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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 1 of 6. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 106
Author
off-topic: climbers who ride bicycles

tmarsh
30/08/2005
10:31:48 AM
Just curious about other climbers who are out there who are keen cyclists as well. I would imagine there is a big cross-over into the mountain biking community, but what about other areas? Dalai, I know, is into triathalons. What about road or track, people?

I raced road for a few seasons before realising that it was a very inefficient way to spend my time. Endurance sports suck like that. Or maybe I just suck at endurance sports.

Still ride every day though, mainly on this fixed gear commuter.

Anyone else care to contribute?

Rich
30/08/2005
10:42:19 AM
i ride downhill and XC sometimes when not climbing..
why don't you start a poll?

sticky
30/08/2005
11:16:40 AM
Tim

That fixie is a thing of beauty. You should be very proud! I don't have the cojones to ride fixed gear in Melbourne traffic, but hats off !

Kyle

edit: I do ride as much as I can - Wilier roadie is my pride and joy, I have a steel Kona Explosif hardtail that is stuck in Canada, hmm, that should be arriving any month now!

Neil
Online Now
30/08/2005
2:39:43 PM
i'm fairly into XC.
i have 2 cannondale hardtails - got to have your toys :)
Fish Boy
30/08/2005
5:30:15 PM
I ride a 15 pound fully rigid single speed MTB.
Heaps of enduro racing and a bit of dirt crit stuff.....
Riding is fun.

climbau
30/08/2005
5:53:54 PM
I used to do a lot of MTBing when I was living in Sydney. Was also climbing everyday and found that it complemented my climbing by increasing my fitness and also for sighting holds and sequence planning. My theory is that you are thinking a lot faster when MTB riding and as you get used to that you can make faster decisions whilst climbing. Could just be a load of cods wallop also :))
Did a little bit of road riding but got worried about getting huge legs, which I was told was bad for climbing ????

Both my bikes are cheap as, Roady = 18y.o Repco steel 12 speed
MTB = upgraded to Learsport L3000 (or something like that) from a "Wild Stallion".

dan
30/08/2005
6:27:50 PM
I was big on endure mountain biking when I was fit and in QLD. But it just seems all too much effort now. My dual shock giant is a bit of a cow to ride to work, but it carries good memories :).
James
30/08/2005
9:05:05 PM
ja, 'twas a regular thing to do 4 or 5 laps at Mt cootha in Brisbane (wed night & the weekends). but that
was back when/where the climbing was only 1hr drive away. climbing takes preference now
(which=8hrs driving each weekend), so I only commute round the 'burbs now.

tmarsh - do you ride round the city with a chrome skate-style helmet? your rig looks familiar.

nmonteith
30/08/2005
11:05:54 PM
On 30/08/2005 James wrote:
>ja, 'twas a regular thing to do 4 or 5 laps at Mt cootha in Brisbane (wed
>night & the weekends). but that
>was back when/where the climbing was only 1hr drive away. climbing takes
>preference now
>(which=8hrs driving each weekend)

Ditto James. I sold my bikes after a year in here because there was no Mt Cootha equivalent in
Melbourne.
Dave C
30/08/2005
11:32:50 PM
I used to race road bikes in my teens but stopped when I got into climbing (although I still rode a fair bit for fitness.) When I first came over here I kept up the road miles (Britain is a great country for road riding btw) until me and the bike were totalled by a large truck in 1994. Only started riding again about 2 years ago and bought a 1997 Peugeot 16-speed that will be returning to Oz with me in December (hopefully.)

Megan
31/08/2005
12:31:09 AM
I've got a road bike and a mountain bike, but most of my riding is just to get around - the idea of a fixie is becoming tempting though...

adski
31/08/2005
1:41:52 AM
On 30/08/2005 tmarsh wrote:
>I raced road for a few seasons before realising that it was a very inefficient
>way to spend my time. Endurance sports suck like that.

That's a real pragmatic view and I kind of agree. I think I'm getting more fast twitch these days as my race number is still attached from the last endurance race, due to lack of (mtb) training. Not a problem but perhaps an indicator that I should sell the mtb to pay for climbing petrol.

