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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 3 of 12. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 120 | 121 to 140 | 141 to 160 | 161 to 180 | 181 to 200 | 201 to 220 | 221 to 240
Author
Register To Vote

billk
4/07/2007
3:47:44 PM
I think we need to talk about our obligations/ responsibilities as citizens, as well as our rights. Compulsory voting is arguably better understood as recognizing a universal obligation than trampling on anyone's rights.

Bob Saki
4/07/2007
4:08:02 PM
On 4/07/2007 BigMike wrote:
>On 4/07/2007 Bob Saki wrote:
>
>>"I Climb and I Vote" stickers
>>
>
>The concept of those stickers originated in the US, where only 50 per
>cent of the populace votes.
>
>They were designed to show that special-interest groups were committed
>to voting for change.
>
>But they don't apply here (someone needs to tell the ABC that!).
>
>"I climb and I vote?"
>
>Sure you do, everybody votes. Tell me something new.



ahh, think you've totally missed my point, which was meant to be facetious. I didn't need a diatribe on the history of such stickers which is self evident.

As for telling you something you don't know.......... well I'm sure you know everything :)


Fair point dalai re: the complusory voting, we only have to look at how the evangelical lobby got Bush up.

As to whom to vote for? a vexed question...........but I do fear the KRUDD


>

BigMike
4/07/2007
4:13:07 PM
On 4/07/2007 Bob Saki wrote:

>
>ahh, think you've totally missed my point, which was meant to be facetious.
>I didn't need a diatribe on the history of such stickers which is self
>evident.

Righto. If only it had been as self-evident to Aunty.


>
>As for telling you something you don't know.......... well I'm sure you
>know everything :)
>

Now you're catching on!
Bob Saki
4/07/2007
4:17:37 PM
glad to see your ego and sense of humour are still in tact ;)

as for Aunty like good Russian they head left and if in doubt they make 3 left turns and are back where they begun!
dalai
4/07/2007
4:19:23 PM
On 4/07/2007 Bob Saki wrote:
>As to whom to vote for? a vexed question...........but I do fear the KRUDD

How about "Raśl for Dictator" stickers?
Bob Saki
4/07/2007
4:24:12 PM
sadly all my favourite dictators have long since passed.

I always thought Idi Amin or Manuel Noriega would have been a great fit for Australia.

Perhaps Kim Jong Ill can be seconded...............
dalai
4/07/2007
4:29:04 PM
I just thought Raśl, because he may have got a taste for the job but is back to just being First Secretary of the Communist Party and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces...

IdratherbejamBing
4/07/2007
4:32:21 PM
On 4/07/2007 Bob Saki wrote:
>sadly all my favourite dictators have long since passed.
>
>I always thought Idi Amin or Manuel Noriega would have been a great fit
>for Australia.
>
>Perhaps Kim Jong Ill can be seconded...............

Dad's got an RDO from the meatworx, he's pissed on VBz , looks over me shoulder while I'm readin this one, then staggers to th door to go an by some PJz an some Drum for Travis, an then starts singin (if thats wot that beery-blur is !!!:D )

IDDY
IDDY
IDDY-AR-MIN!!!
MOST AMAZIN MAN THERE'S EVER BIN !!!

Say Wha !!!???!!!

AlanD
4/07/2007
9:30:05 PM
On 4/07/2007 BigMike wrote:
>On 3/07/2007 AlanD wrote:
>>The changes to the electorial role happened several years ago, I think
>>it was in well before the last Federal election.
>
>In fact, the new electoral laws were pushed through in December 2005,
>along with the disclosure threshold for donations to political parties
>being raised from $1500 to $10,000.
>
>So this will be the first election under the new ``close voter registration
>the day the election date is announced'' laws.
>
>>It's hard to claim that the government is trying to prevent people from
>>voting,
>
>As I said earlier, this will most affect young people (who don't tend
>to vote conservative) and people who rent (and who are less likely fall
>for a certain political line about ``keeping interest rates low for families'').

I stand corrected. It must have been being discussed on the lead up to the 2004 election.

From the AEC site

>Close of rolls
>When an election is announced, there are seven days from the issue of the writs for >people to ensure that they are correctly enrolled before the electoral roll is closed.

>During the 2004 federal election, a large number of Australians used the close of >rolls week either to enrol for the first time or to check their enrolment details and if >necessary to update these details. The AEC replied to almost 10,000 email enquiries >during this period.

>The AEC received a total of 423,975 enrolment cards in the week between the >announcement of the 2004 election and the close of rolls date. Of the enrolment >cards received in the last week, 78,816 were new enrolments.

>There were 13,021,230 people enrolled to vote at the close of rolls for the 2004 >federal election at 8pm, Tuesday 7 September. This figure included 17 year olds who >would turn 18 by 9 October 2004 and would therefore be entitled to vote. This close >of rolls figure compares with 12,636,631 electors who were enrolled at the close of >rolls for the 2001 federal election.

