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Chockstone Forum - Crag & Route Beta

Crag & Route Beta

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 21
Area Location Sub Location Crag Links
All NSW (General) (General) (General)  

Author
Grid reference for The Emu?
mikl law
18/02/2009
8:31:06 AM
Anyone have one?
The old SRC mountains guide gave
580 562
on the Jamison sheet, edition unknown
Whatever you have, can you tell me what map edition it is (AMG or MGA grid, yes they shifted b a few hundred metres a while back) or Lat and long or Australian Geocentric 1994 (GDA94)

nmonteith
18/02/2009
9:25:42 AM
On a side thought - what are other peoples thoughts on the 'future' of map references now that everyone is starting to use GPS? It's predicted that within 2 years every mobile phone will have the ability to locate your position and show it on a map to within a few metres accuracy. Map references are great if you have the right map, but I would think that GPS co-ord might be a better future proof way of recording climb locations? Just a thought...

rodw
18/02/2009
9:32:18 AM
Without knowing.....does the gps on a mobile phone use the mobile phone network or come straight from satellite? If the former going to be pretty useless considering coverage aint that great at remote crags and well travelled crags you really just follow the well worn path.
jrc
18/02/2009
9:33:33 AM
You can get the map ref downloaded onto your GPS so it reads out position as a grid ref. Makes working with an aussie map very easy.

nmonteith
18/02/2009
9:35:04 AM
Real GPS Rod. iPhones and several other models from Nokia ect have had in-built GPS for a few years now. Mike is building up a database for rescue purposes I think.
jrc
18/02/2009
9:51:14 AM

http://adunk.ozehosting.com/MapsAndDatums.html explains how to read grid refs as the gps displays them

note they read as individual eastngs (to 1m) and nrthings. The 6 digit combined ref is to the nearest 100m.

You should have the aus UTM grid 66 & 94 in the data selection menus of the gps

pmonks
18/02/2009
9:52:30 AM
Depends on the iPhone: gen 2+ have true GPS but gen 1 triangulates based on the cellular network.

The problem with the iPhone (regardless of the generation, and may be a problem with other GPS enabled phones too?) is that the maps are pulled down over the cellular data network on demand, so if you're not in a coverage area the phone knows exactly where it is (based on GPS) but can only show you a blinking blue stick pin in a sea of grey.

EDIT: of course none of this is relevant if the purpose isn't for climbers to locate climbs using their phones...

rodw
18/02/2009
9:53:54 AM
Shit ya learn eh (im obviously not much of a mobile phone user).

Btw John Hollit from careflight has a document they use for rescue purposes (for Sydney and surrounds) uploaded on Cragx..as said from him...

"This is used by Careflight to locate crags in and around Sydney for rescure purposes.This is not a rock climber's guide. At some of these areas climbing is banned or illegal. Cliff environments are dangerous and people do die or get badly mangled up - hence this document. It would be useful to have in your backpack on any climbing trip incase you get into trouble."

http://www.cragx.org/Sydneyrescueguide.doc

No gps in it, but since its what they reference, just as useful.

nmonteith
18/02/2009
9:54:31 AM
On 18/02/2009 pmonks wrote:
>Depends on the iPhone: gen 2+ have true GPS but gen 1 triangulates based
>on the cellular network.

ah - i stand corrected!

>The problem with the iPhone (regardless of the generation, and may be
>a problem with other GPS enabled phones too?) is that the maps are pulled
>down over the cellular data network on demand, so if you're not in a coverage
>area the phone knows exactly where it is (based on GPS) but can only show
>you a blinking blue stick pin in a sea of grey.

Surely someone has written some sort of ap that has the maps stored internally? I guess if not now, then probably by next week :-)
Richard Delaney
18/02/2009
11:02:13 AM
This location depends on the phone and what software it is running.
There are two ways of obtaining position.
A nokia N95 for example has a real on-board GPS but this is only 'on' if the user turns it
on - it drains the battery much faster. This is the case for all GPS equipped phones
that I'm aware of.
For GPS and non-GPS phones the position can also be obtained from proximity to the
carrier cell tower. This may triangulate if you are in an area with many towers but linear
areas (like the Blue Mountains) will generally only have one tower in range so you may
get a big circle of xxxxm radius from that tower.

