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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 1 of 3. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 40 | 41 to 53
Author
Climbing Training

bigchris
10/02/2012
1:22:55 AM
Hey guys,

I realise that is a pretty vague question as there are many different styles of climbing, but what do you guys and girls do to train? Strength and endurance-wise? Any gym-goers (fitness gyms, not climbing gyms)? If so what do you do there (or where ever you go)?


pmonks
10/02/2012
5:02:51 AM
Buy a hangboard, and then use it regularly but sparingly (no more than twice a week, at least to begin with). This Metolius guide is a reasonable place to start - you'd be amazed what 10 minutes twice a week can do!

I've also been seeing a trainer at a weights gym in recent months, but for me that's mostly focused on building up strength in muscle groups that aren't used in climbing, to help avoid injuries (at my age injuries just don't heal like they used to...).

Oh and it goes without saying that you should be climbing as much as possible (ideally outdoors) - that's the single best way to get better.

benjenga
10/02/2012
6:52:39 AM
On 10/02/2012 pmonks wrote:
>Oh and it goes without saying that you should be climbing as much as possible
>(ideally outdoors) - that's the single best way to get better.

Agreed, the more really rock time you can get the better all rounded climber you will become. Most climbing gyms have training programs at that that you could join.

Robb
10/02/2012
9:48:07 AM
apart from getttting on rock as much as you can, hang boarding for the fingers in moderation and Crossfit for all over fitness and strength.
bones
10/02/2012
11:12:48 AM
On 10/02/2012 benjenga wrote:
>Most climbing gyms have training programs at that that
>you could join.

I haven't noticed any of these in Melbourne gyms... what do they do?
hipdos
10/02/2012
12:04:40 PM
Hangboard is great for finger strength and some muscle mass in the forearms, but for the strength side you should also be bouldering at the climbing gym. It's the least boring way to get power and finger strength. Then get into some campusing once you are strong enough. Do some endurance work but you will get a substantial amount of endurance through your strength work, particularly if you are doing a lot of it.

The fitness gym is of limited value, although no harm if that's what you like to do. Good for general fitness and keeping antagonist muscles in shape but way less value than the climbing gym.

My completely unscientific 2c.

sliamese
10/02/2012
12:41:54 PM
opening your mind to the possibilities is also key. rock climbing is 90% mental IMO.

i put some words about that down on paper(screen??) just now over here. theres also a dave graham interview thats pretty sweet!
One Day Hero
10/02/2012
12:45:45 PM
Yeah, Hipdos is offering excellent advice...........if you spend your weekends dogging grade 28 sport routes! If you aren't doing that on w/e's, his training program is probably stupid.

What routes are you climbing currently? Run us through your last climbing trip, blow by blow. How often do you touch rock? What do you feel is holding you back? What's causing you to fall off routes? Do you fall off routes? What aspect of your climbing do you think is shit compared to those you climb with? What routes would you like to climb? (this weekend? this autumn? this year? next year?) How long have you been climbing? How much of your life are you prepared to waste in pursuit of increased climbing performance?

Answer those questions, then maybe someone can give you some half sensible advice on how to train
One Day Hero
10/02/2012
1:14:56 PM
On 10/02/2012 sliamese wrote:
>opening your mind to the possibilities is also key. rock climbing is 90%
>mental IMO.
>
>i put some words about that down on paper(screen??) just now over here.

Hi Simon, I like reading about your inner journey, its amazing how much of what you write is so similar to how I thought about climbing during obsessive phases in my 20's.

I know what you're trying to get at with the whole 'flow state' idea. When everything clicks into place and you don't have to think about it........its a beautiful and powerful and addictive thing.......and fleeting! The problem is that you can only get to that state by climbing all the fukin' time, I've never had it going whilst living in the city, holding down a job and a relationship, and climbing on w/e's.

So, for 90% of people who climb from the city, spraying about how you should climb without thinking is just plain wrong. It won't work for most people unless they can go on a 3 month trip and get enough mileage under their belt to be able to operate in that sub-conscious way. Its as irrelevent as the clowns advising gr18 climbers to get into campussing.
hipdos
10/02/2012
1:21:16 PM
On 10/02/2012 One Day Hero wrote:
>Yeah, Hipdos is offering excellent advice

Thanks! My point is, no matter what sort of climbing you do, finger strength and power will help. If you spend 10 minutes struggling through a crux that saps you for the rest of the day.

Of course lots of people don't enjoy training strength, stick to laps of the vertical walls if that floats your boat. But not everyone has nervous fits when they read the word bouldering ODH!
One Day Hero
10/02/2012
1:29:12 PM
Seriously mate, I've been there, I've trained like you're training, I've seen lots and lots of climbers come and go........nearly 20yrs now, holy shit :/

If this dude is fairly new and climbing in the mid teens (as I suspect he is), your advice is probably so wrong its almost criminal! Why not wait and see how he answers my questionaire, before you apply your 'one size fits all' training program?

ajfclark
10/02/2012
1:33:11 PM
His profile says he's 28...

davidn
10/02/2012
1:39:33 PM
On 10/02/2012 hipdos wrote:
>Thanks! My point is, no matter what sort of climbing you do, finger strength
>and power will help. If you spend 10 minutes struggling through a crux
>that saps you for the rest of the day.
>
>Of course lots of people don't enjoy training strength, stick to laps
>of the vertical walls if that floats your boat. But not everyone has nervous
>fits when they read the word bouldering ODH!

