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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 27
Author
Tendonosis of long head of biceps

Miguel75
24/04/2012
9:49:46 AM
Slightly OT question - has anyone torn the large head off the bone and had it repaired? What was the downtime after surgery, i.e. time to full strength/mobility?
PDRM
24/04/2012
9:54:22 AM
On 24/04/2012 Miguel75 wrote:
>Slightly OT question - has anyone torn the large head off the bone and
>had it repaired? What was the downtime after surgery, i.e. time to full
>strength/mobility?

Happened to one of my colleagues recently, complicated by comminuted # of the upper humerus. The answer to your question: long and painful.

P
Wendy
24/04/2012
9:56:05 AM
I wish it was only no Ogiving for a month! I think it's been more than that already ... i am going to take my gear out of it until next summer ... I've been planning to do that since easter.

Elaine, I suspect you have a point about the other issues affecting it, It's the same shoulder that I had problems with in 2009, which were related to over developed upper traps and tight pecs. I did see a local physio about this. She suggested rest, stretching and the inevitable rotator cuff exercises, although i've never had a problem with any of my rotator cuff. Horsham hospital finally got a climbing physio, then he takes a promotion and isn't seeing people anymore, sigh ... now I have to hassle him in person instead!

Miguel75
24/04/2012
4:41:49 PM
On 24/04/2012 PDRM wrote:
>Happened to one of my colleagues recently, complicated by comminuted #
>of the upper humerus. The answer to your question: long and painful.
>
>P

Aghh, not good for your friend. I did mine over 10 years ago and while it doesn't really bother me I've been wondering if it's worth getting fixed. I reckon it's the reason I climb like crap;)

ajfclark
25/04/2012
8:33:23 AM
Think you might've missed you windows there Miguel.
Elaine Stevenson
25/04/2012
11:01:26 AM
@Wendy - ah yes, totally understand the frustration of finding someone good and then having to replace them when they take on a new job / joys of finding time when friends/family can treat in their time off. I'll PM/email you the website/contact details of a musculoskeletal physio you could access easily from Nati who would well placed to assist. I spoke to them yesterday and I'm happy that the sort of problem you're describing is something which well fits within their scope.

@Miguel - I'm with AFJ on that one. While orthopods (surgeons) may have the tools etc to fix up the residual damage, the process of getting there would cause a truckload collateral damage (eg incisions, bone grafts etc etc) and you'd almost certainly be out of action for a sufficiently long time (months) to well and truly lose condition etc. That said, you probably do have options for improving function/performance without going under the knife, even 10 years down the track.

The sorts of things I'd be looking at would be a good osteo - sorting out inevitable structural compensations that occur following past injury etc is prime osteo territory. Other options you could consider include sessions with an EP (exercise physiologist), but have a talk to them first and get a sense of their understanding of climbers. You could also think about myo and physio too. There are highly skilled clinicians in both these fields who work more structurally/holistically - ie addressing residual compensations/limitations from past injuries etc.

People do pretty incredible things with significant deficits (eg fractures, joint replacements, amputations etc etc) so I don't for a minute think you'd be wasting your time, if you wanted to invest the effort etc.

BoulderBaby
25/04/2012
2:22:08 PM
>On 24/04/2012 Elaine Stevenson wrote:
>>Quick query, and off topic too (please forgive) Could someone advise
>the
>>name of the university which is teaching Clinical Myotherapy these days.
>> I know about the course at the Southern School of Natural Therapies
>where
>>Olivia (BB) studies, but they're a private institute/college, like Endeavour
>>etc, as are most of the places where Myo is taught. The only universities
>>I know that are teaching Myo are RMIT and VU and both of those currently
>>teach the government-accredited 2+ yr program.
>>
>>Cheers!


Bachelor of Health Sciences - Clinical Myotherapy is a 4 year university course, through Southern School of Natural therapies, Which is government accredited - or I wouldn't be getting fee help... The course is going to be rolled out aus wide through Think Education.

The Adv. Dip Myo course you've mentioned, are both tafe courses run through universities.

We have a few people in our course who have done the tafe course Adv. Dip of Remedial Massage (Myotherapy) at RMIT, who are currently re-training as they feel their depth of knowledge, particularly their musculoskeletal knowledge isn't thorough enough, and are at uni expanding and learning to treat more effectively.

On 24/04/2012 widewetandslippery wrote:
>
>So what you are saying is that this myo lot sticking needles in you have
>the training level of a beauty therapist?

If you are truely concerned about who is dry needling you, I'll try put this into perspective - a Physio does a 2 day weekend course in it, a Adv.Dip myo I understand does 6 months of it (as I understand the course structure is 2 years remedial massage, then myotherapy for 6months?) and a Clinical Myotherapist does 2 years in dry needling, 6 month of it is Pain/Dry needling theory, plus 2 semester of Musculoskeltal Structure,Cad Anat, and Surface Anatomy (Just like a physio) as well as a multitude of other subjects like pain management, treatment, diagnosis, and prescriptive exercises, at a university level.



 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 27
There are 27 messages in this topic.

 

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