else.
kieranl
1/09/2010
2:37:07 PM
I have heard of two interesting variations on appropriate first-aid kits for the mountains :

Kit 1. Bottle of whisky and frisbee. If it's too serious to be set right with the whisky you can play with the frisbee in the time you have left. (some lightweight himalayan trip).

Kit 2. some aspirin. If you're sore, swallow some. If you're bleeding, crush some and put into wound. (winter ascent of Sheila face of Cook)

cruze
1/09/2010
3:21:25 PM
On 1/09/2010 kieranl wrote:
>Kit 2. some aspirin. If you're sore, swallow some. If you're bleeding,
>crush some and put into wound. (winter ascent of Sheila face of Cook)
That's an interesting one, although I realise it is a bit tongue in cheek. The active ingredient in the aspirin tablet is likely to inhibit platelet aggregation and therefore inhibit clotting which would otherwise stem bleeding. So if that method is to have any noticeable effect it is more likely that the excipients in the tablets (the non-active bits like lactose) are probably doing the work of helping clot formation by just being kinda sterile impurities. In that case crushing almost any tablet into a wound would produce a similar, if not better effect than aspirin.

ajfclark
1/09/2010
3:27:19 PM
Chlorine tablets?

freesolo
1/09/2010
6:23:28 PM
for multipitch under 10 pitches and no walk off (don't need walking shoes), i get a large, but not boulders chalk bag, and put basic first aid stuff in there and pull the drawstring. easy to get to can be used for food as well. i dont climb with chalk unless it's in thailand.

best first aid item i ever had was a helmet. lycra pants stops bleeding pretty quickly. 2 meters of duct tape is great for splints and wounds. wrap it around your water bottle.

Miguel75
15/04/2013
7:22:54 PM
Thought I'd resurrect this thread and see what people are carrying out and about. Granted I'm a little heavy on the gear but it fits into a pretty small, action packed first aid kit with the following;

- Two 20x20 gauze pads
- Roll of medical tape
- 1 x triangular bandage
- 1 x emergency blanket
- 2 x Laerdal face shields
- Asst bandaids and wound dressings
- 4 x Butterfly sutures
- 2 x 15ml irrigation fluid
- Roll of tape (for jamming or strapping)
- A few safety pins
- Shears
- Lighter
- Sting-goes & Burn cream (small single use sachets)

If I'm heading somewhere remote I carry a bit of airway management gear and a few more bits and bobs...

Anybody else carry one, or anything different?
egosan
15/04/2013
7:36:59 PM
So much easier to maintain a good first aid kit if you can raid your work supplies. Many things I might want in a kit are unavailable or very expensive at your typcal pharmacy. Tea leaf.
Dave_S
15/04/2013
7:37:42 PM
On 15/04/2013 Miguel75 wrote:
>
>Anybody else carry one, or anything different?

Some additional items:
- Ibuprofen
- Compression bandage
- Instant ice-pack
- Condoms

Rolled an ankle in a ground-fall a few months back, and the first three of those items were very useful. I wasn't actually aware that I had the condoms in my first aid kit though, and was a little concerned when my belayer pulled them out while I was on the ground, immobilised...

Miguel75
15/04/2013
7:52:00 PM
On 15/04/2013 egosan wrote:
>So much easier to maintain a good first aid kit if you can raid your work
>supplies.

It also helps that my friend reps for Trafalgar first aid.

>Many things I might want in a kit are unavailable or very expensive
>at your typcal pharmacy.Tea leaf.

Your local pharmacy sells expensive tea leaf?

vwills
15/04/2013
10:54:36 PM
Tape, bandages, a knife and ibuprofen are usually in bag for cragging. I think this has been discussed before but in the instance of trauma mouth to mouth resuscitation isn't going to be successful. On the weekend we were going very light (aiming to do 20 pitches or so) and just had tape, which was actually quite useful. You can use a lot of climbing paraphenalia, clothing and outdoor gear to make things like stretchers, slings, splints, dressings etc.

If I'm on an expedition then or somewhere remote then the kit is very comprehensive with stuff including sutures, local anaesthetic, sam splints , lots of medication options, antiseptics and dressings, repair kit, cable ties etc. Blister dressings are the things I seem to give out most. (Comfeel and hypafix are my favourites for this)

Yes, work supplies are helpful. Lots of stuff in supermarket though.
Dr Nick
16/04/2013
5:14:45 AM
I suspect she's a bit tricky to fit in the takeaway container, but a VWills is apparently a really useful addition to a first aid kit.

Miguel75
16/04/2013
8:37:59 AM
On 16/04/2013 Dr Nick wrote:
>I suspect she's a bit tricky to fit in the takeaway container, but a VWills
>is apparently a really useful addition to a first aid kit.

True that:)

I agree with what Vwills and others have said about resuscitating those with obvious traumatic injuries. The likelihood of success is low though I'd argue that unless there are obvious signs of death (and you know what you're looking for) or you're a Dr./Ambo and capable of the correct diagnosis, people should do everything they've been taught in first aid training...

IdratherbeclimbingM9
16/04/2013
9:10:28 AM
Hey M75, vwills wrote;
>Blister dressings are the things I seem to give out most. (Comfeel and hypafix are my favourites for this)

I notice your 1st aid kit doesn't have any, so it is little wonder that all the odd shoes you keep finding on climbs have you a bit tensed up. I suggest either adding some, or teaspoon sachets of cement...
;-)

You wrote;
>Thought I'd resurrect this thread and see what people are carrying out and about.

After re-reading it I enjoyed the variety of responses it has had...

For my climbing 1st aid kit (with multipitch in mind and depending on the company I am in), gaffer tape, triangular bandage, and a space blanket. Sometimes I will add a couple of compression bandages if I am bushbashing to get climb access due slim possibility of a snakebite enroute.
Many times I will ditch the triangular bandage due (if needed) one can improvise with climbing slings etc.
My motorcycling 1st aid kit is more comprehensive!

I invariably ask (or already know), what my partner/s is taking on the same trip, and only try to supplement rather than double up.

After reading the responses, I think I will add some cable ties to my kits as well...


Miguel75
16/04/2013
12:35:30 PM
On 16/04/2013 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>Hey M75, vwills wrote;
>>Blister dressings are the things I seem to give out most. (Comfeel and
>hypafix are my favourites for this)

I prefer duct tape for blister protection;)

>I notice your 1st aid kit doesn't have any, so it is little wonder that
>all the odd shoes you keep finding on climbs have you a bit tensed up.
>I suggest either adding some, or teaspoon sachets of cement...
>;-)

I'm at tre play ground with the kids and have, oddly enough, found another shoe...

 Page 3 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 56
There are 56 messages in this topic.

 

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