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Chockstone Forum - General Discussion

General Climbing Discussion

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 37
Author
Goals for the spring climbing season
Mike Bee
14/09/2011
10:10:17 AM
I've got 4 more climbs at Araps that I'm *really* psyched on (Oceanoid, Scorpion, Eurydice, Tannin).
After that, I've got 1 at Moonarie that I'm *really really* psyched on (Downwind of Angles).

After that, I think I might actually be able to drive past Araps and get to the Gramps and climb there (I've climbed in the Gramps once, but I've had about 28 Araps trips total).
I'm really looking forwards to climbing at Mt Rosea, I hear great things.
I'm still trying to line up a victim/partner/belay bitch for an aid ascent of Passport to Insanity.
uwhp510
14/09/2011
10:13:17 AM
On 13/09/2011 a.brasington wrote:
>If any of the other Canberra areas are as nice as The Bellfry or Prism
>Rocks, then I think I am going to like climbing here a lot.

You're in luck. They're mostly better :) The belfry is good, particularly due to its summitishness, but you really want to check out Booroomba. Here's a list of good long stuff on the north buttress to get you started (I'm assuming you're looking for stuff around 17),

Equilibrium - 17 - 4 pitches - slab
Hermes (optional Thor finish) - 16(17) - 2 or 3 pitches - classy layback, strong line
Fearon - 16 - 3 pitches - airy bridging
Fiasco - 18 - 4? pitches - strong line up a crack
Outer limit - 18 - 6? pitches - steep slab
Closer in - 19 (well bolted - 3 pitches) (bail left before the headwall to dry route) - steep slab
Dry Route - 17 (chuckle) - start from the top of closer in - hilariously awesome... best 17 at Booroomba. You heard it here first.
citationx
14/09/2011
11:50:50 AM
On 14/09/2011 uwhp510 wrote:

>Equilibrium - 17 - 4 pitches - slab
>Outer limit - 18 - 6? pitches - steep slab
>Closer in - 19 (well bolted - 3 pitches) (bail left before the headwall
>to dry route) - steep slab

Are you trying to say that slabs harder than 17 are classified "steep"? What of a slab that is graded 23, 24, 25, 26 like those at buffalo? Are they like, overhanging slabs?

(I'd love to get my head back for leading Buffalo slabs this season - Not sure i'm going to get down there at all though).
pecheur
14/09/2011
12:08:06 PM
On 14/09/2011 davidn wrote:
>Steep is whatever makes you feel like you're going to fall off. Hard moves
>is whatever is hard for the person describing it.
>
>That is why these terms should not be used in guidebooks. Instead, use
>real description like 'near-vertical', 'overhanging by 5 degrees', 'crimping
>tiny crystals on big reachy balance moves'...

How are "big" and "reachy" any less subjective than "hard", I mean they may just be big and reachy for you but not some 2 m tall guy, or someone with a 2 m wingspan. Most of what you've written is still subjective, including "tiny" and "balance".

"Real" descriptions would list sizes, distances, as well as angles and IMO make guidebooks completely crap and boring.

Macciza
14/09/2011
12:34:47 PM
Re : I remembered correctly ...
I may have an old Thrutch witth some write up on that, I will have a look . . .
MM

Zarb
14/09/2011
12:39:25 PM
Shouldn't every grade be taken with a grain of salt anyway? Not just the description, but the numerical grade can be drastically harder for someone who can't reach as high as the original ascensionist.

nmonteith
14/09/2011
12:51:48 PM
Steep is anything more than vertical. Overhung is anything from about 91 degrees to 160 degrees. From then on it's a roof or ceiling. If it's just a few metres of steep then it's a bulge or rooflet.

IdratherbeclimbingM9
14/09/2011
1:08:40 PM
On 14/09/2011 Macciza wrote:
>Re : I remembered correctly ...
>I may have an old Thrutch witth some write up on that, I will have a look
>. . .
>MM

Thanks for that. I recall seeing an article long ago, but I doubt I have access to same anymore. Most of what I have read about the place is more specific about the caves there.
~> I need to visit appropriate info sites* to see what has been done there climbing-wise (not much, but I have heard of something being done), and hopefully put up something new that might interest others.
;-)

(* I looked at ACA and CragX but not surprisingly, they have nothing on the area).

Doug
14/09/2011
1:22:51 PM
Wow, great photos, especially the one of the longer stuff! Where is the Coolaman Cave Gorge and what sort of range are the routes?

I'm hoping that access to Mt Rosea will reopen before the end of October as there are a few things there that I'd like to have a go at before returning to Tassie ...
uwhp510
14/09/2011
1:36:26 PM
On 14/09/2011 citationx wrote:
>On 14/09/2011 uwhp510 wrote:
>
>>Equilibrium - 17 - 4 pitches - slab
>>Outer limit - 18 - 6? pitches - steep slab
>>Closer in - 19 (well bolted - 3 pitches) (bail left before the headwall
>>to dry route) - steep slab
>
>Are you trying to say that slabs harder than 17 are classified "steep"?
>What of a slab that is graded 23, 24, 25, 26 like those at buffalo? Are
>they like, overhanging slabs?