As for who it effects, it's affects those who ignore the current media campaign, it's not as though the government is making a secret about the need to enrol before the election is called. Further, I can understand why the AEC wants the rolls closed at the call of the election, 400 000 new or changed enrolments received in the 7 days after the call of the election and they need to process this number in under 5 weeks.

kieranl
5/07/2007
12:53:50 PM
On 4/07/2007 AlanD wrote:
>
>As for who it effects, it's affects those who ignore the current media
>campaign, it's not as though the government is making a secret about the
>need to enrol before the election is called. Further, I can understand
>why the AEC wants the rolls closed at the call of the election, 400 000
>new or changed enrolments received in the 7 days after the call of the
>election and they need to process this number in under 5 weeks.
>
Actually I understand that the AEC wanted to keep the the previous 7 day grace period - they actually like people enrolling and voting. It is basically the Federal Govt being cynical, wanting to exclude first-time voters (just turned 18) who hadn't got around to enrolling on the basis that those people are more likely to vote left or green.
Just another unheralded "reform" pushed through after people foolishly gave the liberals a majority in both houses (and I think it was an obscure Greens preference deal that was responsible for that).
john s
5/07/2007
12:57:56 PM
Right on most things there Kieran, but the preference deal was made by the ALP in Victoria. ALP votes eventually went to Family First over the greens, giving the conservatives the last senate seat .

John
kieranl
5/07/2007
8:38:55 PM
You're right about the Family First preference deal John but he doesn't count if the Libs/Nats hold together. I thought that there was a deal done in another state by the greens that strangely flipped back senate votes to the Govt and helped them get their majority in the Senate.
I won't swear to that but the reason I raised it is that people need to realise is that politics is about numbers and dealing. We are all different people (as you might have gathered from the various opinions expressed on Chockstone) and no political party is going to represent everything you stand for (even the Monster Raving Loony Party and it's sadly deceased leader Screaming Lord Such).
To expect everyone you vote for to be as pure as the driven snow is rubbish. To make your vote count you have to enroll and then think about how you vote. I rarely, if ever vote according to a "How-to_vote" card from any party, especially in the Senate. Not voting, or following party guidelines just empowers the party hacks.
So, Enroll, Think, Vote.
wyt91t
6/07/2007
3:05:02 PM
voting is the biggest pain in the ass in the world and the only reason i do vote is because if i dont i get fined.f--- the government and there dumb ass rules and laws and taxes
regards christian lopez

BigMike
7/07/2007
9:32:04 AM
On 6/07/2007 wyt91t wrote:
>voting is the biggest pain in the ass in the world and the only reason
>i do vote is because if i dont i get fined.f--- the government and there
>dumb ass rules and laws and taxes
>regards christian lopez

Wow, if half an hour's effort every year on average is the biggest pain in your world, I want your life mate!!!


wyt91t
7/07/2007
11:19:47 AM
if it just was half an hour it wouldnt bother me but it takes about 2hours and a half just to grab a piece of paper and scrunch and throw it in those stupid boxes
dalai
7/07/2007
1:36:31 PM
On 7/07/2007 wyt91t wrote:
>if it just was half an hour it wouldnt bother me but it takes about 2hours
>and a half just to grab a piece of paper and scrunch and throw it in those
>stupid boxes

2 hours!!?? Do you stop and chat for 45 minutes with each party helper handing out the how to vote cards by the front entrance about the pros and cons of their prospective policys and outlook for the next four years ??

At worse it's 15 minutes including walking to the local school to vote. And thats also selecting all the people on the sheets individually...

M10iswhereitsat.
7/07/2007
6:38:16 PM
15 minutes !!??
Dude, u need to discover donkey-voting !!!

:P

Who fkn cares !!! Johnnyz gunna win:-)
john s
9/07/2007
9:49:08 AM
On 5/07/2007 kieranl wrote:

I thought that there was a deal done
>in another state by the greens that strangely flipped back senate votes
>to the Govt and helped them get their majority in the Senate.

I checked over the weekend - the Greens had the ALP ahead of the coalition on all their senate tickets. It was just that old Barnaby Joyce got enough votes to get him a fourth seat for the coalition in QLD.
But you are right - it is worth putting all the numbers in yourself!
John
dalai
9/07/2007
9:55:37 AM
On 7/07/2007 M10iswhereitsat. wrote:
>15 minutes !!??
>Dude, u need to discover donkey-voting !!!
>
>:P

That includes the five minutes walk each way and queuing at the door... ;-)
kieranl
9/07/2007
12:35:48 PM
John, I might have got it back the front - It may have been the ALP in Qld who preferenced nationals ahead of Greens out of local spite.

 Page 3 of 12. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 120 | 121 to 140 | 141 to 160 | 161 to 180 | 181 to 200 | 201 to 220 | 221 to 240
There are 240 messages in this topic.

 

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