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Chockstone Forum - Gear Lust / Lost & Found

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Author
Chest Harness

BoulderBaby
26/04/2012
9:43:20 PM
So boulderbaby is looking to get back into route climbing!

Some of you may know that I have a spinal injury and am petrified to take falls in my harness, so I'm looking at using a chest harness to distribute the load.

However, I don't know what to look for in a chest harness, or how to use them.

I'm looking at getting the edelrid agent, http://www.edelrid.de/en/sports/products/harnesses/agent.html

Can anyone help?

Olivia

wallwombat
27/04/2012
1:28:54 AM
I would have thought that adding a chest harness to the scheme of things would put more impact on your spine than just using a sit harness, where your hips (center of gravity) take the impact.

That said, Climbing Anchors have a couple OK looking Black Diamond chest harnesses for less than $30 at the moment.

I can't imagine there is a huge difference between brands. They are a pretty simple piece of kit.
Richard Delaney
27/04/2012
6:45:03 AM
Hi Olivia,
Interesting situation. What part of you spine?
I know of one person who received a lumbar spine injury when he fell 6m before being arrested suddenly by his belayer - and he was effectively lying flat looking up at the sky at this point. The harness attachment point at his waist resulted in him being folded in half the wrong way.

The UIAA published a paper many (15?) years ago addressing this kind of situation and recommended that climbers wear full-body harnesses or sit/chest combinations - particularly if wearing backpacks ( think mountaineering and falling into a crevasse). I think they also found that this could, in some situations, increase the potential for neck/whiplash type injury as a high attachment point well away from the centre of gravity will tend to spin the body towards its neutral hanging position.

Some of the details here may be a bit fuzzy as it's been 15 years since I read this article - I tried a quick search but couldn't find it - I'm sure you will with a bit of persistence.

With regard to chest harnesses - every manufacturer has their own specific instructions and these often vary - particularly in respect to whether you're tying into the end of a rope or adding the harness to another situation. You may even find a light weight full-body harness serves you better.
Richard
widewetandslippery
27/04/2012
8:37:25 AM
With a user name boulderbaby don't you find bouldering harder on your spine than wearing a harness?

I through climbing and work have tinkered with a few full harness set ups and to get a set up that works for everything has never happened. It

I would suggest a sit harness with a very wide waist belt. Couple it with a chest harness for belaying, jugging etc. A chest harness works well in these situations but needs to be tight (ie. restrictive) which is why I dont like actually climbing one.

Again getting the right setup takes some mucking about. I would not recomend going out and buying what you suggested unless you are the million $ boulderbaby.

BoulderBaby
27/04/2012
9:34:16 AM

Cheers for the replies,

People have remarked to me before that 'bouldering is harder on your spine' but for me I don't feel it is that way. To me I don't feel like there is any force on my spine, and I am in control of my core whilst bouldering.

I have an injury called spondylolithisis of the L5/S1, which is essentially the vertebral body of my L5 has slipped forward, as it has bilateral fractures in the pars (Lamina/Spinous processes)
All harness sit in my lower back/small of my waist - and I am paranoid/petrified that when I take a fall/sit in the harness it's causing further damage to my back. - I do do a lot of core/stabilisation training as I had a fairly symptomatic episode and quite a lot of rehab to get to managable pain/pain free.
In my small attempts to lead/top rope again I have found there is too much pull/load through my lower back, and I'm finding the next day I'm in pain. Yes! I've even tried the 'don't sit on the rope' method,but lowering off is a killer.

I think I'm going to give a chest harness a go, or forever I will be a boulderer!

Can anyone show/link me how to use one?
pecheur
27/04/2012
9:37:13 AM
On 27/04/2012 BoulderBaby wrote:
>
>>I think I'm going to give a chest harness a go, or forever I will be a
>boulderer!
>
>Can anyone show/link me how to use one?
>
Surely a fate worse than death, someone save this poor soul! ;)

Maybe we could use that in an ad: "Please donate to my rack or I'll have to be a boulderer!"
widewetandslippery
27/04/2012
9:47:08 AM
On 27/04/2012 BoulderBaby wrote:
>
>Cheers for the replies,
>
>People have remarked to me before that 'bouldering is harder on your spine'
>but for me I don't feel it is that way. To me I don't feel like there is
>any force on my spine, and I am in control of my core whilst bouldering.
>
>I have an injury called spondylolithisis of the L5/S1, which is essentially
>the vertebral body of my L5 has slipped forward, as it has bilateral fractures
>in the pars (Lamina/Spinous processes)
>All harness sit in my lower back/small of my waist - and I am paranoid/petrified
>that when I take a fall/sit in the harness it's causing further damage
>to my back. - I do do a lot of core/stabilisation training as I had a fairly
>symptomatic episode and quite a lot of rehab to get to managable pain/pain
>free.
>In my small attempts to lead/top rope again I have found there is too
>much pull/load through my lower back, and I'm finding the next day I'm
>in pain. Yes! I've even tried the 'don't sit on the rope' method,but lowering
>off is a killer.
>
>I think I'm going to give a chest harness a go, or forever I will be a
>boulderer!
>
>Can anyone show/link me how to use one?
>

I have a bad lower back and as said previously a harness that will effectively spread load will restrict movement.If you are going to try get a sling and use it as a chest harness with your regular sit harness and have a muck about. There are many variations of attachment. You can tie in just at the waist, maybe just waist tie in and run rope through the chest, tie in high. Muck around and then at least if you by a full body harness you'll know what you are looking for.

BoulderBaby
27/04/2012
10:17:37 AM
On 27/04/2012 pecheur wrote:
>On 27/04/2012 BoulderBaby wrote:
>>
>>>I think I'm going to give a chest harness a go, or forever I will
>be a
>>boulderer!

>>
>>Can anyone show/link me how to use one?
>>
>Surely a fate worse than death, someone save this poor soul! ;)
>
>Maybe we could use that in an ad: "Please donate to my rack or I'll have
>to be a boulderer!"


Nothing wrong with being a boulderer.

davidn
27/04/2012
10:18:13 AM
What's so bad about always being a boulderer?

I also was confused by WWS' comment, but I suspect with all his other injuries he's either fallen on his back a lot or has a bad back from time spent hanging and bolting. That'll teach him to discover bits of Nowra.

White Trash
27/04/2012
4:09:56 PM
>Nothing wrong with being a boulderer.
unless you like wearing a harness while doing it?

>What's so bad about always being a boulderer?
looking silly wearing a harness while doing it?

what have you discovered lately davidn?

i agree with wetandslip, try out some knotted tape variations to check where how you need the support before commit to buying something fancy.


Climbau
28/04/2012
8:53:51 AM
BB - have you thought about a "bumstrap" set up. A wide sling(think 50mm minimum, the wider the better) correctly tensioned under the butt. That way some pressure will be released from the waist and moved to the butt effectively putting the spine into compression. Chest harnesses are great for raising the centre of gravity and releasing pressure from the waist, but put a knot/carabiner at face level in a fall-arrest situation. Chest harness may be the solution but consider whether you will knock your teeth from your face in a fall in the experimental phase instead if in a reallife situation.
Also, there are some theatrical solutions that may be worth considering.
PM me for details if you like.

There are 11 messages in this topic.

 

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