Goto Chockstone Home

  Guide
  Gallery
  Tech Tips
  Articles
  Reviews
  Dictionary
  Links
  Forum
  Search
  About

      Sponsored By
      ROCK
   HARDWARE

  Shop

Black Diamond: SET of 8 "C4" Cams and 8 matching wire gates. Sizes .3 .4 .5 .75 1 2 3 & 4 and 8 anodised "neutrino" - wire gate karabiners.   $625.00
20% Off

Chockstone Photography Australian Landscape Photography by Michael Boniwell
Australian Landscape Prints





Chockstone Forum - Find Climbers

Find Climbers In Your Area

Author
Europe Alps in July - Partner needed
Mike Bee
19/05/2014
3:13:17 PM
Hey all,

I've been scheming a trip to Europe for some mountain action for ages. I had a partner lined up, but he's notouriously flakely, and let me know a couple of weeks ago that he wasn't available for it after all. Not super impressed.

So, I'm an Adelaide based climber heading to Europe (leaving Australia 2nd or 3rd July), and I'm a free agent until August when my girlfriend comes over. I'm definitely keen on climbing some mountains, and if there was someone who spoke English who I could pair up with, that'd be amazing!

I climb onsight trad in the high teens, repoint on bolts into the mid 20s, have had a couple of weeks in NZ, and spent 6 weeks ice climbing in Canada. I'm pretty fit, nice and safe, and I'd be keen for anything (my inital plans were to do/try Mont Blanc, The Matterhorn and then maybe the Eiger (Mittellegi Ridge) if the weather was being friendly).

But really, as long as its beautiful and high, I'm pretty happy regardless.

If anyone is keen, let me know!
Doro
20/05/2014
6:05:55 AM
I'll pm you.
billby
20/05/2014
10:12:02 PM
Check out also the Swiss climber's forum: www.gipfelbuch.ch / Pinboard
Wendy
Online Now
21/05/2014
8:16:47 AM
Hi Mike, The Maison de la Montagne in Chamonix has a meet climbers book. It has lots of English speaking climbers in it, rather a lot of whom are looking for a partner for Mt Blanc. Personally, I wouldn't go near Mt Blanc, it is a circus. The huts are booked out well before the start of the season, and the Gouter hut is maybe 200 beds to give you an idea of the crowds. The Chardonet is a gorgeous peak, I'd do that instead if I was ever going to doing snowy nonsense again. The modern long rock routes are amazing though. A week at the Envers refuge is well worth it, as are a few days on the Blatiere.
Mike Bee
1/06/2014
10:10:51 PM
Hey all,

Thanks for the PMs and thanks to Wendy for some advice. Part of my Mont Blanc idea is to see how I go at the higher altitude, but I have definitely heard it's very busy!

A few more questions for those with experience of the area:
- which campsite generally has the most climbers in it? There seems to be heaps thorughout the area
- what kind of trad gear is required? I have a full double rack here, but it's heavy, so I'm a bit skeptical about flying over with all that stuff unless it's likely to be needed. Are there many wider features, will a #5 and #6 see much use?
- Do people get many ice screws in over there in summer? I know in NZ they're a bit of a dubious piece in the summer, but Europe is higher, so maybe gets better freezes? If so, are longs the way to go?

We'll be staying in the UK for a few months after Europe, so I spose the question about trad gear extends to there too. Even cutting out the 4, 5 and 6 and the double 2 and 3 cams would save heaps of weight and space on the flight over, but I'd hate toget there and discover that some mega classic moderate alpine rock route has a splitter hand crack on it!
martym
1/06/2014
10:23:29 PM
Hey Mike,
Chamonix is a tourist town - luckily about half of those tourists are solid climbers.
I can't remember the name, but we stayed at a campsite outside of the township - past Les Gaillands - with dozens of climbers - many there for the whole season.
As for Zermat - there's a dingy campsite just by the train station run by an old climbing guide - you can probably bump into a few climbers there. It definitely has a different vibe to Chamonix though - far more tourists there to take photos than climbing. Haven't been to Grindelwald yet so don't know.

Also - try UKClimbing.co.uk and ask around; there's bound to be someone there who'll meet your needs!
maxdacat
2/06/2014
9:35:46 AM
On 1/06/2014 Mike Bee wrote:
>Hey all,
>
>Thanks for the PMs and thanks to Wendy for some advice. Part of my Mont
>Blanc idea is to see how I go at the higher altitude, but I have definitely
>heard it's very busy!
>
>A few more questions for those with experience of the area:
>- which campsite generally has the most climbers in it? There seems to
>be heaps thorughout the area
>- what kind of trad gear is required? I have a full double rack here,
>but it's heavy, so I'm a bit skeptical about flying over with all that
>stuff unless it's likely to be needed. Are there many wider features, will
>a #5 and #6 see much use?
>- Do people get many ice screws in over there in summer? I know in NZ
>they're a bit of a dubious piece in the summer, but Europe is higher, so
>maybe gets better freezes? If so, are longs the way to go?

