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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

 Page 2 of 4. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 79
Author
My very first ground fall.
egosan
10/05/2010
9:40:07 PM
It is the bruising on my dignity that I am most concerned about. Happy to hear you are learning your lessons the easy way.

Sarah Gara
10/05/2010
11:00:51 PM
flipping heck sol. Glad you are ok -apart from bruises -could have been much worse.

Which ropes were you climbing on -out of interest? x
Doro
10/05/2010
11:26:55 PM
Think positive, surely it's character building
egosan
11/05/2010
6:15:43 AM
Thanks Sarah. I was on Andrew's single.

As far a character building goes, I view the dent in my dignity as a well needed deflation.

ajfclark
11/05/2010
7:22:25 AM
(He was starting to struggle to get through doors)
mikllaw
11/05/2010
1:08:38 PM
I'm obviously more scared than the average rack-crasher;- I raraely do a hard move unless I've got at least 2 bombers bits, and another one between me and the deck if they come out.
I'm still amazed that people don't climb on doubles any more. if you have 2 crappy wires (lets say they hold 3kN each), one 200 mm above the other, and fall on a single rope on them, they will go pop and pop. On double ropes, clipped independently, the load will spread between the 2 and the impact force will be lower also, and they have a good chance of staying in.

ajfclark
11/05/2010
1:14:25 PM
We did have a set of doubles on hand; Sol had used them to lead The Rack earlier in the day. As to Sol's call to use the single rather than the doubles, I'm not sure what his thought process was there: I said which ropes and he said the single.

With the gear placed, I'm not sure doubles would've helped. If he had clipped alternate strands, the hex would likely still have popped, he would've fallen on the lower piece with less slack but a lot more stretch.

Phil Box
11/05/2010
2:28:41 PM
Yeah, I'm a big fan of doubles too. Mind you I also climb on a single. Big tall wandery routes = doubles every time. Straight up Frog routes = single most of the time.
simey
11/05/2010
3:08:12 PM
When I am so pumped that I can't think straight, I use the few brain cells still receiving oxygen to place more gear instead of rushing the next move and hoping for the best.

The reality is that if you want to climb harder routes you need to learn to place gear in strenuous situations and shake-out effectively. Taking a silly risk to get up some intermediate route is not going to help you in the long term to climb harder routes safely.


gordoste
11/05/2010
3:21:43 PM
ajfclark witnessed me grovelling my way up Toccata the other day, i had a piece lift out after i climbed past it which didn't make me happy. i don't like the way all the placements are so damn polished, it doesn't inspire confidence in cams. i also found it quite burly for 15! anyone else think that?

edit: btw i know it used to be 14, but it's still burly!

mattjr
11/05/2010
10:12:59 PM
On 11/05/2010 mikllaw wrote:
>I'm obviously more scared than the average rack-crasher;- I raraely do
>a hard move unless I've got at least 2 bombers bits, and another one between
>me and the deck if they come out.
>I'm still amazed that people don't climb on doubles any more. if you have
>2 crappy wires (lets say they hold 3kN each), one 200 mm above the other,
>and fall on a single rope on them, they will go pop and pop. On double
>ropes, clipped independently, the load will spread between the 2 and the
>impact force will be lower also, and they have a good chance of staying
>in.
>

It's funny you should mention doubles Mikl, all I have seen Sol climb on at Araps since he bought his doubles are.. his doubles. What were you doing climbing on Andrews single Sol? Don't you know those things are dangerous?!

ambyeok
11/05/2010
10:20:06 PM
On 11/05/2010 simey wrote:
>If you are so pumped that you can't think straight, then use the few brain
>cells that are still receiving oxygen to place more gear instead of rushing
>into the next move and hoping for the best.

Theres also downclimbing and resting on the gear. At a point in time you have to make the call. The only thing that will help you climb harder routers is resting on the gear.
simey
11/05/2010
10:23:38 PM
How will resting on the gear help you climb harder routes?

ambyeok
11/05/2010
10:54:23 PM
On 11/05/2010 simey wrote:
>How will resting on the gear help you climb harder routes?