At the enduro mtb events in NSW there's plenty of climbers, and I think they cross over well except for the muscle mass in the legs thing. Although every time I press out a one legged rockover on a slab I thank the lucky stars for my cycling background.

As I thought about mentioning on the "Rich climbs so much his tips wear off" post, kayaking has got to be the worst crossover sport for climbers. Turns those callouses we work so hard to develop into pliant pudge.
Goodvibes
31/08/2005
7:27:17 AM
What are you doing climbing slabs adski??

cheesehead
31/08/2005
7:29:27 AM
>an indicator that I should sell the mtb to pay for climbing petrol.
Not heard it put that way before.

>off" post, kayaking has got to be the worst crossover sport for climbers.
>Turns those callouses we work so hard to develop into pliant pudge.
Second only to dishwashing.

Megs, be cautious of the naughty fixy! They're so nasty. Singlespeed is ace, but fixed is a whole 'nother box of irate rattlesnakes.
I think I've seen your rig around too, Tmarsh. Where do you tend to ride it?

brat
31/08/2005
7:54:39 AM
Go bush, bloody freeway fairies! :o)

I've got a Cannondale Fatty MTB and a older GT MTB, do adventure racing when not recovering from injuries! :o)

Adventure racing is great fun, try it!

I also kayak (long distance races, when not recovering from injuries), good for core strength, aerobic capacity and one of the few sports where you can keep fit sitting on your arse, not sure if it helps my climbing?

tmarsh
31/08/2005
8:02:22 AM
On 31/08/2005 cheesehead wrote:
>Megs, be cautious of the naughty fixy! They're so nasty. Singlespeed is
>ace, but fixed is a whole 'nother box is irate rattlesnakes.
>I think I've seen your rig around too, Tmarsh. Where do you tend to ride
>it?

I commute to the city on it, and you might see me anywhere in suburbs from Footscray to Northcote on it. Of course you might have me confused with someone else, but I would have to concede that the bike is kinda distinctive!

I've got a few singlespeeds and fixies now, but the orange one gets the most attention. Weirdly enough, fixed is a bit slower than singlespeed, largely on downhills. Brakeless fixed is the slowest of all. It's a lot like soloing - you only want to ride at a speed that you know you can pull up from. Sort of like only climbing grades you know that you won't fall on.

The fixed scene in Melbourne is small but everyone is really friendly. You'll always get a wave or a nod from other riders, particularly some of the couriers.

Megan - if you are keen to set up a fixed, PM me and let me know. You can do it on the cheap, and with an existing road frame without too much bother. I've done about 6 conversions now, some of which required brazing horizontal dropouts into the frame, but most of which were pretty straightforward. Of course, getting a track bike is probably the easiest option...

IdratherbeclimbingM9
Online Now
31/08/2005
8:32:51 AM
What's the difference between fixed and single speed?
Just a different gear ratio (fixed) or is there more to it?

BTW I have an old style mountain bike & don't ride it much, but enjoy the times that I do.
climberman
31/08/2005
8:42:29 AM
Tim - that is a rig of beauty. Sheesh.
rightarmbad
31/08/2005
9:02:43 AM
On 31/08/2005 M8iswhereitsat wrote:
>What's the difference between fixed and single speed?
>Just a different gear ratio (fixed) or is there more to it?
>
>BTW I have an old style mountain bike & don't ride it much, but enjoy
>the times that I do.

A fixed rear wheel cannot coast, you have to keep pedaling. Very hard to ride when you are not used to it. Quite easy to to throw your feet clean of the pedals if you are not strapped in. Dangerous in traffic really. It's used on the track where riders ride are in very close quarters, because it stops a rider from making sudden speed changes which could be potentially dangerous. Also a lot stronger than a ratchet system and can handle the 1 kilowatt plus output of a good track rider.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
Online Now
31/08/2005
9:09:00 AM
Thanks leftie* I am now better educated due your response.

... (*due rightarmbad)
:)

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There are 106 messages in this topic.

 

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