Ummm... No

This is so simple I can't believe I'm actually about to explain it.

The adjective "steep" obviously depends on the context in which its used (rock type, features etc). Its a relative term, not a "classification", which influences but doesn't on its own determine how hard a route is.

Outer Limit goes up a slab that is fairly high angled... or STEEP (for Booroomba anyway... <--- look, context), while Equilibrium goes up a different bit of rock which isn't as STEEP, and also incidentally has smaller, smoother holds. Outer Limit and Closer In are still definitely slabs, but relative to other slabs at Booroomba, they're quite STEEP. Nearby there is a grade 23 slab, which isn't as STEEP as Closer In, or Outer Limit.

Hopefully this post has helped you to understand the difference between the grade and the angle of a route.

You're welcome ;)
uwhp510
14/09/2011
1:38:33 PM
On 13/09/2011 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>>>the Cooleman Cave gorge!

Where is this gorge? Does it have any gradient?

IdratherbeclimbingM9
14/09/2011
1:38:52 PM
On 14/09/2011 Doug Bruce wrote:
>Wow, great photos, especially the one of the longer stuff! Where is the
>Cooleman Cave Gorge and what sort of range are the routes?
>

35 37' 25.98" S 148 41' 30.62" E

About 50 km (?) north of Adaminaby in NSW, and about half way between Yarrangobilly and Namadgi/Booroomba in a west-east direction, with an altitude of about 1200 m.
Access roads (tracks really), are seasonally closed till end of Sept. by NP&WS.

Routes? What routes?
~> They are yet to be done ;-)
Length of the longer cliffs would be max of about two ropelengths from vague* memory, but the topouts would be rounded grassy affairs.

(*I was last there in the early to mid 70's)

@ uwhp510
>Does it have any gradient?

For whitewater excitement?
No real gradient for that unless in extreme flood event. The photos show normal flow there, however below the gorge is a waterfall that would prove interesting...

rodw
14/09/2011
1:41:35 PM
From memory that limestone is pretty friable......also you should keep a very very low profile as I reckon NPWS would frown on any activity such as climbing there
uwhp510
14/09/2011
2:59:42 PM
Turns out its the main tributary of the Goodradigbee, so when that's up I'd expect this to be up too. And most of the river is about 15-25m/km. Access for a takeout is a b1tch though...

(Google earth is brilliant hey)

Macciza
14/09/2011
3:25:17 PM
On 14/09/2011 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:

>Thanks for that. I recall seeing an article long ago, . . .
>;-)
>

Thrutch No 71 June-July 1977 .
Greg Child at Wirindi on the front cover, Bob Ryan on DogFace on Editorial page.
And of course Mike Law styling on Weiding Wall on the back . . .

Article on Northern Snowy Mountains.
Areas aound Talbingo got developed when two Czechs Mylec & Nemec became friends in Talbingo in the early 70's. Dveloped several areas covering granitet, limestone and volcanics ( monolite)
Blue Water Holes Coolemon - great potential , quite close to Canberra via backtrails across Brindabella Range.
Five known routes, though old pitons were found on some first ascents??
Steep limestone, sustained routes; scenic nature should ensure future popularity . . .
Nearby Yarragobilly is also talked about favourably . . .

Hope that helps . . .

Cheers
MM

IdratherbeclimbingM9
14/09/2011
5:25:10 PM
On 14/09/2011 Macciza wrote:
>On 14/09/2011 IdratherbeclimbingM9 wrote:
>
>>Thanks for that. I recall seeing an article long ago, . . .
>>;-)
>>
>
>Thrutch No 71 June-July 1977 .
>Greg Child at Wirindi on the front cover, Bob Ryan on DogFace on Editorial
>page.
>And of course Mike Law styling on Weiding Wall on the back . . .
>
>Article on Northern Snowy Mountains.
>Areas aound Talbingo got developed when two Czechs Mylec & Nemec became
>friends in Talbingo in the early 70's. Dveloped several areas covering
>granitet, limestone and volcanics ( monolite)
>Blue Water Holes Coolemon - great potential , quite close to Canberra
>via backtrails across Brindabella Range.
>Five known routes, though old pitons were found on some first ascents??
>Steep limestone, sustained routes; scenic nature should ensure future
>popularity . . .
>Nearby Yarragobilly is also talked about favourably . . .
>
>Hope that helps . . .
>
>Cheers
>MM

Many thanks, as that info throws a bit of light on the subject.

Here is a link to Blue Water Holes thread (the same place).
~> It appears I am not the first to try and track down this info, and that MM started sleuthing the Argus/Thrutch connection back in 2008 too!

wallwombat
14/09/2011
9:31:16 PM
I'm hoping to get back to Nangar.

Pay back time!

 Page 2 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 37
There are 37 messages in this topic.

 

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