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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 9 of 23. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 60 | 61 to 80 | 81 to 100 | 101 to 120 | 121 to 140 | 141 to 160 | 161 to 180 | 181 to 200 | 201 to 220 | 221 to 240 | 241 to 260 | 261 to 280 | 281 to 300 | 301 to 320 | 321 to 340 | 341 to 360 | 361 to 380 | 381 to 400 | 401 to 420 | 421 to 440 | 441 to 452
Author
Burnley: On Coxys Big Break Ch7 5.30pm this Sunday
dalai
2/03/2006
9:16:39 AM
On 1/03/2006 Richard wrote:
>Actualy, I was thinking more about the original burnley wall, which would
>not have been protected by anti garafiti paint .. was there much graffiti
>there? My memory says not, but I didn't go there a lot..(couldn't get past
>the cow pat...)

The Burnley traverse was mostly graffiti free with tagging and graffiti mainly just on the vertical pillars and on the right (4th panel) and end arch. After one particularly bad batch of graffiti, the 4th panel and the arch were painted over with the anti graffiti paint. Though unlike the MacRoberston road bridge traverse where they painted over everything including the holds, at Burnley they kindly painted around the holds.

A few pictures of the original Burnley wall are still posted here.

nmonteith
2/03/2006
9:21:58 AM
On 2/03/2006 dalai wrote:
>A few pictures of the original Burnley wall are still posted here.

Those were the days... when KP was just a wee lad.
climbingjac
2/03/2006
11:08:57 AM
Dear climbing community,

Work has continued during the week to prepare the steel framework of the 45 degree wall for the carpentry team to put the wooden panels up this weekend. In other words, people have been hard at work drilling holes through the steel ready for the coach bolts that will connect the wood. Such ground work allows us to miraculously slap a whole wall worth of wood up in a day on the weekend. Steve Ford has also been tinkering away at finishing touches on the 30 degree wall, and I've been working with local resident Ron Handley, installing a basic drainage system to divert water that runs from the underside of the freeway and onto our 45 degree wall in heavy rain. As this would be very annoying going forward, we have dealt with it in advance (special thanks to Ron for some of his excellent ideas that contributed to the solution of this problem!)

There is no money to pay for a graffiti artist, and to be honest with you, it is not a path I plan to follow (for many reasons). Years ago the climbing community was canvassed (partly on this very thread) for ideas on what we hoped to build. Ideas, pros and cons were thrown around, and the concept of graffiti art was disregarded. Partly because when you graffiti art a wall, you can't distinguish the holds from the mess of paint! This would not be such a great training facility in that scenario.

In terms of the graffiti art debate, we have no money left to adapt this thing any further, I'm sorry. The Project is grateful to the team members who have at times put their hands in their own pockets to buy incidental things we've needed along the way. Eddie Rawlins in particular has pitched in more than his fair share of cutting disks and drill bits, and his angle grinder died as a result of overuse on the project. Tim Le's drill got sacrificed to the Project also.

At some stage, someone had to be "Johnny on the spot" to collate all the ideas, have them discussed amongst the Project Team, and assemble a plan and budget accordingly. I happened to be that person, and I look forward to the day that I can hand over a training facility to Melbourne that will be free use to all. While I feel sure that the efforts of myself and my team may well be rewarded with the occasional complaint about "why couldn't we have this" and so on, I hope that overall, people will be thrilled to bits at having been handed a free climbing facility on a silver platter. That's the key – it's free. I will say it again in the future at the relevant point in time, but a massive thankyou to the major sponsor of the Project, Transurban, manager of CityLink, and also to the heavy support of Parks Victoria. Thanks also to the people that have worked on the project team thus far – and also to those that have played a role in being my advisors on technical issues.

For your convenience, I have listed below the individuals who have helped make The Burnley Bouldering Walls a reality for you thus far. Perhaps if you see one of these people at the crag or in the gym, you could take a brief moment to thank them for their efforts.

