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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 2 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60
Author
N008ie mistakes???

MrsM10iswhereitsat.
24/10/2008
4:38:43 PM
On 24/10/2008 rolsen1 wrote:
>but wear helmet if you want to, don't if you don't - but please don't
>preach about it here.

Do you like the colour beige Mr rolsen1?
Duncan
24/10/2008
4:40:07 PM
On 24/10/2008 Duncan wrote:
>I spent a few nights in hospital a few years back after some Euro asshat
>kicked some rocks off the top of Piddo. It was a glancing blow, but could
>easily have killed me if it had hit direct. My helmet was sitting a metre
>away (we'd just arrived).

Not of word of warning was given, and the f---er didn't try to help. Stuff happens that's beyond your control. That said, I don't wear a helmet at the Glen etc.
rolsen1
24/10/2008
4:41:13 PM
On 24/10/2008 MrsM10iswhereitsat. wrote:
>On 24/10/2008 rolsen1 wrote:
>>but wear helmet if you want to, don't if you don't - but please don't
>>preach about it here.
>
>Do you like the colour beige Mr rolsen1?

Sorry I can't sell

Phil S
24/10/2008
4:49:19 PM
>Duncan wrote:
>Achewood is the funniest cartoon on the interwebs.

Achewood IS funny. Friday afternoon is better now.

MrsM10iswhereitsat.
24/10/2008
4:49:36 PM
On 24/10/2008 Mr rolsen1 wrote:
>Sorry I can't sell

It is the colour of the ceiling in the Royal North Shore head injuy unit. I am told it gets a bit boring after a while of lying on your back and watching the shadows pass over it, but don't worry because I am not preaching to you Mr rolsen1.

tnd
24/10/2008
4:59:59 PM
On 24/10/2008 rolsen1 wrote:
>(snip) If you only go to the popular crags and you know what you're doing then
>you don't need one...

That has to take the cake for idiotic statement of the week (or longer).
rolsen1
24/10/2008
5:06:13 PM
On 24/10/2008 tnd wrote:
>On 24/10/2008 rolsen1 wrote:
>>(snip) If you only go to the popular crags and you know what you're doing
>then
>>you don't need one...
>
>That has to take the cake for idiotic statement of the week (or longer).

Good one.

Obviously you don't know how to place gear - if I was you i'd wear a helmet as well.

Thinking you're being safe just because you're wearing a helmet makes you an idiot.

shamus
24/10/2008
5:41:11 PM
Jeez, the poor bloke wanted some hints and suggestions to help him get into the sport, not a repeat of any of the many repetitive debates that come around on chockstone. DrDan - i'm sure you're able to make up your own mind on the helmet debate. Climb safe, climb with (preferably knowledgable) friends and enjoy yourself.

Sonic
25/10/2008
10:17:39 AM
To get back on track....... I think the most important thing here is to with someone who knows what they are doing and learn that way. Don't even think about roped soloing and don't go buying a ton of gear until you have tasted real rock. I have been out with enough noobs that are great in the gym, then either can't get their head around or don't enjoy real rock - like my brother. He is now my belay bitch. So you could soon waste a colossal amount of money on stuff you won't need or use......... and end up giving it to your older siblings!

Capt_mulch
25/10/2008
10:30:22 AM
>Thinking you're being safe just because you're wearing a helmet makes
>you an idiot.
Thinking you're safer because you wear a helmet doesn't!!

Climbing Accidents in Australia
What is of interest is that in 40.2% of rock climbing accidents the status of helmet wearing is known
and the results strongly suggest helmet wearers are less likely to die... There is also a larger
incidence of fractures and the like and fewer references to head injuries in cases where helmets were
worn


Climbing helmets are not an accessory

It's a bit like not wearing a seatbelt when driving a car - you don't need a seatbelt when you're not having an accident.

wallwombat
25/10/2008
4:36:35 PM
Hey Mulchy. Where was your helmet when you climbed that new route recently?


That's right. It was on the ground next to me, your diligent helmet-wearing belayer. Good thing I had mine on, considering the amount of crap you threw down from that ledge at the top of the route.

I was going to start another thread but I can't be arsed, so I'll ask the question here.

Do helmets have a life span?

Mine is 18 years old. It's never had a hard knock and I don't wear it very often but I have been considering getting a replacement if they have an expiry date.

I bought a BD Half Dome last year, wore it once, hated it and went back to my old Edelrid.

