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Chockstone Forum - Crag & Route Beta

Crag & Route Beta

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 35
Area Location Sub Location Crag Links
VIC All (General) (General) (General) [ Victoria Guide | Images ] 

Author
Feathertop

rodw
15/08/2011
3:47:54 PM
That looks like good ski terrain right off the summit too?
One Day Hero
15/08/2011
4:15:03 PM
Can we please stop referring to the top of a hill in victoria as "the summit"? Also, "false summit", "summit ridge", and other terms commonly used by mountaineers when describing mountains?

Climbers from other countries might read this stuff, and I'm starting to feel embarassed. If you want to act out your mountaineering fantasies in the total safety and comfort of the australian foothills (alps), go right ahead.....but please be a bit discrete about it.

StuckNut
15/08/2011
4:34:06 PM
Sorry, for future reference when reading the above TR, please replace the words 'summit' with 'bump', and 'ice-axe' with 'technical walking stick'.
Fish Boy
16/08/2011
4:23:03 PM
On 15/08/2011 Sabu wrote:
>ha! I'd much rather "drag" an axe up there than a pair of skis, ski boots
>and poles!!
>

You are clearly not a skier. Enjoy pretending you're a mountaineer.
Fish Boy
16/08/2011
4:23:57 PM
On 15/08/2011 One Day Hero wrote:
>Can we please stop referring to the top of a hill in victoria as "the summit"?
>Also, "false summit", "summit ridge", and other terms commonly used by
>mountaineers when describing mountains?
>
>Climbers from other countries might read this stuff, and I'm starting
>to feel embarassed. If you want to act out your mountaineering fantasies
>in the total safety and comfort of the australian foothills (alps), go
>right ahead.....but please be a bit discrete about it.

Ya, my thoughts exactly. You coming over here soon?
simey
16/08/2011
5:06:37 PM
The word 'cornice' is okay to use, providing it meets the standard as set by the UIAA for minimum cornice requirements. But a sub-clause states that should the cornice be within Australia the use of skiis is still the only acceptable means for negotiating such terrain.
One Day Hero
17/08/2011
1:02:00 AM
On 16/08/2011 Fish Boy wrote:
>Ya, my thoughts exactly. You coming over here soon?

How's the weather been, mate? Wendy reckoned it was pretty soggy a few weeks back. I really miss that bit of the world, hope you're getting lots of cool stuff done.
Fish Boy
17/08/2011
4:26:58 PM
Been here for 15 days, not one drop of rain. The next 6 days are perfect low twenties. I'm in heaven, even parked my car next to Honnold's today, so badass....

StuckNut
25/08/2011
10:19:19 AM
Very sad, but makes me feel better about the decision to carry ice-axe/crampons up the 'hill'.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-24/cross-country-skier-falls-down-embankment/2854196

nmonteith
25/08/2011
10:24:32 AM
On 25/08/2011 StuckNut wrote:
>Very sad, but makes me feel better about the decision to carry ice-axe/crampons
>up the 'hill'.
>
>http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-24/cross-country-skier-falls-down-embankment/2854196

I heard this reported as a 700m cliff this morning on the radio. I actually didn't hear the start of the story and presumed they were talking about somewhere overseas...

cruze
25/08/2011
10:51:43 AM
Very sad indeed.

On a separate matter, please also don't assume that carrying an ice axe and wearing crampons will necessarily lessen the consequence of a slip. They may help prevent a slip (asusming you know how to use them) but unless you know how to self arrest an axe could be likened to a glorified walking pole. Even knowing how to self arrest may not help you if you quickly gather speed down an icy slope. Practice, practice, practice (without crampons to start) before you get yourself on high-consequence terrain to get a feel for how difficult it will be! This experience doesn't come with the sales receipt!
climberman
25/08/2011
10:58:15 AM
On 25/08/2011 nmonteith wrote:
>On 25/08/2011 StuckNut wrote:
>>Very sad, but makes me feel better about the decision to carry ice-axe/crampons
>>up the 'hill'.
>>
>>http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-08-24/cross-country-skier-falls-down-embankment/2854196
>
>I heard this reported as a 700m cliff this morning on the radio. I actually
>didn't hear the start of the story and presumed they were talking about
>somewhere overseas...

http://www.edenmagnet.com.au/news/local/news/general/eden-doctor-killed-in-victorian-skiing-accident/2270158.aspx

I have skied with him, shared a tent, bloody lovely guy. Experienced guy, loved his BC skiing, wilderness surfing and the outdoors. Three kids and a wife. Fark.

StuckNut
25/08/2011
11:42:02 AM
On 25/08/2011 cruze wrote:

>On a separate matter, please also don't assume that carrying an ice axe
>and wearing crampons will necessarily lessen the consequence of a slip.
>They may help prevent a slip (asusming you know how to use them) but unless
>you know how to self arrest an axe could be likened to a glorified walking
>pole. Even knowing how to self arrest may not help you if you quickly gather
>speed down an icy slope. Practice, practice, practice (without crampons
>to start) before you get yourself on high-consequence terrain to get a
>feel for how difficult it will be! This experience doesn't come with the
>sales receipt!

No arguments here!

I know how to self arrest and have practised it before in the backcountry under controlled conditions(lower angled slopes). I couldn't agree more with everything you said.

Which is all the more reason, as a novice, to carry them even if conditions may not necessitate them, if only to allow you to practise the skills for when conditions do!

Sabu
25/08/2011
11:55:52 AM
My condolences to friends and family (and you climberman). From what's on ski.com it looks like he was a very well respected and experienced skier. Very sad.

I guess this shows that even though our "mountains" may be relatively tame in comparison to other countries, we should not allow ourselves to become complacent. They can still be dangerous.
gfdonc
25/08/2011
3:06:46 PM
Anyone using poles with self-arrest grips? Saw some of these years ago but none recently.
Are they any use?

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 35
There are 35 messages in this topic.

 

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