Thanks everyone!

Jac

List of helpers so far (please - if I have left anyone out - let me know!!)

AGUDO, Alyosha
BARRACK, Richard
BARTLEY, Joel
BATEY, David
BENNETT-DALY, Reuben
BRAND, Matt
BRAND, Roger
BRECK, Aaron
BROTHERTON, Tony
CALLUS, Greg
COFFEY, Craig
COLLESS, Leigh
CORNISH, Helen
COULSON, Damien
DALY-MAIR, Belinda
DEMMERT, Adam
DICKER, Katherine
DIXON, Mathew
DU, Trang
DU, Trinh
ELLEMOR, Andrew
FLETCHER, Jamie
FORD, Stephen
GARAGARZA, Igoitz
GODING, Josef
GOWERS, Anita
GRUSSLER, Reinhard
HAIG, Francesca
HANDLEY, Ronald
HARRINGTON, Matt
HEALEY, Gerard
HEANEY, Darren
HIPWELL, Dallas
HOANG, Ti
HOEL, Adrian
HOLBECK, Megan
IOCANO, Louisa
JACKSON, Marcel
KASSAY, James
KASSAY, Tibor
KNIGHT, Justin
LAMA, Martin
LE, Tim
LEGGETT, David
LITTLE, Geoff
LUNN, Tim
MACKLIN, Heidi
MALLIAROS, George
MARSH, Tim
MCDONALD, Richard
MCKELVIE, David
MCKEON, Ken
MCKINNON, Nick
MENG, Stephan
METZKE, Robert
MIDDLETON, Alan
MIDDLETON, Helen
MIDDLETON, Jacqui
MIDDLETON, John
MONKS, Will
MONTEITH, Neil
MOORE, Daniel
MORGAN-PAYLER, Joe
MURRAY, Heather
PFRUNDER, James
PRESTON, Nigel
RAWLINS, Eddie
RITMAN, David
ROBERTSON, Alister
RUSSELL, David
SCHMIDT, Jono
SHARMA, Anita
SIMKIN, Jacob
SIRONIC, Adrian
SMITH, Steven
SPAIN, James
STEPHENSON, Luke
STONE, John
SWINSON, William
TANKEY, Mathew
TOAN, Chris
TOMKINS, Mike
TYNAN, Terry
VINCENT, Clarke
WALL, Trevor
WALTON, Rosemary
WARNES, Justin
WHIGHT, Tania
WILSON, Stephanie
WRIGHT, Ben
YANG, Afra

kieranl
2/03/2006
7:42:43 PM
Thanks heaps guys. Amazing work. Pity I won't get to sample it very often.
gfdonc
2/03/2006
9:42:25 PM
Don't be sad. I believe you're adequately catered for by some bouldering in the forest park, just 7km from Nati. Its the one with the big cliffs in the back. ;-)

kieranl
2/03/2006
9:49:29 PM
But I have to get there in peak-hour traffic!

ShinToe Warrior
3/03/2006
12:38:20 AM
On 2/03/2006 kieranl wrote:
>But I have to get there in peak-hour traffic!
I'll swap you your peak hour traffic for mine.
climbingjac
3/03/2006
1:40:13 PM
Good afternoon all,

Please note that we plan to put the wooden panels on the 45 degree wall tomorrow (Saturday 4th March).

Please feel free to wander by and take a look at the action - being careful not to disrupt people that are working at the time.

Cheers!

Jac
M
6/03/2006
6:07:44 PM
Hi Jac,

Now that the wall is nearing completion I was wondering what the plans were for routesetting.
Are you thinking of problems or just lots of holds and choose your own adventure?

mat


BenHev
7/03/2006
1:18:30 AM
Wood is up on the 45 degree wall. Another excellent working bee on Saturday.

Making holes for the holds on the 30 degree wall...