For Cham - a good place to start is the Gite le Vagabond. Get a bunk there for a few days and you'll easily meet some climbers. It's also walking distance to Les Gaillands which isn't great climbing but can be good for sussing your potential partners belaying and rope work. I then headed up the valley to camping Glacier Argetiere. A good route to get started on is L'Index which is accessed from the top of the flegere chair. It's 5-6 pitches long and really only needs a rack of a few nuts and cams since there lots of pegs and threads.
I think the place to aim for would be the Envers (see the Piola guide of a few years ago) and base yourself at one of the huts below. I haven't climbed there (yet) but from what i've heard the slabs are harshly graded but the cracks will feel soft if you have a trad background. I would bank on bolted belays and a few pegs on each pitch if that helps. South face of the midi would also be worthwhile eg Rebuffat route.
People might take 1 or 2 screws as part of their crevasse kit but you can get by without in summer esp if focusing on rock. Technically for the walk in to Envers or Midi you will be on a glacier but crampon and axe should be sufficient as it is so well travelled.
stuart h
2/06/2014
2:40:20 PM
Mont Blanc is relatively straightforward provided you have some time to acclimatize. The refuges are heavily booked in advance but space often becomes available again at shorter notice. The Three Mont Blancs route is not unreasonable to do off the first Midi teleferique. I understand that one of the refuges on the Matterhorn is closed this season so make sure you have checked up on that.

There are lots of easy –moderate snowy things to do while you acclimatize. UKclimbing, CampToCamp & most importantly the Maison de la Montagne will give you the best sources of info on what has been getting climbed and is therefore likely to be in reasonable conditions. Nowadays July is late for most ice (you could still do the Chere if you are desperate – mostly rock gear anyway – or the Frendo or similar where you might want more than a couple of screws depending on your mood) so just a couple of screws should be fine. You can often do a lot of fun climbing in the Aiguille Rouges without needing to put boots on at all.

The classic alpine pillars should have melted clear during your trip if you are after that sort of thing. I think the best fun to be had in summer is the modern alpine rock climbing on features like the Blatiere, the Peigne and my favourite climbing location, the refuge des envers des aiguilles. You should find lots to do as there is almost limitless climbing from 6a to 6c+ (usually the obligatory grade is around 6a-6b).
A light rack & two ropes does the job on most of these modern routes – there aren’t a lot of splitters around the place, anywhere you can’t get standard gear will have a peg or bolt and the belays will be equipped for rappel so that you can get back to your axe& boots. I have always carried 5-6 cams from finger to fist(#3camalot or smaller), a set of wires (incl large) and about 10 draws. I certainly wouldn’t carry big gear or doubles (maybe throw in a link cam if you want a back-up) – the cracks and the climbing are quite featured.

Now I use a digital camera for the topos (topos &/or copies of the guidebooks are available in the mountain house in Chamonix and in the refuges) but in the past I used to trace them and you can photocopy in the mountain house. These details are mostly about Chamonix but there are similar opportunities across the alps – if you can cope with the Swiss Frank there is a lot of great rock (and skiing) in neutral territory.

Have fun.
PKinnane
2/06/2014
7:19:52 PM
Hi Mike. I'm also from Adelaide, heading to Morzine (50km's from Mt Blanc?) 28th June, returning 14th'ish July. Let me know if you are after some sport climbing in the area.

Paul

There are 9 messages in this topic.

 

Home | Guide | Gallery | Tech Tips | Articles | Reviews | Dictionary | Forum | Links | About | Search
Chockstone Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography

Please read the full disclaimer before using any information contained on these pages.



Australian Panoramic | Australian Coast | Australian Mountains | Australian Countryside | Australian Waterfalls | Australian Lakes | Australian Cities | Australian Macro | Australian Wildlife
Landscape Photo | Landscape Photography | Landscape Photography Australia | Fine Art Photography | Wilderness Photography | Nature Photo | Australian Landscape Photo | Stock Photography Australia | Landscape Photos | Panoramic Photos | Panoramic Photography Australia | Australian Landscape Photography | Mothers Day Gifts | Gifts for Mothers Day | Mothers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Mothers Day | Wedding Gift Ideas | Christmas Gift Ideas | Fathers Day Gifts | Gifts for Fathers Day | Fathers Day Gift Ideas | Ideas for Fathers Day | Landscape Prints | Landscape Poster | Limited Edition Prints | Panoramic Photo | Buy Posters | Poster Prints