Capt_mulch
25/10/2008
7:24:41 PM
On 25/10/2008 wallwombat wrote:
>Hey Mulchy. Where was your helmet when you climbed that new route recently?
>
OK smartbutt, though:

1. It wasn't a Noo8ie mistake
2. It was a slab with no ledges
3. I seem to remember we graded it at 13 (though with a star!!), so I didn't feel pushed at my level of ability
4. Because it is the secret Crag X and no-one else was climbing it but the odd skink, there was minimal danger of someone dumping something on us from above
5. Next time I'm wearing my helmet all the way from Canberra 'cause I want to set a good example
6. I didn't wear my helmet when bouldering at Sandy Bay a couple of weeks ago because:
a) I did a complete ISO9003 risk assessment before climbing
b) I didn't need it and I'd look like a complete dork if Neil was there punching pics for the latest issue of Crux

As I said "as much as possible". I was wearing my helmet for my first go at "The British Beat" at Araps a little while ago, and Bomber recommended for my second attempt (top rope) that I ditched the helmet (saving weight??) - the risk was more than minimal, so I ditched the helmet and I ticked the climb. Climbing is all about acceptable risk.
DrDan
25/10/2008
7:47:59 PM
Hehe, thanks Shamus and Sonic for getting the topic back :P

No, seriously, Thanks HEAPS to everyone for their great snippets of advice.
I've definitely taken them on board already. I went and bought a set of Mammut quickdraws with the wiregate - they just feel so much easier and slicker to rope in.

I'm REALLY REALLY keen to head out with a few experienced climbers and se how they do things and learn from them. So I guess I'll have to start hanging around some climbing gyms to try and work my way in to their good books.

I've since given up the idea of soloing - it only came about because all my mates (we all got in to climbing together) all work during the week, leaving me with no one to go with, but you guys are right - I need to get a good network of peeps, of different interests and availability. I'll work at it. In fact, anyone in Sydney interested in taking a mature Skywalker along on their next outing? (apologies for the Star wars reference... wait - I'm not even a huge Star wars fan...). I learn quick and respond well to criticism! And I'm not the kind of guy that will take advantage of a situation (ie, I won't assume that going climbing with girls equals dates).

Yup, I forgot to mention that I have a belay device and figure of eight, but I think I'll leave the cams/wires/rocks until I get there and see how they're used in action. But being a noob, I WILL be looking out for a helmet, for sure!

Once again, thank you to each and every one of you with your great pearls of wisdom.
Very sincerely apprecaited.

Cheers!

Dan.

Capt_mulch
25/10/2008
8:39:51 PM
Oh no Dan, you don't get out of it that easily. The rest of us are having too much fun slinging stuff at each other :-) Climb safe bro.
DrDan
26/10/2008
12:46:51 AM
On 25/10/2008 Capt_mulch wrote:
>Oh no Dan, you don't get out of it that easily. The rest of us are having
>too much fun slinging stuff at each other :-) Climb safe bro.

Haha, I'd better make sure I have my helmet with me at all climbs at all times, then? :P
Thanks Capt_mulch

And I hope to eventually meet some of you out there and learn from the more experienced, and thank you in person.

Cheers,

Dan.

cookie
26/10/2008
9:09:53 AM
On 24/10/2008 Eduardo Slabofvic wrote:
>On 23/10/2008 Cookie
>
>Nothing is compulsory, you decide what it is your going to do and how
>your going to do it and then you
>accept the consequences of the decisions you've made. i think that about sums it up. i think i'll toodle on out and buy me a helmet, you never know when there is going to be an asshat around
Olbert
26/10/2008
10:51:30 AM
See...wearing a helmet while sport climbing climbing is like wearing a helmet while driving. If you have a crash you will almost certainly be better off...but when was the last time you saw someone driving a car wearing a helmet. These are crags where access to the top is very limited ie you would have to bash your way through dense scrub to get to it, and the top isnt littered with loose debris.

That said, any trad crags or dodgy sport crags where things are likely to get dropped on your head-I always wear my helmet.

At places like Nowra and Centenial Glen its rare to see someone with a helmet-no access to the top, but at places like Piddo, the Grose , Araps, Frog etc its rare to see someone not wearing one-as most climbs top out onto dodgy rock filled ledges.

Sabu
26/10/2008
10:57:29 AM
On 26/10/2008 Olbert wrote:
>See...wearing a helmet while sport climbing climbing is like wearing a
>helmet while driving. If you have a crash you will almost certainly be
>better off...but when was the last time you saw someone driving a car wearing
>a helmet.

I know of a doctor who makes his kids wear helmets in the car and i suspect it would
make a huge difference in the event of a crash.

Anyway regardless of rockfall there is also a risk of flipping backwards should your leg
be behind the rope, an easy thing to occur and that can result in hitting the rock with
your head.
kady
26/10/2008
11:07:54 AM
One thing that you should know about wire gates is that when used in conjunction with carrots/bolt plates they can rotate and pull the bolt plate off the carrot. Also be wary of carrots with smaller heads. I will never forget climbing past a bolt when my foot caught on my draw and lifted the draw (solid gate) and bolt plate right off a small headed carrot. p.s a carrot is like a regular bolt that has been bashed into a pre-drilled hole. ( i had no idea what a carrot was when i started climbing)
hero
26/10/2008
12:21:39 PM
Beige, Mrs M10, is also a colour that serves as a metaphor for the lives of those that live them scared of ending up in a cranial care unit.

And surely, not having a helmet during a serious accident means you have less chance of spending time stairing at the ceiling.

 Page 2 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60
There are 60 messages in this topic.

 

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