Campusing is not bouldering. What kind of grades do you boulder?

bigchris
10/02/2012
1:42:51 PM
What routes are you climbing currently?
Not sure what you mean by this - either way though, gym 14-18 depending on the wall, and have been out to the araps and cathedral ranges.

Run us through your last climbing trip, blow by blow.

My last climbing trip was with pat at the cathedral ranges - north jawbone - Speigels Overhang i think it was called - 3 pitches 10,10 and 14 and an abseil. The two 10's were easy, the 14 was easy once I got passed the bit that had no holds (pat jetted up pretty quick though lol).

How often do you touch rock?

Not often, probably once a month.

What do you feel is holding you back?

Not exactly knowing what im doing, even though most of climbing is common sense. I feel like a bit of a bum having to borrow peoples gear and go out with them climbing, but thats how everyone gets into climbing im told. Strength just to hold on is my other issue. Im pretty strong, but not in my fingers or forearms lol

What's causing you to fall off routes?

Not being able to pull myself up, or hold on for ages, especially on stuff that is overhung.

Do you fall off routes?

I've only really had one slight spill, more of a cheesegrater, but for the most part, i havent really fallen (mentally i dont let myself lol). But in the gym, just for training I jump and try and do rediculous moves to see if i can stick them - im not too stressed about falling there.

What aspect of your climbing do you think is shit compared to those you climb with?

Mainly just my lack of strength and technique, i get frustrated when other people can do stuff that I can't.

What routes would you like to climb? (this weekend? this autumn? this year? next year?)

I really love Araps, that has been my favorite so far, but I need someone who is my level that knows what they are doing to go climbing there with me, so they're not feeling like they are frustrated lagging my arse around all day.

How long have you been climbing? 8 months-ish

How much of your life are you prepared to waste in pursuit of increased climbing performance?

Not bothered at all by this lol - I just would like to climb mid 20's and be decent.

Hope that helps you answer my q's!!!

ajfclark
10/02/2012
1:51:10 PM
I'd guess more time on rock couldn't hurt. On that front, the VCC has a trip to Arapiles coming up in a few weeks. Hit them up: http://www.vicclimb.org.au/index.php?location=events#238

If you've got shoes, harness and a helmet you should be golden on the gear front. If you don't have a helmet you can hire them at the Mountain Shop in Natimuk.
Rocafella
10/02/2012
2:00:25 PM
I'd have to agree with ODH Chris...

At your current level, you are best to just climb (indoor/oudoor, bouldering/routes) as much as possible.. The danger you face is that muscles get stronger quicker than tendons do - if you go starting a campus regime, or fingerboards or using weight vests, you WILL, and I repeat WILL, hurt yourself.

If you want to get stronger, mix in a session of bouldering on some steep walls once a week for now, and then when thats easy you can re-evaluate...
Mike Bee
10/02/2012
2:06:56 PM
At your level, quite simply, climb a lot.
Climb a range of different stuff, in as many places as you can, as often as you can.
Steep jugs get your forearms stronger, but don't encourage precise footwork. Slabs rely entirely on using your feet well.

I'll throw it out there that perhaps buying a technique book might help to develop good habits. Check out The Self-Coached Climber if you're keen.
bones
10/02/2012
2:08:53 PM
Even though it feels like strength is causing you to struggle to on steeper climbs, it's probably actually lack of technique (not transferring enough weight to your feet and not climbing efficiently).
As others have said, more time on rock is the best thing for you. Evenings or daytrips to crappy crags near melbourne, or full weekends at Araps/Gramps if you can get there.

In the absence of real rock, I think Burnley or Lactic bouldering gyms would be good for you. There are always lots of people there willing to give technique advice, and bouldering can teach you about distibuting your weight correctly.
Otherwise just keep climbing at the regular gyms, but try to go with someone experienced who can give you technique tips.


hipdos
10/02/2012
2:10:29 PM
Well now you have answered the 20 questions I'd still say get in some finger strength and power training, especially if you aspire to mid-20 grades. If you can do an 18 on a vertical wall in the gym you are already going OK. Start with 15 minutes of bouldering at the end of your climbing gym sessions and go from there. In a few months look into some campusing, but do your research on injury prevention. I won't say any more than that or ODH will have another fit.

Sabu
10/02/2012
2:17:08 PM
Yea at this stage just climb everything you see.
This way you will build more technique which is far more important than strength in almost any situation. If you are climbing outdoors often you will learn the skills required to keep you alive (again, far more important than strength!). This will take longer if you are on trad. And as your technique and skills improve, your confidence will also increase (again more important than strength!).

The above should keep you busy for a while but once you stop improving via this method then you need to start thinking about more serious training regimes to build the strength required for busting into the higher grades (low-mid 20s and up).


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There are 53 messages in this topic.

 

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