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Chockstone Forum - Accidents & Injuries

Report Accidents and Injuries

Author
Emergency Number - 112

BadBrad of the Isles
23/11/2007
10:35:41 AM
I completed a first aid course through work this week and was astounded how many people didn't know the correct emergency numbers and more particularly the emergency number to call from a cell phone.

I'm unsure whether this is indicative of the climbing population or not but for what its worth the number to dial from a cell phone for emergencies in Australia is 112. On most phones it will override kepyad lockouts and doesn't matter whether you have credit.

Cheers, Brad.

tnd
23/11/2007
11:08:53 AM
You can also call 000 from a cell phone if it is working and has coverage. 112 is designed to override credit issues and will transmit via any network that has coverage, not just your own. I think it is international e.g. you could call 112 on a cell in the US instead of 911.

AlanD
23/11/2007
6:16:22 PM
Slightly more to it than that from my understanding. The 000 number goes through to any available operator, so if you have an accident in Melbourne, you might be speaking to an operator in say Perth. With the 112 number, the call will be patched through the closest emergency number call centre, as a result the people have some local knowledge of the area.
kieranl
23/11/2007
7:01:12 PM
Sorry, but I've never heard of 112 but I do know about 000. Perhaps you could explain how the two systems work rather than confusing us with broad statements.
In my experience 000 works. Please tell me how 112 is different/better.

skink
23/11/2007
7:20:44 PM
Jeez people, in this day and age why speculate on something so simple to confirm - just Google (PS Brad you're wrong - primary emergency number is 000, secondary is 112 - read below - you should check your facts before sounding off on important issues, and maybe ask for a refund from the first aid course people):

From http://internet.aca.gov.au/WEB/STANDARD/1001/pc=PC_100575 - i.e. the government - the people who provide the service (they'd know, ya think):

What are Australia's Emergency Call Services numbers?
Triple Zero (000) is Australia's primary Emergency Call Service number and should be used to access emergency assistance from all telephones (landline, mobile phones and payphones) in the first instance. Information about calling Triple Zero (000) from a voice over internet protocol service is available.
112 is the GSM standard Emergency Call Service number for use with GSM mobile phones, and offers special access features (see below). 112 can also be dialled from other mobile phones, but will only offer the same features that dialling Triple Zero (000) provides.
106 is the text-based Emergency Call Service for people who are deaf or have a hearing or speech impairment. This service operates using a TTY (teletypewriter) and does not accept voice calls or SMS messages.
Both 112 and 106 are secondary emergency call services numbers because they are for use only in relation to particular technologies.

So 000 is the number to remember...

glad I got that off my chest...

BigMike
23/11/2007
7:23:52 PM
what happens when you dial 911?


skink
23/11/2007
7:27:07 PM
jeez, BigMike, are you as lazy as the rest, or just trolling - from the above website:

"911 is used by emergency services in the United States of America and cannot be used to call the Emergency Call Service in Australia."
kieranl
23/11/2007
7:48:55 PM
Thanks andesite for clearing that up. It would be really nice if people actually did some research before starting potentially confusing posts such as this.
Some people have asked me why the Arapiles Rescue Group does not give a number for climbers to ring. Disregarding the legal stuff, if you actually need us then you are in a situation where you need a coordinated emergency response. We don't want to get to an incident and find that we need paramedics and they haven't been called.

Sabu
24/11/2007
12:05:09 AM
My understanding is that the Rescue group is contacted via 000 right?

GravityHound
24/11/2007
6:32:57 AM
On 24/11/2007 Sabu wrote:
>My understanding is that the Rescue group is contacted via 000 right?

And my understanding is because we live in Australia, we call 000 from a mobile phone, not a cell phone. Sorry, but I just hate how we seem to take on Americanisms so easily :)

anthonyk
24/11/2007
10:24:29 AM
000 should bypass the keylock on phones as well. 000 is the australian number, 112 is an international standard and will work here and likely work overseas, so its good to know if you're going to be o/s with a mobile phone somewhere.

Rupert
25/11/2007
7:40:55 PM
Most mobile phones don't even need a SIM card in them to work with 000 either.

BadBrad of the Isles
26/11/2007
3:43:49 PM
Andesite you obviously have a bee in your bonnet this, it's good to see someone so passionate about personal safety and emergency response.

For the record this is not the first time that 112 has been indicated to me as the number to call from a cellphone. So perhaps i better get my money back from the training provider and the ambos and the firies... you'd think they'd know ;-)

Cheers, Brad.
BA
26/11/2007
4:51:41 PM
On 26/11/2007 BadBrad of the Isles wrote:

>For the record this is not the first time that 112 has been indicated
>to me as the number to call from a cellphone.

See post above: "And my understanding is because we live in Australia, we call 000 from a mobile phone, not a cell phone. Sorry, but I just hate how we seem to take on Americanisms so easily :)"


PS Can you do multiple quotes in a post?
Wollemi
26/11/2007
7:15:48 PM
Americanisms? When last in NZ I saw bill-board advertisements for cell-phones, was asked for my cell number and was told if I had a cell all would be sweet while alone out on a ski tour. Not once did I see nor hear the term 'mobile'.

GravityHound
26/11/2007
8:44:04 PM
OK, then New Zealandisms as well.....

There are 16 messages in this topic.

 

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