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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 3 of 4. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 70
Author
John Kazanas summits Everest
dalai
29-May-2010
3:28:41 PM
If you wanted to belittle the idea of climbing Everest or some other such challenge, it would have been better to post a seperate topic. This topic was to congratulate John for getting out there and living his dream. Just because it doesn't float your boat and have the same dreams as others doesn't mean it isn't any less valid than yours.

Congratulations John for turning a dream into reality!
climbingjac
29-May-2010
10:50:38 PM
JohnK !!! Well done matie! While the idea of going to Everest myself is not enticing (I hear it's cold there), it brought a massive smile to my face to hear you've done it. I know you've been working towards it for a good while now. Awesome work!!!!!!!!
climbingjac
30-May-2010
11:08:05 AM
On 28/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
>If you or I had the money, inclination and were lucky with
>the weather, we could do it, no doubt.

Speaking for myself, nope, I couldn't! It's really freaking cold there. Even if I wanted to go there - and I hear it is really beautiful, and the pride of completing it is insane - even if those things, I wouldn't have a hope in hell. Personally, I, and no doubt hoardes of others, would be stopped in our tracks with frostbite before we even hit base camp (or AMS, or a violent stomach bug or something). Then there'd be the matter of communicating with the support crew that may speak little or no of my language. Stressful in a comfortable situation. On Everest, another thing altogether. There'd be the matter of not knowing the people on your team very well, because your mates from home who you know and trust didn't want to go to Everest or could not stump up the cash. So you're going up against the highest peak on the planet, with people that may well leave you when you really need assistance. There is the matter of not being able to hold food down. There is the matter of there being insufficient oxygen and as such your brain wouldn't work properly and your body wouldn't move quickly enough. There is the matter of praying to god you don't get hurt because you are not familiar with the health care there. There is the matter of knowing that after all the preparation and parting with a giant wad of cash and annual leave time off work, you might not even get a sniff at the summit. It's not like you can just pop back next weekend and have another crack at it when you're feeling a bit fresher. There is the matter of the weather or the mountain itself doing nasty things that were not expected. There is the matter of dealing with a distressed family that cannot understand the sport itself, let alone why you would want to risk dying. Basically it is the matter of knowing there's a really good chance that once you step onto that mountain, you may not return. Shudder.

Nope. I personally couldn't get up that hill, and have no desire to. My idea of putting up with being uncomfortable is having to huddle under a tarp and drink warm tea while it drizzles in the campground. I'd probably get one of those odemas before I left the nearest township. Or someone would pinch my critical chocolate supply and that'd be the end of that. Kudos to people that can remain so mentally focussed for so long, and train their bodies to be in a sufficient condition to go there and have a shot at it.

I've seen John at work focussing on a goal. The man is an unstoppable force. He just keeps going until it's done. I can't imagine the effort he's put into this thing. All his mental and physically energy, and every resource available to him has no doubt gone into this. Well done matie! Bet it feels awesome to be able to sit back and think "Yep, now I know the answer to the question of 'I wonder if i could do it' ".
Wollemi
30-May-2010
2:17:18 PM
"(Andrew) Lock, 48, commenting on 13- year-old Jordan Romero's ascent of Everest, said the fact more people were trying to climb the world's highest summit did not diminish the scale of the achievement."

http://www.smh.com.au/world/terrible-face-of-everest-20100529-wmoz.html
One Day Hero
30-May-2010
3:37:44 PM
Confusion arises when people treat the summit as the summit. So many climbers are going up the fixed ropes without carrying anything, has it been forgotten that some folk have actually climbed the thing?........Mortimer, Mcartney Snape, Hall et al actually climbed everest, but apparently that's no different to being guided up the fixed lines.....a tick is a tick, the rest is details :(

Why not use a chopper? Looks like the technology is available.
dmnz
30-May-2010
7:43:59 PM
On 30/05/2010 Wollemi wrote:
>"(Andrew) Lock, 48, commenting on 13- year-old Jordan Romero's ascent of
>Everest, said the fact more people were trying to climb the world's highest
>summit did not diminish the scale of the achievement."
>
>http://www.smh.com.au/world/terrible-face-of-everest-20100529-wmoz.html

I actually like this bit:
''There is a difference between being fully guided and being a climber. That boy was reliant upon people who had a very high level of skills and experience.

''But it is still commendable. Anyone who thinks it's easy should go and try it.''
Duncan
30-May-2010
8:14:38 PM
On 30/05/2010 One Day Hero wrote:
>a tick is a tick, the rest is details
>:(

Yep, it's true ODH. This thread has established that the tick is all that matters. It's a clear consensus from the Chockstone community that we shouldn't question the means by which it was achieved. It's his dream, and he achieved it and that's all that matters. My dream is to kill puppies with a bandsaw. Don't question the validity of my dream, people.

Duncan
30-May-2010
8:23:56 PM
On 30/05/2010 dmnz wrote:
>I actually like this bit:
>''There is a difference between being fully guided and being a climber.
>That boy was reliant upon people who had a very high level of skills and
>experience.
>
>''But it is still commendable. Anyone who thinks it's easy should go and
>try it.''

Yeah, I saw that article and was wondering how long it would take to turn up on this thread. I'd bet he's talking about Joe Average, not climbers with a decent level of fitness.

wallwombat
30-May-2010
10:59:50 PM
On 30/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
> It's a clear consensus from the Chockstone community that
>we shouldn't question the means by which it was achieved. It's his dream,
>and he achieved it and that's all that matters. My dream is to kill puppies
>with a bandsaw. Don't question the validity of my dream, people.