Jac and Heather measuring up


Jacqui creating the grid


Ben
climbingjac
7/03/2006
8:35:21 AM
On 6/03/2006 matd wrote:
>Hi Jac,
>
>Now that the wall is nearing completion I was wondering what the plans
>were for routesetting.
> Are you thinking of problems or just lots of holds and choose your own
>adventure?
>
>mat
>

We will have routes, yes. Three routes per wall, at least... and then we'll fill the gaps as best we can with random holds so people can "choose their own adventure".

Currently my loungeroom has climbing holds absolutely everywhere :-) That said, we have a limited budget for holds, and there'll be in the order of 2000 teenuts to fill up! Anyone wishing to contribute holds or cash for the project can contact me directly. If you would like to purchase a small collection of holds to generate an "up" problem, or short boulder problem, you can do so. I already had someone ask if they were allowed to do that. Of course! Simply contact one of the companies listed below, tell them the wall you wish to set on (30 degree or 45 degree), the approximate grade you want your problem to be, and how many moves you want to have in it. Anyone interested in doing this should perhaps consider purchasing unusual colours such as orange or swirly colours, so as not to clash with the main routes (contact me via PM if you need to clarify). So its easy - simply purchase a small kit of holds, and we'll have a routesetter set the problem for you!!

*** Hold manufacturers below are listed in alphabetical order, not order of preference ***

http://www.infiniteholds.com
http://www.mingygoat.com.au
http://www.v12.com.au
http://www.woodieworx.com

Best wishes,

Jac
>

Phil Box
7/03/2006
8:51:57 AM
Just a note to anyone that is considering using this thread as a model for their own wall construction project. Before I make my comment it should be noted that I do understand that this particular wall has its own unique construction problems so please do not take this as criticism for your efforts at solving those problems, I understand that the frame was of a rather dynamic nature inasmuch as the reinforcing within the concrete dictated where the structural elements went. That said, for anyone else wanting to drill T nut holes, don't drill the holes in place. Develop your grid and drill the holes and place the T nuts when the ply is on the ground. You can drill multiple sheets with a long drill bit and using a lump hammer you can whack the T nuts in with one blow. Two people working together can make this a very short job. Doing it in place would be evil but as I said with this construction project it seems that there was no alternative.

I still reckon it is great to see all of these people coming together to undertake this community project, very well done, I am singularly impressed. The fact that I am two states away prevented me from participating. I would have loved to have been part of this project. I love building woodies.
climbingjac
7/03/2006
9:00:21 AM
Good advice to people constructing a home woodie, Phil.

Obviously not possible at this site for a number of reasons. The big one is theft. Once we started putting wood up on this wall, we had to finish it same day and lock it up such that nooone could access the (bolt) nuts at the rear and take all our wood home with them. We could not teenut and construct the wall all in one day. In our case, it was far easier teenutting after the fact.

Cheers
jac

nmonteith
7/03/2006
9:10:59 AM
So who ARE the route-setters?

Phil Box
7/03/2006
12:51:26 PM
Totally understand Jac, hence my disclaimer, I certainly did not want to be upsetting people after the fact. You guys rock with the work that you've put in and the last thing you need is people who weren't there second guessing why you did things a certain way.
climbingjac
7/03/2006
1:53:15 PM
No offence taken Phil - lots of people suggested to me to do the teenut grid before putting up the panels, but considering the project as a whole and the environment it resides in, it just wasn't possible. No problemo, we deal with it in the required fashion...
climbingjac
7/03/2006
2:24:39 PM
Hi everyone,

Please find following pictures from Saturday's working bee!

Cheers,

Jac

7.30am. Matt Brand joins the project, and drills holes through the steel at lightening speed, to make way for the bolts that attach the wood to the steel.


Mathew Dixon works overhead on hole drilling also




Leigh Colless – always smiling.


