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Chockstone Forum - Crag & Route Beta

Crag & Route Beta

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 25
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Author
Classic problems at Font
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
10:01:47 AM
So, after a couple of months in the Dolomites (June and July), we're off to Font for 3 weeks in August. Having never bouldered in the great outdoors before, I figured this would be a good place to start.

So, for all of you boulderers out there what are the classic problems at Font that shouldn't be missed. Any style of problem is fine. I have no idea what grades I'd boulder there, but I think it's pretty safe to assume it would be at the lower end of the scale.
cheers

nmonteith
11/05/2011
10:13:18 AM
Font is the sort of place where half the fun is just running around and trying whatever looks good. Forget grades, names and beta. Just climb for the pure fun of it! I never felt the need to look at a guidebook. It's an awesome place...
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
10:18:54 AM
Thanks Neil,
Whether we needed a guidebook or not was going to be my next question. So, any suggestions on general areas? Or just head to the main ones and go for it?
cheers

nmonteith
11/05/2011
10:26:40 AM
I'd suggest getting some sort of map showing the locations of the areas at the very least. We spent most of our time guidebookless at Bas Cuvier which was fantastic - but we didn't have much success locating other better areas by just stumbling around in the bush!
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
10:31:52 AM
Right, next question. Is it worth getting a mat? I think we can hire them for about 20 euro's a week where we're staying.

nmonteith
11/05/2011
10:38:50 AM
On 11/05/2011 Cam McKenzie wrote:
>Right, next question. Is it worth getting a mat? I think we can hire them
>for about 20 euro's a week where we're staying.

You don't 'need' a mat. Most the locals weren't using one when we were there. We just used our sleeping mats and some cushions Lee stole from the deck chair of the caravan park we were staying at. The landings are usually flat with either a layer of leaves or sand. Most of the locals just seemed to carry around a square of carpet to keep their shoes clean. However - after breaking my ankle bouldering a few years back I can see that a mat could be a good idea....
Duncan
11/05/2011
10:39:34 AM
I wasn't a huge fan of Bas Cuvier - too many hard men. Trois Pignons was my pick. There's plenty of stuff in the area, with Le Cul de Chien just nearby. I would definitely recommend a pad, but at least a bit of carpet for cleaning your shoes is necessary.
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
10:44:32 AM
Thanks lads,
20 euros a week is a small investment for non broken ankles.
cheers
J.C.
11/05/2011
10:56:32 AM
Bas Cuvier was fun, lots of hard stuff but plenty of awesome easy climbing too, blue circuit kept me entertained for a while. id take a mat, especially at your age mate

Eduardo Slabofvic
11/05/2011
11:27:15 AM
Get yourself a small mat to wipe your feet on to get the sand off them, get some poff and pick a colour (rough grade) and head off on the circuits. The really hard stuff tends not to be marked, but there was a great blue circuit out the back of Bas Cuvier which had jumps, down climbs and other cool stuff as well as the problems themselves. A map of the forest is all you really need by way of guide.

I saw one guy who had his little mat (about the size of half a carpet square) tethered to his waist by a longish cord, so he could pull it up after him when he'd done the problem so as to not have to keep running back around for it

nmonteith
11/05/2011
11:45:07 AM
On 11/05/2011 Eduardo Slabofvic. wrote:
>I saw one guy who had his little mat (about the size of half a carpet
>square) tethered to his waist by a longish cord, so he could pull it up
>after him when he'd done the problem so as to not have to keep running
>back around for it

Classic French solution to a problem! That's why I love French cars.
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
12:41:02 PM
On 11/05/2011 J.C. wrote:
>especially at your age mate

Wow, I feel like I'm being stalked!

Do the laws of physics not apply to those under 30?

rodw
11/05/2011
12:53:41 PM
No brain = no pain maybe?
dalai
11/05/2011
12:59:04 PM
On 11/05/2011 Cam McKenzie wrote:
>Whether we needed a guidebook or not was going to be my next question.
>So, any suggestions on general areas? Or just head to the main ones and
>go for it?

Guidebook is not neccessary, there is so much quality you can just have a go at lines that take your fancy. Though knowing the grade does help save you time not throwing yourself at problems that are too hard. Problems can be very deceptive and look much easier than they are. Also some can be conditions dependant for friction so can be much harder when warm.

If going guideless, some research as to what grade range the circuits are at the areas you plan on visiting. Then by knowing the colour for the problem (many are marked) you at least have a rough idea of the difficulty. Circuits are also a fun way of spending some time in the forest!

You don't need a mat - I just bought a door mat from the local shops to use as a base and was fine for most problems as much is sand or dirt at the bottom. For rough landings I'd recommend a mat but there are enough problems at Font to move onto something else anyway. But if given the option (and a cheap one at that) I'd use a mat.
maxdacat
11/05/2011
2:16:43 PM
I thought Elephant was a really good are, esp Le Toit du Loup (6b). It's a bit taller than some areas so you would definitely want a mat.

Rocher Sabots is another great place with some memorable 7a's, Graviton, Jet Set and L'Oblique.

Both are a little bit less crowded than Bas Cuvier.

Lots of people will probably tell you it's "impossible" to climb in Font in summer but i'm sure you can find something if you pick your time and area. This is a really good guide:

http://www.stonecountry.co.uk/stonecountry.html

but not sure if you can get it either here in Oz or over there (unless going via London). The local guide of choice i think is the Godoffe one (but i could be wrong).
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
2:36:36 PM
On 11/05/2011 maxdacat wrote:
>Lots of people will probably tell you it's "impossible" to climb in Font
>in summer but i'm sure you can find something if you pick your time and
>area. This is a really good guide:

Thanks, I'm hoping to use the lack of friction as an excuse for my failures. At least it won't be busy.
Wendy
11/05/2011
2:56:06 PM
i've only ever been there in summer. it rained on me at least one day both times. I'm not sure that northern france really gets that hot.

I wandered into the tourism office to get a forest map and the woman there promptly circled the main bouldering areas for me. I probably still have it somewhere, plus a guidebook, if you make it up here before you go. The guide really only got used to get us there, then we just followed the colours - pick a colour or 2 of the right grade range and follow them around at random.

My favourite spots were the cul de chien and l'elefant. sandy landings are great! I also spent a bit of time at rocher canon and st germain - because you can walk to them from bois le roi station. Canon is the more extensive of the two. Didn't bother going to bas cuvier because it's been super popular for years, being next to the old campsite, and thus apparently well polished. It's also well endowed with slabs and we all know how much i love slabs.
Cam McKenzie
11/05/2011
3:08:30 PM
Thanks Wendy,
And cheers for the offer of the guide. I'm sure someone from the Melbourne crew will be down your way prior to our departure, so I might get someone to pop in and grab it off you and grizz if that's cool.

What were the crowds like in summer?

We will have just come from a few weeks climbing on the Marmolada, so I'll either be a slab master, or dead!

nmonteith
11/05/2011
3:22:25 PM
I didn't find Bas Cuvier polished at all. Certainly not compared to some of the French limestone!

Paulie
11/05/2011
7:23:58 PM
the world's first 6a (Marie et la rose?) is way over-rated imo

 Page 1 of 2. Messages 1 to 20 | 21 to 25
There are 25 messages in this topic.

 

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