I think the clear consensus was that this is a thread to congratulate another Chockstone member on a recent accomplishment and if you want to whine and bitch about the means by which it or similar ascents where achieved, then perhaps you should simply start up a different thread and whine and bitch on that one instead.
dmnz
31-May-2010
8:47:08 AM
On 30/05/2010 wallwombat wrote:
>On 30/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
>> It's a clear consensus from the Chockstone community that
>>we shouldn't question the means by which it was achieved. It's his dream,
>>and he achieved it and that's all that matters. My dream is to kill
>puppies
>>with a bandsaw. Don't question the validity of my dream, people.
>
>I think the clear consensus was that this is a thread to congratulate
>another Chockstone member on a recent accomplishment and if you want to
>whine and bitch about the means by which it or similar ascents where achieved,
>then perhaps you should simply start up a different thread and whine and
>bitch on that one instead.

you tell him WW
Duncan
31-May-2010
9:15:47 AM
Thread drift isn't exactly a rare occurence on here, now is it?
One Day Hero
31-May-2010
2:43:09 PM
On 31/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
>Thread drift isn't exactly a rare occurence on here, now is it?

Yeah, I figured we departed a while ago from the original purpose. I'm glad the aussie contingent got up and especially glad that they all got back down with their bits intact.
One Day Hero
31-May-2010
3:07:07 PM
On 30/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
> My dream is to kill puppies
>with a bandsaw. Don't question the validity of my dream, people.
>
Funny you should mention that, my dream is to establish the world record for the number of frozen marshmellows I can shove up my arse over a 2 week period.

It will be cold, uncomfortable, probably lonely, and very dangerous (strong risk of frostbite, and a 7% death rate for those who have attempted this record)...........beyond 8000marshmellows (the death zone), attaining enough oxygen is difficult. Rapid, shallow breathing is the norm!

This goal pushes aspirants to the very limits of human endurance, but it is my dream and I will follow through with all the tenacity I can muster......I just hope that all the knockers out there can allow me to do that, and through my journey, discover the courage to pursue dreams of their own
Duncan
31-May-2010
3:14:16 PM
Well look, if you do it without supplementary oxygen, I might be impressed.
One Day Hero
31-May-2010
3:18:18 PM
That is the plan.......I'm focusing my training on a little manouver known as the "hillary step" which gains access to the territory above 8500mm
dmnz
31-May-2010
7:18:30 PM
On 31/05/2010 One Day Hero wrote:
>That is the plan.......I'm focusing my training on a little manouver known
>as the "hillary step" which gains access to the territory above 8500mm

disturbing
simey
31-May-2010
7:46:35 PM
On 31/05/2010 One Day Hero wrote:
>Funny you should mention that, my dream is to establish the world record
>for the number of frozen marshmellows I can shove up my arse over a 2 week
>period.
>
>It will be cold, uncomfortable, probably lonely, and very dangerous (strong
>risk of frostbite, and a 7% death rate for those who have attempted this
>record)...........beyond 8000marshmellows (the death zone), attaining enough
>oxygen is difficult. Rapid, shallow breathing is the norm!
>
>This goal pushes aspirants to the very limits of human endurance, but
>it is my dream and I will follow through with all the tenacity I can muster......I
>just hope that all the knockers out there can allow me to do that, and
>through my journey, discover the courage to pursue dreams of their own

At least your dream shows some imagination. Although if I had to choose between pursuing your world record with marshmellows or paying the big dollars and joining the queue on Everest, I would probably choose Everest... although it would be a tough choice.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
31-May-2010
9:29:00 PM
On 30/05/2010 Duncan wrote:
>On 30/05/2010 dmnz wrote:
>>I actually like this bit:
>>''There is a difference between being fully guided and being a climber.
>>That boy was reliant upon people who had a very high level of skills
>and
>>experience.
>>
>>''But it is still commendable. Anyone who thinks it's easy should go
>and
>>try it.''
>
>Yeah, I saw that article and was wondering how long it would take to turn
>up on this thread. I'd bet he's talking about Joe Average, not climbers
>with a decent level of fitness.

I am no mountaineer, but in my limited experience I have found that altitude sickness is no respector of fitness, ... though for some fitness can help. It has a lot more to do with the bodies ability to get oxygen into the bloodstream. You can be supremely fit, but with a poor metabolic efficiency rate you can be completely shut down by altitude.
I agree with dmnz ...
>>>''But it is still commendable. Anyone who thinks it's easy should go and try it.''

Zebedee
1-Jun-2010
11:26:29 PM
On 31/05/2010 One Day Hero wrote:

> my dream is to establish the world record
>for the number of frozen marshmellows I can shove up my arse over a 2 week
>period.
>
>It will be cold, uncomfortable, probably lonely, and very dangerous (strong
>risk of frostbite, and a 7% death rate for those who have attempted this
>record)...........beyond 8000marshmellows (the death zone), attaining enough
>oxygen is difficult. Rapid, shallow breathing is the norm!
>
>This goal pushes aspirants to the very limits of human endurance, but
>it is my dream and I will follow through with all the tenacity I can muster......I
>just hope that all the knockers out there can allow me to do that, and
>through my journey, discover the courage to pursue dreams of their own
So will you be relying on fixed ropes? Are there Sherpas involved? Will it be a clean ascent?

wallwombat
1-Jun-2010
11:40:49 PM
On 1/06/2010 Zebedee wrote:
>Will it be a clean ascent?

Oh.....I don't think it will be a clean ascent.

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There are 70 messages in this topic.

 

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