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Author
WTB: climbing bag for carry on
bones
Online Now
31/07/2013
2:36:50 PM
Hi all,
Interested if anyone has any tips for a smaller climbing pack that can fit a rack etc but is also small enough to pass as carry on for most airlines. Thinking maybe 30 litre.
If anyone knows of a good one or has one they might like to sell id love to hear about it.
Thanks

phillipivan
31/07/2013
2:46:04 PM
Most 30L and some 40L packs will get by no problem. On my recent trip to NZ my partner and I both took our climbing packs as carry on; both are probably about 40L.

Since airlines are getting stricter about carry on weight (I was checked), it's probably worth preferencing a lightweight model so you can take a little more stuff and still be inside be limit.

There are plenty of options that will do the job.
bones
Online Now
31/07/2013
4:26:41 PM
yeah I have a 45 litre one (too big) and a 35 litre that's probably ok for most airlines but not all. Keen for something a bit smaller for convenience and to be confident with some of the smaller internal airlines where they can be funny about the size

phillipivan
31/07/2013
5:01:17 PM
Which airlines is a 35 pack too large for? A nice soft pack will look smaller when it is not packed as full, especially with judicious use of compression straps.

I struggle to imagine a pack I would be happy to climb with that I couldn't take as carry on. By the time it's too large for carry on, it probably pretty annoying to climb with.
Mike Bee
31/07/2013
5:02:57 PM
I regularly fly with my 45L pack as carry on and have never had an issue (for either domestic or international flights).

I have flown with my mountain pack (a very generous 55L pack) before too, and again I haven't had any issues, though for this one I take out the aluminium back stays and waistbelt.

It doesn't matter what size the back is, the trick is to keep it light (or at least looking like it is light), and not make it full. If you have a full 45 you won't get on, but if you have an empty 60 you may have no problems at all.

adski
31/07/2013
7:47:31 PM
Er, it *does* matter about bag size - max dimensions need to be adhered to for overhead stowage, or the 'can it pass through this metal ring' test

phillipivan
31/07/2013
7:56:58 PM
Yes, but a soft bag, like a pack without a metal frame, can compress to meet those requirements if not overfilled.
huwj
31/07/2013
8:31:38 PM
Phil's spot on.

I have a Pod Alpine 40 pack and can't recommend it highly enough. You can't buy them in Oz but plenty of UK stores ship them out here for cheap. Awesome bit of gear.

Never had an issue taking it as carry-on on international flights. It's a great size. A couple of times when it's been really full they've weighed it to make sure it's within the weight limit.

The trick is to fill it with all your clothes and boots. So if they check it and it turns out it's too big or too heavy you just have to get on the plane wearing your downie, hardshell, helmet, mountain boots etc etc. And then as soon as you're on the plane, chuck them all back in the bag!

http://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/review.php?id=2843

BoulderBaby
31/07/2013
9:07:01 PM
I got my BD demon on a fair few times!

phillipivan
31/07/2013
10:10:20 PM
I always wear my big ass mountain boots on to the plane if its an alpine trip. I've got huge feet and they weigh a lot; I've had my bag checked for weight once on board the plane, so I no longer assume that since Im through security I'm good to go. I take em off once seated and leave them under the seat.
PDRM
1/08/2013
9:01:26 AM
60L Patagonia Black Hole duffel is a great size for carry on, opens right up like a bag but can be worn as a pack.
Mike Bee
1/08/2013
9:31:33 AM
On 31/07/2013 adski wrote:
>Er, it *does* matter about bag size - max dimensions need to be adhered
>to for overhead stowage, or the 'can it pass through this metal ring' test

But that will only relate to a rigid pack, the rigidity comes from the stays up the back, they are removable, with varying amounts of effort, from almost every climbing pack I've seen.
Certainly most mountaineering packs have removeable stays as a feature to reduce weight.

There are 12 messages in this topic.

 

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