Richard Delaney
18/02/2009
11:06:10 AM
Nokia Maps stores the maps internally (as opposed to Google Maps which pulls
maps/air photos from the web).
Regardless of on-screen maps and network coverage, the GPS can be used stand-
alone and produce grid refs.
Winston Smith
18/02/2009
12:29:51 PM
On 18/02/2009 mikl law wrote:
>Anyone have one?
>The old SRC mountains guide gave
>580 562
>on the Jamison sheet, edition unknown
>Whatever you have, can you tell me what map edition it is (AMG or MGA
>grid, yes they shifted b a few hundred metres a while back) or Lat and
>long or Australian Geocentric 1994 (GDA94)
>

After all that techo talk Mikl ...
A few of us did the route three years ago and one bloke had a GPS. He thinks he might still have the numbers in his unit. I will have to get back to you tomorrow.
deadpoint
18/02/2009
2:24:15 PM


Google earth is your friend, zoom into the location read co-ordinates off screen in
Lat/Long in WGS84 co-ordinates.

Depending on the quality of the image you can retrieve co-ordinates of rubbish bin size
objects.



mikl law
19/02/2009
8:51:22 AM
On 18/02/2009 deadpoint wrote:

>Google earth is your friend, zoom into the location read co-ordinates
>off screen in Lat/Long in WGS84 co-ordinates.

Unless of course you don't know where it is, which is why I'm asking. I've done that process with the other 2500 climbs in the Blueys already
Winston Smith
19/02/2009
9:25:38 AM
- 33 48.227', 150 23.240'

Mate try the above. I think it's the base of the climb.

On Google you can see a notch in the cliff top - that's identifiably the top out.

Also here's the GPS reference for the first rap point which is a little down a hill. There are some slings around a banksia (!) which we didn't use. We took static and used that as a sling around a solid gum tree a few metres back from the cliff edge.

- 33 48.349', 150 23.191'
mikl law
19/02/2009
12:17:02 PM
Thanks a lot, it look right, I'll have to go do it now

dave h.
22/10/2012
6:44:54 PM
*bump*

Does anyone have any beta for the Emu? Am looking for a nice scary adventure route to catch up with a friend on. Trying to convince myself that The Emu is the right climb for this trip...

I haven't checked my copy of the SRC guide yet, but if you need or were grateful for any unusual pieces (Cams above #4 WC/BD, extra large/extra small wires, etc) that'd be really handy to know... Retreating because the #6 is in the car would suck!!

Also, does anyone remember how long it took them to get up? My friend and I managed Tom Thumb in about 3 hours (starting raps til topping out). But we've got some deadlines to climb to this time...


So yeah, any info appreciated :-)
TonyB
22/10/2012
8:53:57 PM
On 19/02/2009 ZZZZZZZZZZZ wrote:
>- 33 48.227', 150 23.240'

Strange, Google on my system only gives decimals eg -33.400, 150.400
Lands Dept maps give decimals plus "deg,min,sec" as well as MGA56 etc, plus a lot of other info.
http://imagery.maps.nsw.gov.au/#

Andrew_M
22/10/2012
9:28:02 PM
Hey Dave, tried to message you but your inbox is full.

Do you have a copy of the Emu topo that used to be online (but doesn't seem to be any more). I think I've got a pdf somewhere if you don't already have it.

Of course having the topo is gonna decrease the adventure a bit...

dave h.
22/10/2012
11:45:29 PM
Thanks Andrew and Tony B.

Andrew, I don't think I have the topo. There's a topo in the Sydney Rockies 1983 guidebook, but if there's something that gives a bit more information I would like to see it. I've cleaned out my inbox and sent you my email via pm if that makes life easier...

I'm sure the route will still provide quite a lot of adventure...

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 21
There are 21 messages in this topic.

 

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