Twas a joke. But it seems to help M9.
egosan
11/05/2010
11:01:49 PM
On 11/05/2010 ambyeok wrote:
>Twas a joke. But it seems to help M9.

Now I am laughing.



mikllaw
12/05/2010
8:23:28 AM
One other thing, it's not a gym; you shouldn't be falling off unexpectedly. Particularly not on crap gear
egosan
12/05/2010
9:26:29 AM
On 12/05/2010 mikllaw wrote:
>One other thing, it's not a gym; you shouldn't be falling off unexpectedly.
>Particularly not on crap gear

Really? Wow. In know I really shouldn't be flippant, but Mikl, how did you come to that conclusion?

We have all seen Neil's ground fall video. Another fabulous example of what not to do. What about you Mikl? What hard lessons are you going to share with us?

cruze
12/05/2010
9:48:05 AM
I am just trying to visualise how the fall occurred. Out of interest, were you using floppy draws - ie not rigid sports draws?

If I feel that a piece of gear (especially passive) is a little unidirectional (say only really good for downwards forces) then I use a 30 or even 60 cm draw. It is amazing how much difference this can make to a marginal piece - especially a top piece. That way if you fall equal with the piece, the slack in the system allows the force only to be applied in a generally downward direction, thereby hopefully helping prevent any gear experiencing a hard outwards force which can happen especially if your belayer is possibly being a little over-attentive (ie rope is too tight). I also extend marginal pieces clipped equal with me or above me to reduce the amount of rope in the system if ledge or ground fall is a possibility, and where I can see a better placement up higher.

I guess you have learnt a pretty hard lesson here and am glad you are OK. I think that the plug and go mentality is overused (I see it all too often with people naivly pushing grades when they are starting out - not saying you are in this category I don't know you at all) especially at Araps where ledges abound on easier routes.
egosan
12/05/2010
10:05:25 AM
On 12/05/2010 cruze wrote:
>I am just trying to visualise how the fall occurred. Out of interest, were
>you using floppy draws - ie not rigid sports draws?

It was a floppy draw but only of the 20 cm variety.

>If I feel that a piece of gear (especially passive) is a little unidirectional
>(say only really good for downwards forces) then I use a 30 or even 60
>cm draw. It is amazing how much difference this can make to a marginal
>piece - especially a top piece. That way if you fall equal with the piece,
>the slack in the system allows the force only to be applied in a generally
>downward direction, thereby hopefully helping prevent any gear experiencing
>a hard outwards force which can happen especially if your belayer is possibly
>being a little over-attentive (ie rope is too tight). I also extend marginal
>pieces clipped equal with me or above me to reduce the amount of rope in
>the system if ledge or ground fall is a possibility, and where I can see
>a better placement up higher.

Good advice. Stuff that I put in practice regularly.

>I guess you have learnt a pretty hard lesson here and am glad you are
>OK. I think that the plug and go mentality is overused (I see it all too
>often with people naivly pushing grades when they are starting out - not
>saying you are in this category I don't know you at all) especially at
>Araps where ledges abound on easier routes.

I see that place clearly in my head. With the wisdom of a hard lesson behind me, it is easy to see how bad it was. I am not sure any extending would have helped. The doubles might have. They might have also let me slap the ground that much harder.

We will see how much I learn from this lesson next time I am leading trad. I can only speculate how it will affect me.

ajfclark
12/05/2010
11:30:21 AM
On 12/05/2010 egosan wrote:
>On 12/05/2010 cruze wrote:
>>I am just trying to visualise how the fall occurred. Out of interest, were you using floppy draws - ie not rigid sports draws?
>
>It was a floppy draw but only of the 20 cm variety.

Depends on your definition of floppy. I'm pretty sure it was a Helium or Xenon or something wasn't it? It was a slung hex if that assists with your visualisation.

 Page 2 of 4. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 79
There are 79 messages in this topic.

 

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