Go go go! From left: Matt Brand, Mathew Dixon and Leigh Colless working overhead on drilling holes. Steve Ford works below readying himself for the woodwork.


Jacob Simkin is ground assist crew, while Ben Wright gets into position atop the 30 degree wall to put in the final bolts.


VCC committee member Ben Wright puts his rope skills to use, and gets down to business with adding extra bolts to the upper section of the 30 degree wall.






Marcel Jackson is one of the pioneers of the project. He was on the team of five people that went into bat for the climbing community, and was present for the very first meetings with Transurban about climbing at Burnley. Here, Marcel returns for service, enjoying seeing the project progressing.




Jamie Fletcher, member of the Nail Removal project team of 2005, turns up again to help. Jamie is doing some work "behind the scenes" of the 30 degree wall, locking the thing down with more bolts.




Marcel Jackson heads behind the wall to deal with the matter of tightening bolt nuts in the roof.




climbingjac
7/03/2006
2:25:18 PM
Jacob Simkin works on constructing a safety line for the team to attach to.


The famous water diversion solution! During heavy rain last week, we noticed that water leaking from the roof was able to run down the aręte and pool at the bottom of the 45 degree wall. Not good! Accordingly, I consulted a plumber about the issue, and myself, Ron Handley and Steve Ford all contributed to producing a solution that diverts the water back round the corner so it can splash into the river.


Bolts, bolts and more bolts! Thank very much to Mullings Fasteners in Campbellfield for their ongoing support with providing us with ridiculously fantastic discounts on our coach bolts.


And so it begins… Steve Ford and Matt Brand working on the wood for the 45 degree wall.




Putting up the panels involves lots of people, but not at all times. In between bursts of activity, there are moments where you can sit and enjoy the scene. Alyosha Agudo (aka "Aly") takes a seat on the jerry can.


Chris Toan pays me a visit at the worksite to make a donation towards climbing holds for the project. Thankyou Chris!!!


Aly gets down to business on the 45 degree wall.


Tim Lunn on the 45 degree wall.


Aly gives the task his full attention.


Igoitz Garagarza and Aly hard at work on the 45 degree wall.


Matt Brand, Igoitz Garagarza, Steve Ford and Aly working well together to get the second row of wood moving.








The workbench.




Jacob, Aly and Matt.


Happy chappies - Jacob, Tim and Aly.
climbingjac
7/03/2006
2:26:01 PM
Matt Brand and Jacob Simkin. The 45 degree wall.


Go Jacob go!






Jacob, Aly and Tim.


Aly and Tim.


Aly.


Life goes on outside the Burnley Project – as per every other weekend day, Parks Victoria staff are up early and out on the water.






The last of the panels go onto the climbing face of the 45 degree wall.






So much serenity – one of the many rowing boats cruise by.
climbingjac
7/03/2006
2:26:35 PM
Matt and Steve make plans for the installation of the panels on the upper tier of the 45 wall.




Tim Lunn behind the scenes of the 45 degree wall.


OK boys, let's go! Lunch is over, and the boys club work on the upper section of the 45 wall. Wait a minute – they've let a girl join in! Tania joins the party (foreground).






Capturing important moments – Jacob Simkin.


Jacqui Middleton (me) planning out the teenut grid on the 30 degree wall.


Heather Murray, myself, Rosemary Walton at Tim Le working on the teenut grid. Hey Tim, I thought you said you didn't want to come back till this thing was climbable!!! In the background, my parents have popped in for a visit. My mum, Helen Middleton is pictured.


Rosemary and myself using the teenut jig to drill our way to glory. My mum and Tim Le watch on.


Chicks with power tools…. Rosemary Walton takes control of the drill.


Marcel, Aly and Tim Lunn


More bolts please! This box is empty! Aly waits for Steve to issue a fresh box of bolts.


The grid takes shape. The 30 degree wall.


You turn your back for five seconds, and look what happens… the panels of the 45 degree wall near completion.

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